Invited Congress Speakers

KEYNOTE ADDRESSES


Janel G. Gauthier

Janel G. Gauthier, IAAP Presidential Address

Focus of Lecture: The development of ethics in psychology and its implications for addressing the global and local ethical issues facing psychologists

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Abstract: Psychological ethics has come a long way since the publication of the very first code of ethics for psychologists by the American Psychological Association in 1953. The purpose of this address is to reflect on the development of ethics documents in psychology and consider the relevance and meaning of the Universal Declaration of Ethical Principles for Psychologists in addressing the global and local ethical challenges facing psychologists in today’s world. In the opening, following a few definitions to guide our journey, I provide an overview of the development of ethics documents in psychology and show how politics, economics, social needs, and a myriad of other factors influence the creation of ethics documents and the thinking about what is virtuous, what is ethical, and even what is considered to be the rights of being human. Then follows a very brief presentation of the Universal Declaration of Ethical Principles for Psychologists in which I highlight the main contributions of the document to the present day moral discourse. Next, I call on psychology to play a more active role in the promotion of ethical principles based on shared human values across cultures, and the development of effective approaches to bring more people worldwide to do the right thing for the right reason and develop resilience against moral disengagement. Hopes for a better world for all require both a better psychological understanding of human nature and a renewed emphasis on the promotion of respect for persons and peoples as a foundation for peace and harmony.

Bio: Dr. Janel Gauthier is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Laval University, Canada. He also is President of the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP) and a past-president of the Canadian Psychological Association. He was the Chair of the Ad Hoc Joint Committee that developed the Universal Declaration of Ethical Principles for Psychologists (2008) under the auspices of the International Union of Psychological Science and the International Association of Applied Psychology. His contributions to international psychological ethics have been recognized through a number of national and international awards. He has authored/co-authored articles and book chapters on both ethics and human rights.

Affiliation: IAAP President 2014-2018
CPA President 1996-1997, 1997-1998
School of Psychology, Laval University, Québec, Canada


Sverre L. Nielsen

Sverre L. Nielsen, IAAP Award Winner

Focus of Lecture: Competence. The Master Key.

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Abstract: Competence as a Common Language for Professional Identity and International Recognition was the mantra of the process that lead to the endorsement of the International Declaration on Core Competences in Professional Psychology (2016). Is it possible to use the Declaration as a step stone for developing a competence standard? How do we overcome, or combine, the diversity within psychologist’s practice all over the world, within various fields of psychology, gaining uniformity without losing cultural distinctiveness? Is it wanted, needed, or just an impossible idea? With the great number of models for educating and training psychologists that exist, there is more than enough challenges to bite into. How far can we get in search for the common denominator?

Bio:
- Authorized psychologist, University of Bergen, 1973.
- Practice in clin. psych.within the field of addiction.
- Manager of the first Norwegian Government campaign against drugs.
- 1983 – 2009 full time, 2009 - present, part time employed in the Norwegian Psych. Ass. (NPA) as president (8 years), secretary general (10 years) and senior adviser.
- A number of positions in national and international associations.
- Co-chair of the 2nd (ASPPB) International Congress on Regulations.
- Fellow of ASPPB and IAAP.
- Manager of the European Congress of Psychology (ECP), Oslo 2009.
- Co-Chair of the 5th (ASPPB) International Congress on Regulations, Stockholm, July 2013, participation by invitation only, (which was the start of the “International Project on Competence in Psychology – IPCP”.
- Chair of the IPCP Work Group.

Affiliation: Norwegian Psychological Association


Maria Regina Maluf

Maria Regina Maluf, 2018 IAAP Distinguished Professional Contributions Award

Focus of Lecture: Internationalization and Training of Psychologists: A Global Perspective

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Abstract: Internationalization is a word to which different meanings can be attributed. The same can be said about internationalization of psychology as well as about the education and training of psychologists. As we all know, psychological science developed mainly in the western developed countries. Nevertheless, nowadays it is growing very fast in many other societies. This generates a lot of consequences not always recognized by “normal” science. The purpose of this presentation is to address some of the challenges we face today, such as: in what sense can it be said that the psychology that emerged in the more developed Western countries is the same that is emerging in developing countries? What does the real world and the socio-cultural and economic context pose as a challenge to the training of young psychologists? In what sense can research training be fully integrated into the training of psychologists in developing countries?

Bio: Dr Maria Regina Maluf is a Professor of Psychology at the Catholic University of São Paulo, Brazil. She is also a retired associate professor at the University of São Paulo. She is an elected member of the Academy of Psychology of the State of São Paulo (since 2006; Chair n. 28) and her current Vice President. Maria Regina has served IAAP actively since 2002. She is former president of the Inter-American Psychological Society, SIP (2011-2012). She received her PhD from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium, where his doctoral thesis on Motivation and Time Perspective was directed by Prof. Joseph Nuttin; after that she stayed as Visiting Research Scholar at the U.C.L.A (USA) and at the I.N.R.P., Paris, France. Since the beginning of her career she has been working as a professor, researcher and professional in the field of Developmental and Educational Psychology, in Brazil. She has strong interest and commitment to the internationalization of knowledge in Psychology which led her to participate actively in international symposia and seminars on the internationalization of psychology and on the psychology education and training of the psychologist. Some of her research projects has been developed in collaboration with colleagues from universities in France, Belgium and the United States. The international impact of her work took place mainly in Latin American countries (Peru, Colombia, Bolivia, Paraguay, Chile, Equator, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Cuba, Mexico, Argentina among others) through lectures, courses, invited colloquia, workshops, as well as through publications in Spanish and English besides Portuguese. She serves as a reviewer for peer-reviewed journals in Portuguese, English, Spanish, French; she also acts as an evaluator of research projects of various funding agencies in Brazil and in some other countries. She has been awarded research funding from the main Brazilian research agencies, such as CNPq, FAPESP, and CAPES. Presently she acts as coordinator and leader of the Research Group "Initial Schooling and Psychological Development", which develops activities and applied research on literacy, metalanguage and social cognition, with children in the first years of life, mainly from families in situations of social risk. She has over 70 published articles; 40 book chapters/edited books; she supervised 45 PhD theses.
https://wwws.cnpq.br/cvlattesweb/PKG_MENU.menu?f_cod=BDF0D4FFADE5AEBC33C6375222641BC1

http://www.mrmaluf.com.br/
http://appsico.org.br/

Affiliation: Catholic University of São Paulo (PUC/SP), Brazil.


Alfred Allen

Alfred Allen, Jean Pettifor Distinguished Lecture in Ethics

Focus of Lecture: The professions’ response to the changing expectations of a society fearful of the risk of violent harm

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Abstract: Similar to the Universal Declaration of Ethical Principles for Psychologists and the ethics codes of several other countries, Principle IV of the Canadian Code of Ethics for Psychologists states that psychologists have an ethical responsibility to abide by society’s prevailing mores and laws as part of their responsibility to society. In fulfilling their contract with society, however, psychologists must do this whilst upholding the other ethical principles of the Code as well. Psychologists have traditionally found it difficult to balance these sometimes conflicting responsibilities, especially in respect of the disclosure of clients’ confidential information. There was a shared professional understanding of what the threshold was for disclosing private information by the end of the 20th century. The question now is whether the profession might need to revise this understanding because events in the 21st century have increased society’s fear of violence and, therefore, beliefs about the place of privacy in society and expectations of psychologists and other professionals regarding protecting privacy. The profession should consider if psychologists can meet these expectations with maximum accommodation of all the ethical principles; and if so, how they can go about it as ethical psychologists. I will analyse the situation and suggest steps the profession could consider taking both to maintain the highest ethical standards and to retain society’s (e.g., governments’ and individuals’) respect for and trust in psychologists.

Bio:

Affiliation: Professor, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Australia
Chair, IAAP Ethics Committee


Dolores Albarracin

Dolores Albarracin

Focus of Lecture: Designing Actionable Interventions to Change Behavior

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Division 8: Health Psychology

Abstract: In my own work, I have asked a number of questions that I believe are central to our understanding of behavior, attitudes, intentions and goals as a function of personal and situational factors. A question addressed in my research is how much behaviors change and how they change. Specifically, I will discuss how asking new questions in subtle ways shapes our behavior. I will then describe how, ironically, behavior change can depend on people feeling strong enough to seek information that counters prior practices, how external information produces more behavior change when it is actionable, and how changes in behavior align with persuasive communications presented online and in real life.

Bio: Dolores Albarracin is a Professor of Psychology, Business, and Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She was previously a professor at the University of Florida and at the University of Pennsylvania. She is a leader in the fields of communication and persuasion as well as behavior change. She is the lead editor of the Handbook of Attitudes, which has become a source of reference with national and international reach. She has published over 130 journal articles and book chapters in the premier outlets of the fields of psychology and allied sciences. She is a fellow of the Society for Experimental Social Psychology, the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, the American Psychological Association, and the Association for Psychological Science. She is currently chief editor of Psychological Bulletin. Her research addresses the following questions:
1. How can we persuade others to engage in socially beneficial behaviors? Under what conditions do changes in attitudes predict behavior? How do attitudes change over time, and what role does memory play (e.g. sleeper effects)? When do we seek out information that is likely to confirm vs. challenge prior attitudes? What is the durability of misinformation, and how can we counter misconceptions, “fake news”, and conspiracy theories?
2. How is action structured and socially conditioned? Do action goals promote changes in attitudes and behavioral routines? Do people engage in behavior for the sake of being active, and what are the potential self-regulatory consequences of this tendency? Do these tendencies vary across cultures? How can this theorizing be used to change multiple risky behaviors?
3. How can we use the psychology of social cognition, attitudes, and motivation for health promotion? What types of campaigns and interventions work for different groups? How can we use social media to mobilize communities to shape their environments and promote health?

Affiliation: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Alfred Allan

Alfred Allan

Focus of Lecture: The ethical responsibilities of researchers, reviewers and editors working in the psychology and law field

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Division 10: Psychology and Law

Abstract: Psychologists’ role in the psychology and law (psycholegal) field is well-established and authors have explored the ethical obligations of those working as practitioners in this field. Practitioners, however, use knowledge, methods and instruments produced by researchers and the practical effectiveness and ethical integrity of what they do therefore hinges on the ethical integrity of the researchers and their research processes, including the publication of their findings. Society have until now mostly trusted researchers to monitor themselves leaving the regulation of the research process to the disciplines and professions, who in turn leave the external scrutiny of researchers’ work to, mostly, peers who serve as members of institutional ethics committees, editors and reviewers. Courts’ criticism of products of psycholegal research is a warning to the field that it might lose the privilege of self-regulating its research if it does not critically examine its ethical obligations and consider how it can aspire to effectively meet them. I will therefore in this paper undertake a high level analysis of the ethical obligations that govern the activities of psychologists involved in the research process in the psycholegal field and consider methods the field could implement to assist in achieving these aspirations.

Bio: Alfred Allan qualified in law and psychology and is a registered psychologist with clinical and forensic endorsements in Australia and was formerly registered as a clinical psychologist in South Africa. He has taught law, psychology and professional ethics in Law, Medical and Psychology Schools in South Africa and Australia. He is currently professor at Edith Cowan University in Perth, Australia. He is a director and the chair of the Standing Committee on Ethics of the International Association for Applied Psychology (IAAP), a Fellow of the Australian Psychological Society (APS) and a foundation member of the Psychology Board of Australia. He is a past president of the Psychology and Law Division of the IAAP, Australian and New Zealand Association for Psychiatry, Psychology and Law and a past chair of the APS College of Forensic Psychologists, the Ethics Committee of the APS, and of the Working Group that reviewed the APS's Code of Ethics in 2007. He is a member of the working group that is currently reviewing the APS's Code of Ethics and has published widely in ethics, law, psychology and psychiatry journals and serves on the editorial boards of several journals. He is also the author of several chapters in books and books, primarily on professional law and ethics and has presented workshops and seminars on this topic in several countries.

Affiliation: Edith Cowan University, Australia


Telmo Mourinho Baptista

Telmo Mourinho Baptista

Focus of Lecture: Solving the world’s problems with the help of Psychology

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract: The world faces many problems for which the contribution of psychology is of vital importance. Our science and practice can contribute to eliminate or improve many of the difficulties that we are dealing. The agenda to solve these problems was set by the United Nations when in September 2015 they approved the Sustainable Development Goals.
In this keynote, I present some of the leading contributions of psychology to the SDG’s but also reflect in some on the coming trends for the 21st century, such as the new power models, the change of the way work will be done and the importance of going further with community and prevention interventions.
I will also reflect on the challenge that this represents to psychology and the role of the psychology organisations in shaping the future and helping the citizens to benefit from our knowledge.

Bio: Telmo Mourinho Baptista, PhD is currently the president of the European Federation of Psychologists’ Association EFPA(representing 37 European countries).
Professor of Psychotherapy at the University of Lisbon, Portugal, Department of Psychotherapy.
Psychotherapist and Health Psychologist.
Currently serves as the President of the Portuguese Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies.
Founder of the Ordem dos Psicólogos Portugueses (Order of Portuguese Psychologists) of which he became the first president (2009-2016), the national organisation of the Portuguese Psychologists.
President of the Ibero-American Federation of Psychologists Association (FIAP) from 2012-2014, and founder and president of the Portuguese Speaking Countries Federation of Psychology Association (PSIPLP).
Telmo Mourinho Baptista has been a representative of psychological organisations at several governmental and NGO levels.

Affiliation: President, European Federation of Psychologists Association (EFPA)


Jocelyn J. Bélanger

Jocelyn J. Bélanger

Focus of Lecture: The Psychology of Self-Sacrifice

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Extremism & Terrorism; Sport & Exercise

Abstract: We are all preoccupied by the coming of death, the moment when the matter that constitutes our bodies stops functioning. Suicide bombers unsettle this firmly established belief by trampling on the fundamental notion of self-preservation. But how do they willingly walk into the jaws of death? In this talk, I will review recent progress related to the psychology of self-sacrifice. I begin by defining what self-sacrifice is as an object of study and how it is conceptualized and measured as an individual difference. The notion of self-sacrifice will then be situated among other related constructs to emphasize its unique contribution to psychological science. Once its nomological network has been delimited, I discuss several motivational components relevant to self-sacrifice using the 3N model of radicalization (Kruglanski et al., 2014b; Webber & Kruglanski, 2016) which postulates that extremism happens as a result of three elements coming together: individuals’ Needs, Network, and Narrative. Lastly, I discuss how the power of the 3Ns can also be harnessed for peace building and conciliation.

Bio: Jocelyn J. Bélanger is a professor of psychology at New York University Abu Dhabi. He earned his master's degree and doctorate in Social Psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. His research focuses on human judgment, belief formation, and the psychology of terrorism. This interdisciplinary topic has led him to collaborate on several international large-scale projects with the National Consortium for Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START), examining the motivational underpinnings of radicalization and deradicalization among terrorists located in the Middle-East and South-East Asia. In March 2015, he was appointed by the City of Montreal to establish the first deradicalization center in North America to tackle homegrown terrorism (CPRLV). Dr Bélanger is the recipient of several awards such as the APA Dissertation Research Award and the Guy Bégin Award for the Best Research Paper in Social Psychology. He is also the author of numerous scientific articles published in top-tier journals of his discipline including American Psychologist, Psychological Review, and the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. His research is funded by the Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada as well as the US Department of Homeland Security.

Affiliation: New York University, Abu Dhabi


Guillermo Bernal

Guillermo Bernal

Focus of Lecture: Toward a Science for Cultural Adaptation of Psychotherapy

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract: Major developments have been achieved in the study cultural adaptations of psychotherapy and evidence based interventions (EBIs) with diverse ethnocultural groups and Majority-World populations. The presentation addresses conceptual, ethical, contextual, and methodological issues related to cultural adaptations. First definitions of adaptations are reviewed and the process of cultural adaptation is defined. A conceptual approach is proposed that views psychotherapies and EBIs as consisting of a propositional model, a procedural model, and the philosophical assumptions that undergirding these models. Imposing models based on assumptions foreign to Majority-World populations. As the validity of universality in behavioral science is in question and as Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT) seldom examine the ecological validity of evidence-based interventions and treatments (EBI/T), transferring such interventions to ethnocultural groups assuming universality is mistaken since interventions are embedded with values, norms, beliefs, and world-views that may be contrary to the world-views of ethnocultural groups. Finally, we present evidence from meta-analyses on the benefits of cultural adaptations of psychotherapies and discuss the movement toward a science of cultural adaptation of EBIs particularly with ethnocultural groups and Majority-World populations. Learning outcomes include: 1) conceptual, ethical, contextual, and methodological resources on conducting cultural adaptations; 2) definitions and types of cultural adaptations; 2) debate on a science of adaptations.

Bio: Guillermo Bernal is Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs and Professor at the Carlos Albizu University. In January of 2017 he retired from the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, where he was Professor of Psychology and founding Director of the Institute for Psychological Research. His work has focused on research, training, and the development of mental health services responsive to ethno-cultural groups. A primary area of work is in conducting randomized clinical trials on culturally adapted treatments for depression in youth. Since 1992, his team has generated evidence on the efficacy of culturally adapted CBT and IPT, carried out translations and development of instruments, and published on factors associated to vulnerability of depression. He has published over 200 articles in peer reviewed journals, chapters, reports, and nine books. He is the recipient of numerous awards from the professional associations. His recent books are: titled Culturally Adaptations: Tools for evidence based practice with diverse populations (with Domenech Rodríguez) and Evidence-Based psychological practice with ethnic minorities: Culturally informed research and clinical strategies (with Zane & Leong) both published by APA books.

Affiliation: Albizu University – San Juan & Miami Campus


James Bray

James Bray

Focus of Lecture: International Perspectives on Integrated Health Care

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Professional Psychology

Abstract:

Bio: James H. Bray, PhD is Professor and Chair of Psychology at the University of Texas San Antonio. He was previously an Associate Professor of Family and Community Medicine and Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. He was the 2009 President of the American Psychological Association. His presidential themes were the Future of Psychology Practice and Science and Psychology’s Contribution to Ending Homelessness. He is also president of the Division of Professional Practice of the International Association of Applied Psychology. Dr. Bray’s NIH funded research focuses on adolescent substance use, divorce, remarriage and stepfamilies. He has published over 200 articles in major journal and books. He was the director of a federal HRSA faculty development program for physicians and was the director of the SAMSHA funded project on screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) project. He is a pioneer in collaborative healthcare and primary care psychology. He has presented his work in 20 countries.

Affiliation: Professor and Chair of Psychology at the University of Texas San Antonio.


Charles P. Chen

Charles P. Chen

Focus of Lecture: Enriching Career Psychology with Positive Compromise

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Counselling

Abstract: Vocational wellness comprises an integral and critical part of the total wellbeing and mental health of human beings, given the fact that issues of worklife and other aspects of personal and social life experiences are intertwined. With a central focus on enhancing individuals’ vocational wellbeing, the essential role and function of career psychology aim to help people generate insights and find more effective ways to take control of their career destination, managing and improving their quality of life in a highly competitive and uncertain world of work. To this end, this keynote address introduces the emerging model of Positive Compromise (PC) in career psychology. The PC model provides both a theoretical framework and a practical guide for scholars, researchers, and practitioners in the realm of vocational and career psychology broadly defined, helping people to be creative and proactive in career management. The central premise is that in light of uncertainty a person often has to give up something less feasible and achievable in order to accomplish career goals and projects that are more practical and obtainable. As a result, compromise becomes an inevitable vital construct in achieving a healthier and more constructive state of vocational being. To expand on the theoretical notion of compromise in the career literature, this address elaborates on the rationale and key tenets of the positive compromise framework, leading to reconceptualizing the meaning of compromise in vocational and career psychology. Alongside evidence from empirical research, the positive compromise framework provides an optimal alternative for career management and construction. Implications for career counselling interventions are illustrated.

In doing so, this address attempts to achieve three learning objectives. First, understand the value of existing theories. Second, see the great potential and meaningfulness of theoretical development in the field. Third, build a pivotal link between theory, research, and practice.

Bio: Charles P. Chen, PhD, is Professor of Counselling Psychology and a Canada Research Chair at the University of Toronto (UofT). He is a Distinguished Honorary Professor and Guest Chair Professor at more than 10 major universities around the world. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Psychological Association, a noted social scientist in Canadian Who’s Who and Who’s Who in the World, and an award-winning professor for Excellence in Graduate Teaching at UofT.

Charles is a keynote/plenary speaker and regular presenter at conferences, and a distinguished guest speaker in various academic and professional contexts around the world for more than 170 times/sessions. He is also a featured expert in news media. His works include 6 scholarly/research books, 10 book chapters, and over 50 refereed journal articles. His book “Career Endeavour (Ashgate, 2006)” received the best counselling book award in Canada. According to Google Scholar, Charles is one of the Top 9 most cited authors in literature regarding postmodern constructivist and constructionist studies within the realm of vocational and career psychology.

Affiliation:Professor
Canada Research Chair
Counselling and Clinical Psychology Program
Department of Applied Psychology & Human Development
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE)
University of Toronto


Fanny M Cheung

Fanny M. Cheung

Focus of Lecture: Cultural perspectives in personality assessment

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Psychological Assessment & Evaluation

Abstract: Assessing personality across cultures has highlighted to need for incorporating emic perspectives in assessment. Current personality practices are dominated by western theories and measures which affect the cross-cultural validity of personality assessment. The combined emic-etic approach can fill important gaps in understanding personality from a local perspective while providing the framework for cross-cultural comparison. Research on the Cross-cultural (Chinese) Personality Assessment Inventory illustrates the considerations and procedures for developing an indigenous personality measure using the combined emic-etic approach. Further research confirms the incremental validity of emic dimensions of personality. Other international initiatives using the combined emic-etic approach will also be introduced.

Bio: Fanny Cheung received her BA from the University of California at Berkeley and her PhD from the University of Minnesota. She is currently Vice-President (Research) and Choh-ming Li Professor of Psychology at The Chinese University of Hong Kong. She is Past-President of the ITC (2012-14) and a Fellow of APA and APS.

Highly regarded for her research in cross-cultural personality assessment, Fanny is the translator of the Chinese version of the MMPI, MMPI-2 and MMPI-A, and author of an indigenous personality measure for the Chinese cultural context, the Chinese Personality Assessment Inventory, which was later renamed the Cross-cultural Personality Assessment Inventory (CPAI-2). Her research has raised awareness on the issues of test translation, equivalence and cultural relevance. The combined emic-etic method she adopted in developing the CPAI has raised awareness on cultural perspectives in mainstream psychology, and has inspired the development of other indigenous assessment measures. Fanny’s recent publications include the 2011 article “Toward a new approach to the study of personality in culture” with Van de Vijver and Leong in American Psychologist (pp. 593-603), a co-edited book in 2016 with Leong, F., Gregoire, J. Cheung, F. M. Geisinger, K., Bartram, D., and Iliescu, D. The ITC International Handbook of Testing and Assessment by Oxford University Press (which received the Ursula Gielen Global Psychology Book Award from the Division of International Psychology of the American Psychological Association , 2017) and a co-authored chapter with Fan, W. Q., & Cheung, S. F. on “Indigenous measurement of personality in Asia” in A. T. Church (Ed.). The Praeger Handbook of Personality across Cultures, Vol. I. Trait Psychology across Cultures (pp. 105-135) by ABC-CLIO/Praeger.

Other than her research in cross-cultural personality assessment and Chinese mental health, Fanny has pioneered gender research in Chinese societies. She has served as the Founding Chairperson of the Equal Opportunities Commission in Hong Kong. Her research on gender issues includes violence against women, women leadership and gender equality. She has combined scholarship with public service and advocacy.

Fanny’s psychology awards include APA Presidential Citation in 2004, APA Division 52 Distinguished International Psychologist Award in 2005, and the 2012 American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology and the 2014 IAAP Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions to International Advancement of Applied Psychology.

Fanny has served IAAP actively since the 1990, first as President of Division of Clinical and Community Psychology (1990 – 94), and later as Member of the Board of Directors (2006 – 2018). She has served as a Convenor of the Asian outreach task force, and as a member of the Task Force on Membership and the Working Group on Terms of Service. She is a co-editor of the IAAP Handbook of Applied Psychology (2011) by Wiley-Blackwell.

Affiliation: The Chinese University of Hong Kong


Jean Lau Chin

Jean Lau Chin

Focus of Lecture: Global and Diverse Leadership: Advancing sustainable solutions to change

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract: Leadership today is more important than ever as the 21st century brings about rapid and significant change in society and our institutions. As our communities become increasingly diverse and more connected internationally, we find existing leadership models are not inclusive of all groups; they reflect the prevailing dominant culture and not the leadership of minority and indigenous groups or women. Nor are these models culturally competent for how diverse leaders can be effective with the groups they lead or the outcomes they intend to achieve. Preliminary research (Chin & Trimble, 2014) demonstrate that culture and diversity matters in leadership which, in turn, is influenced by the social identities and lived experiences of leaders and followers, and shaped by cultural values and expectations, and by social and organizational contexts. Few studies of leadership address diverse and culturally competent leadership. We need to move from leadership prototypes and models rooted in narrow Western or Eurocentric paradigms to more complex and multidimensional paradigms. My current research is to examine the leadership styles of diverse leaders and how they are influenced by the social identities, lived experiences, and contexts. Summary of findings from our work will be discussed with implications for what this means for higher education institutions and those interested in leadership. What is the paradigm we should use to examine and assess leadership that is culturally competent and inclusive? How do we consider the effects of social identities, lived experiences, and contexts when assessing or training diverse leaders? Are there cultural specific concepts to consider and how might they emerge in the exercise of leadership? What is successful 21C leadership as our society and communities becomes increasingly global and diverse? Are there effective types of leadership that are not typically identified in the mainstream leadership literature?

Bio: Jean Lau Chin, EdD, ABPP is Professor at Adelphi University in New York, and is 2018 Fulbright Scholar as Distinguished Chair to the University of Sydney, Australia. She has held leadership roles as former Dean at Adelphi University, Systemwide Dean at Alliant International University, Executive Director of South Cove Community Health Center and Co-Director of Thom Mental Health Clinic. Currently, her scholarship is on global and diverse leadership which includes examining women and ethnic minority issues which includes 18 books and many publications and talks. Her most recent is: Global and Culturally Diverse Leaders and Leadership: Challenges for Business, Education and Society. She is the first Asian American to be licensed as a psychologist in Massachusetts and among the top 10 nationally. Active in service to the profession, she is currently Past-Chair, Council Leadership Team of the American Psychological Association and President of the International Council of Psychologists, and running for APA President 2020.

Affiliation: Visiting Professor, Fulbright Scholar as Distinguished Chair,
The National Centre for Cultural Competence, University of Sydney, Australia
Professor, Adelphi University


Helen Christensen

Helen Christensen

Focus of Lecture: TBC

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Clinical Psychology Section

Abstract: Suicide prevention requres the adoption of multi-modal, comprehensive and integrated approaches. Recognising the need for scale and reach, digital technologies, such as websites, apps and sensors have been employed by suicide prevention agencies to assist in suicide prevention. Scientific studies of the effectiveness of these interventions is emerging. In this keynote, the potential domains for the use of these technologies are identified: schools; workplaces; public online environments; primary care/healthcare settings; means restriction; and crisis and aftercare. Examples of the effectiveness of these interventions are described, with a focus on clinical treatment applications, using data from recent randomised controlled trials from the Black Dog Instittue, and research trials from other leading centres. There is more replication required, and more comprehensive consumer informed research to be undertaken. However, these technologies are rapidly expanding ahead of research effectiveness, but, nevertheless have potential to be used as part of larger integrated suicide prevention approaches.

Bio: Professor Christensen is an international leader in the use of technology to deliver evidence-based psychological therapies to communities and individuals who suffer from anxiety or depression, or who are at risk of suicide. Professor Christensen leads the Digital Dog team that is investigating novel methods for detecting mental health risk via social media, and developing novel interventions for mental health treatment. The Digital Dog team focuses on interventions to target depression, suicide risk and to enhance wellbeing. Professor Christensen also leads the LifeSpan trial that will investigate a novel systems approach to suicide prevention in NSW. This trial aims to reduce the number of suicide deaths by 21% and the number of suicide attempts by 30%.

Professor Christensen's research also encompasses prevention of mental health problems in young people through school-based research programs. These programs are aimed at prevention of depression and suicide risk through eMental Health interventions. Professor Christensen has recently published the novel approach to preventing the onset of depression through targeting insomnia with the SHUTi program.

Christensen, H., Batterham, P. J., & Gosling, J. A. (2016). Effectiveness of an online insomnia program (SHUTi) for prevention of depressive episodes (the GoodNight Study): a randomised controlled trial (vol 3, pg 333, 2016). LANCET PSYCHIATRY, 3(4), 320-320.

Affiliation: Scientia Professor Helen Christensen is Director and Chief Scientist at the Black Dog Institute and a Professor of Mental Health at UNSW


Saths Cooper

Saths Cooper

Focus of Lecture: Back To The Future: International Psychology

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Clinical Psychology Section; Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity

Abstract: Tracing the history of international psychology from its origins some 130 years ago to the current state of the discipline globally, this address will advocate for a more inclusive and humanistic consideration of the human condition. The presentation will traverse the urgent issues confronting humanity in its diversity, convergence and quest for social stability, economic certainty, environmental sustainability and peace. The argument will be made for a more compassionate psychology that reflects all of humanity while underpinning the necessity for constant relevance, societal benefit, scientific credibility and increased understanding.

Bio: Saths Cooper is a Fellow of the psychological societies of South Africa, India, Ireland and the UK. A close associate of the late Steve Biko, he played a key role in the anti-apartheid struggle, was jailed for 9 years - spending 5 in the same Robben Island cell-block as Nelson Mandela - and was declared a "victim of gross human rights violations" by South Africa's Truth & Reconciliation Commission. The recipient of many citations and awards, he was Principal of the University of Durban-Westville, and holds professorial appointments at the Universities of Pretoria, Limpopo and Johannesburg.

Affiliation: President of the International Union of Psychological Science (IUPsyS) and the Pan-African Psychology Union (PAPU) and Vice President of the International Social Science Council (ISSC)


German Antonio Gutierrez Dominguez

German Antonio Gutierrez Dominguez

Focus of Lecture: Comparative psychology of sexual behavior: From basic processes to applied settings

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Clinical; Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity

Abstract:

Bio:

Affiliation: National University of Colombia


Maria Eduarda Duarte

Maria Eduarda Duarte

Focus of Lecture: “Work and days”: the freedoms and the restraints to promote a decent life

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Counselling Division

Abstract: The nature of work nowadays presents a wealth of challenges for career counseling, including for this exercise the recognition of the plurality of knowledge-based cultures and contexts. The opening section is centered on the idea that cultural or contextual issues represent pieces which are integral to the puzzle of career counseling, rather than being something that can be isolated. Through this perspective, career counseling processes are understood as being dependent on specific cultural and contextual aspects that must be taken into consideration throughout the entire counseling process. A second purpose is to evaluate the gaps found between theory and practice effectiveness. To close these gaps, i.e., connecting science to solutions, a more determined approach to the strategic impact of counseling must be taken, expanding focus out from individual research into a broader base, therein incorporating solutions that highlight indigenous perspectives conceptualized reflexively and dialogically.

Bio: M. Eduarda Duarte is Full Professor at the University of Lisbon, Faculty of Psychology, where she directs the Master Course in Psychology of Human Resources, Work, and Organizations. Her professional interests include career psychology theory and research, with special emphasis on issues relevant to adults and the world of work. She is research director of Career Guidance and Development of Human Resources Services. Her publications and presentations have encompassed topics on adult’s career problems, testing and assessment, and counselling process. She is since 2005 Chair of the Portuguese Psychological Society; she also served on editorial boards for some Portuguese, European, and Iberia-American journals. She was the Director of the National Institute of Guidance (2009-2014). She is President of Counselling Division, IAAP. She is Fellow Award – IAAP (2014), and ESVDC award 2015. She is also National Defence Adviser, since 2006.

Affiliation: University of Lisbon, Portugal


Andrew Elliot

Andrew Elliot

Focus of Lecture: Competition and achievement outcomes: A hierarchical motivational analysis

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Educational, School & Instructional

Abstract: In my talk, I will provide a conceptual overview of the hierarchical model of achievement motivation, and I will apply this model to competitive striving. The hierarchical model distinguishes between two aspects of motivation – energization (general competitive desire) and direction (pursuit of specific performance-based goals) – and integrates them together into an overarching model of competition. I will present a series of studies showing that competitive desires lead to both performance-approach and performance-avoidance goal pursuit, and that these two goals have an opposite impact on achievement-relevant outcomes. I will end my talk by discussing implications for real-world achievement contexts.

Bio: Andrew J. Elliot is Professor of Psychology at the University of Rochester. He has held Visiting Professor positions at Cambridge University, King Abdulaziz University, Oxford University, and the University of Munich, and has been a Visiting Fellow at Churchill College (Cambridge) and Jesus College (Oxford). He received his Ph. D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1994. His research focuses on achievement motivation and approach-avoidance motivation. He is currently editor of Advances in Motivation Science, and has over 200 scholarly publications. He has received multiple awards for his teaching and research contributions to both educational and social-personality psychology. He has given keynote or university addresses in more than 20 different countries, and his lab regularly hosts professors, post-docs, and graduate students from around the globe.

Affiliation: University of Rochester


Fang Fang

Fang Fang

Focus of Lecture: Attention Maps In Human Brain

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract: In everyday life, our brain is faced with the critical challenge of selecting the most relevant fraction of external inputs at the expense of less relevant information. Attenion is widely acknowledged to be responsible for this selection process in which the saliency map and the priority map are two key components. Both the maps describe the topographic representation of attentional allocation. The saliency map is primarily based on bottom-up phyiscal inputs, while the priority map is determined by both bottom-up and top-down signals. In the first part of this talk, combining psychophysics, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), event-related potential (ERP), and computational modeling, we demontrate that the saliency maps from artificial and natural images are created in early visual cortex, especially in V1. In the second part, based on the properties of V1 neurons and the principle of information maximization, we propose a computational saliency map model to simulate human saccadic scanpaths on natural images, which outperforms many other models. In the third part, we use the fMRI population receptive field (pRF) mapping technique and eye tracking technique, and show that the priority maps of natural images could be be found in early visual cortex, including V1-V3. Taken together, these findings provide converging evidence that the neural substrate of attention maps (including the saliency map and the priority map) could be located in human early visual cortex and signficantly extend traditional attention theories that emphazise that only the parietal and frontal cortices are responsible for generating attention.

Bio: Dr. Fang Fang is Chang Jiang Professor of Psychology, dean of the School of Psychological and Cognitive Sciences, director of Beijing Key Laboratory of Behavior and Mental Health, and executive associate director of the IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research at Peking University. He obtained a Ph.D. in Cognitive and Biological Psychology at the University of Minnesota in 2006, and was a Postdoctoral Research Associate between 2006 and 2007. His research seeks to understand the neural mechanisms of visual and cognitive processes by combining neuroimaging, psychophysical and computational techniques. Topics under investigation include object and face perception, visual adaptation and learning, visual attention and awareness. He received the Young Investigaor Award: Basic Science from the International Union of Psychological Science (IUPsyS) in 2016. He currently serves on the editorial board for Current Biology, Experimental Brain Research, Frontiers in Perception Science and Science China: Life Sciences.

Affiliation: School of Psychological and Cognitive Sciences, IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Peking University, Beijing, P.R. China


Rocío Fernández-Ballesteros

Rocío Fernández-Ballesteros

Focus of Lecture: Longevity and Behavior

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract:The exponential increase in life expectancy since the mid-nineteenth century and the continuation of this trend has been explained through the socio-economic, educational and technological developments. Explanations for this unexpected phenomena favour environmental above genetic reasons. Thus, bio-demographers pointed out that population analyses "indicate that genetic differences between individuals account for 20-25% of variation in lifespan…which, in effect, allows us to estimate that 75-80% are attributable to environmental conditions” without specify in what extent behaviours is an important factor of the environment. This is also supported when examining the inter-individual and generational differences in intellectual functioning throughout the twentieth century, the cross-sectional or the longitudinal studies in which the drop-out effect is examined, as well as the studies of cognitive epidemiology. Moreover, WHO pointed out that behavioural life styles as well as personal psychological conditions such as copying with stress, personality traits (such as consciousness), emotional stability and positivity and psychosocial conditions are potentially determinant of Active Aging. Thus, a transactional socio-cognitive perspective it is plausible to see behavioural factors being responsible to some extent for longevity and survival. This presentation will deal with all empirical evidence from cross-sectional, longitudinal, cohort and experimental research supportive that behavioural conditions are intervening factors of longevity.

Bio: Prof. Dra. Rocío Fernández-Ballesteros García
Emeritus Professor at the Universidad Autonoma of Madrid. Ph.D. in Political Science and Sociology. Clinical Psychologist. Author or Editor of 29 books (among them the Encyclopedia of Psychological Assessment, Sage; Active Aging. Contribution of Psychology, Hogrefe; Cambridge Handbook of Successful Aging) and more than 300 articles published in high impact Journals or Edited books and Encyclopedias of Psychology and Gerontology. Program evaluator of National and International Organizations (UNESCO, European Union). Served as Expert: the United Nation and UNECE (2001-2008) and for the WHO for Active Ageing. A Policy Framework (2001-02). Founder and Editor-in Chief of the European Journal of Psychological Assessment (1985-2008); Associated Editor of the European Journal of Ageing and of the European Psychologist journal. Founder and first President (1992-1998) of the European Association of Psychological Assessment (EAPA). Founder and First Chair of the Task Force of GeroPsychology (2003-2009) of the European Federation of Psychologists Associations (EFPA); Member of the Board of Director of the International Association of Apply Psychology (IAAP, 1990-2005) and President of the Psychological Assessment Division (1994-2002) and of Division 7-Social Gerontology (2004-08) and Member of the Spanish Academy of Psychology (since 2015). She has received several Awards and Prizes, among others: the Aristotle Prize (EFPA, 2005), IAAP-Distinguished Contribution-IAAP (2006), Outstanding Contribution from EAPA (2009), Huarte de San Juan Award (COP-CyL, 2007) https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rocio_Fernandez-Ballesteros

Affiliation: Autonoma University of Madrid


Ian Freckelton

Ian Freckelton

Focus of Lecture: Scholarly Misconduct: Challenges for Psychology

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Division 10: Psychology and Law

Abstract: Controversies in relation to the conduct of research periodically afflict all of the sciences. However, there are objective signs that the problems in relation to scholarly misconduct are deepening in a troubling way. Retractions in scholarly journals, including those which are highly regarded, are becoming more common; high profile scandals afflict disciplines and sub-disciplines alike, including within psychology; and arguments are proliferating about how most effectively ethical standards can be improved and investigations into allegations of misconduct can be undertaken with fairness to all. Psychology has not been prominent in the phenomenon of research misconduct, the conduct of Professor Stapel in The Netherlands providing very important opportunities for the learning of lessons - by bothe the profession and by psychologists generally. However, there is no shortage of other cases which have relevance for psychologists in avoiding temptations for short-cuts, in ensuring ethical collaboration, and for the fostering of a culture of ethical propriety. A series of international issues, some of which have even involved the preferring of criminal charges, will be scrutinised and an attempt made to reflect upon how psychology can learn from the scandals and crises of the past decade to build a more robust culture of research rigour and integrity.

Bio: Ian Freckelton is a Queen's Counsel in full time practice in Australia, a judge of the Supreme Court of Nauru, and a Professorial Fellow of Law and Psychiatry at the University of Melbourne. He is a former Professor of Forensic Psychology at Monash University, and is the Editor-in-Chief of Psychiatry, Psychology and Law and the Editor of the Journal of Law and Medicine. He is the author and editor of more than 40 books and over 600 peer reviewed articles and chapters of books. Ian is a member of Victoria's Mental Health Tribunal and of its Coronial Council. He is an elected Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia, the Australian Academy of Law, and the Australasian College of Legal Medicine. He is a former President of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Psychiatry, Psychology and Law and was for many years the lawyer member of Victoria's Psychologists Registration Board. Among Ian's most recent books are Scholarly Misconduct (OUP, 2016), Tensions and Traumas in Health Law (Federation Press, 2017) and Expert Evidence (Thomson Reuters, 2018).

Affiliation: Barristers’ Clerk Howells


Marta Fülöp

Márta Fülöp

Focus of Lecture: Competition: A Favorable Or An Evil Phenomenon?

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract: Acquiring the skills necessary to compete effectively is of considerable value in competitive societies. To maintain psychological and somatic health while competing effectively has paramount significance at the societal, institutional, family and individual level. It has been suggested that rising rates of psychopathology in Western societies might be linked to increases in competitive behavior (e.g. James, 1998). Research also suggests that rates of psychological ill-health are higher in competitive societies (Arrindell et al., 2003, 2004). In educational settings competition has been considered to heighten the level of anxiety/threat (Shindler, 2009) and to be a major cause of school stress (e.g. Humphrey & Humphrey 1985). Spence et al. (1987) found excessive competitiveness to have detrimental effects on students’ health. However, In the last two decades researchers started to deconstruct competitiveness and identify different types of competitive attitudes with different psychological and somatic health outcomes.
Is being competitive a risk at somebody’s psychological and somatic health? Does avoiding competition prevent somebody from these risks? Is competition avoidance healthy? Is it the nature of the competitive orientation that causes these beneficial or detrimental outcomes or the direction is just the opposite: the degree and nature of psychological health shapes the attitude towards competition? Is it the interaction between personal competitiveness and the degree of external (situational) competitiveness what has an effect on health and well-being?
The instant reactions to winning and losing seem to be hard wired (Tracy and Matsumoto, 2008). Winning and losing are part of the competitive process. Is it possible to identify different patterns of coping with winning and losing? Do the emotional and behavioral reactions to winning and losing and their combination relate to psychological and somatic health? Do these patterns change across the lifespan?
The talk will provide answers to these questions based on studies in different age groups and in groups with different sociodemographic indicators. It aims to promote a highly differentiated view on the role that competition and winning and losing play in psychological and somatic well-being.

Bio: Prof. Márta Fülöp (DSc) is scientific advisor and head of the Social and Cultural Psychology Department of the Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (HAS). She is also professor of social psychology and the head of the Social Interaction: Competition and Cooperation Research Group in the Faculty of Psychology and Education, Eötvös Loránd University of Budapest (ELTE).
She was research fellow of Japan Foundation (1996-1997), a Lindzey Fellow (1997-1998) in the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, USA, a visiting professor at the Faculty of Sociology and Social Psychology, Kansai University, Osaka, Japan (2004), and she has been a visiting professor in the University of International Business and Economy in Beijing, China since 2013. She is the Secretary General of the International Association of Cross-Cultural Psychology (IACCP) and Secretary of International Affairs of the Hungarian Psychological Association. She has been member of the Executive Committee of Children’s Identity and Citizenship in Europe SOCRATES Academic Network for almost two decades (1998-2017). She is Research and Publication Officer of Children’s Identity and Citizenship in Europe: European Association. She is the Hungarian regional representative in ISSBD and organized a successful regional ISSBD workshop in 2013 in Budapest. She is the editor-in-chief of the Hungarian Review of Psychology (Magyar Pszichológiai Szemle) the major scientific journal of psychology in Hungary. She is associate editor of the Citizenship, Teaching and Learning journal (Intellect, UK) and member (among others) of the editorial board of European Psychologist and the International Perspectives in Psychology: Research, Practice & Consultation (APA). She is also the representative of the Hungarian Psychological Association in OSNI of EFPA (European Federation of Psychological Associations). She has served as member of the scientific committee of international conferences more than 20 times and has been invited speaker more than 15 times in different international conferences (IACCP 2014, ICAP 2014, IUPS 2012, ECHA 2014, ECDP 2015 etc.). She has participated in numerous large scale cross-cultural studies being responsible for the Hungarian data and interpretation.
Her main research topic is competition and she studies competition from many different aspects: developmental, social, cross-cultural. She has studies on the perception of competition in a post-socialist society (Hungary) among diverse groups i.e. students, teachers, business people. She has done cross-cultural comparative studies among others on the construction of the meaning of competition in different societies e.g. Japan, on the psychology of adaptive and non-adaptive coping with winning and losing also on cross-cultural perspective, competition in old age, and competitiveness and psychological and somatic health. She has more than 490 publications, 2300 independent citations.

Affiliation: International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology


Tommy Garling

Tommy Gärling

Focus of Lecture: Urban Travel: Interfaces with Psychology

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Division 4: Environmental Psychology

Abstract: Why do people travel? How do people travel? How are people influenced by travel? After briefly addressing the first two questions, I present research investigating how psychological well-being is influenced by daily travel in urban areas. An overview is first given of different conceptualizations of psychological well-being as cognitive judgements of satisfaction and experienced emotions, and their possible relation to travel. This is followed by a presentation of the methods that have been developed to measure travel-related well-being including self-report measures of attitude towards travel obtained before travel, measures of mood and emotions obtained during travel, and measures of mood and satisfaction obtained after travel. Urban travel is a frequent activity taking up much of the time of the daily lives of many people, in particular those in the work force and students commuting to their work places. It may therefore be appropriate to consider satisfaction with travel as a domain satisfaction that to some degree like other domain satisfactions influences overall life satisfaction. The results are presented of several surveys using different methods to show how satisfaction with travel and indirectly overall life satisfaction are influenced in different segments of the population by travel time, travel mode, in-vehicle activities, and interruptions. Different interpretations of these findings are discussed to give a coherent picture of the role of psychological factors in urban travel.

Bio: Research Council of Humanities and Social Sciences and Director of the Transportation Research Unit at Umeå University, he was in 1992 appointed as Professor of Psychology at University of Gothenburg, Göteborg. He held this position until 2008 when he became Emeritus Professor.

Tommy Gärling has conducted research in five main areas, judgment and decision making (basic research on different topics related to evaluations and emotions), environmental psychology (spatial cognition; childhood accidents; residential choice; restorative effects of natural environments; pro-environmental values, attitudes and behavior), econonomic psychology and behavioral economics/finance (money perception and perceived inflation; sustainable investments and values; herding in stock markets; effects of bonus systems on investors´ short-sightedness; consumers’ trust in and satisfaction with financial institutions), travel behavior (computational process models of interrelated activity/travel choice; evaluation of transport policies to reduce car use; attractiveness of public transport; how travel influences satisfaction and emotions ), and consumer behavior, marketing and retailing (replacement purchases of cars; attractiveness and accessibility of stores for grocery shopping).

Tommy Gärling is the editor or co-editor of 11 books and has authored and co-authored more than 250 papers published in peer-reviewed international journals in psychology, applied psychology (environmental and economic psychology), transportation, geography and planning, economics, and consumer behavior, close to 100 book chapters including five invited chapters for handbooks of environmental psychology, economic psychology, consumer behavior, and transportation, and a large number of other publications in both English and Swedish.

Tommy Gärling was member of the scientific committee of the international congress of psychology in Stockholm 2000 being responsible for The Dag Hammarskjöld memorial symposia on diplomacy and psychology with participation of UN deputy director Jan Eliasson and a large number of top-level psychology researchers. In 2002 he co-organized one of the biannual conferences of the European Association of Decision Making. He has also co-organized another five international conferences on various topics and has convened more than 10 invited symposia. He has been invited keynote speaker at seven international conferences and presented his research more than 300 times at international conferences.

From 1998 to 2002 Tommy Gärling was president of the environmental psychology division of the International Association of Applied Psychology and in 2014 he became fellow of the association. He is a former member of the board of the International Association of Travel Behavior Research. He has been an associate editor of Journal of Economic Psychology and member of the editorial boards of Journal of Environmental Psychology, Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly Journal of Socio-Economics), Spatial Cognition & Computation, and Transportation.

Affiliation: Emeritus Professor of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden


Nicola Gavey

Nicola Gavey

Focus of Lecture: Sexual violence, gender politics and #MeToo

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Sponsoring Division/Section: SWAP (Section on Women and Psychology)

Abstract: Something remarkable is happening to the cultural politics of rape. Since scandal erupted over Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein’s reported serial sexual harassment and assault in late 2017, testimonies, commentaries, and stories of protest have saturated mainstream media. As an observer of anti-rape politics since 1970 (in vivo since the mid-1980s and via the archives for before that), I was initially sceptical about the novelty and significance of this new “hashtag activist” #MeToo movement. However, just a few months in I started to change my mind. There is something about the tenor and scale of what is happening that demands we take notice. In the eyes of serious journalists in high profile mainstream media, as well as celebrity and expert commentators, we are experiencing “a transformational moment in [American] sexual politics”, “a radical national reappraisal of gender relations” – indeed “the fastest-moving social change we’ve seen in decades”, a “rebellion of epic proportion”, an “earthquake”. These observations do not, of course, count as evidence of any such momentous change. But the language itself strikes a sharply different note from the way both sexual violence (as the social problem) and gender relations (as they arguably contribute to the “cultural scaffolding” of sexual violence) have been publicly discussed in recent decades. In this talk I will discuss the significance of what we are witnessing, in relation to my contemporaneous revisiting of my 2005 analysis of the cultural scaffolding of rape in light of social change since that time. I will traverse themes such as the role of digital technology, the increasing visibility of sexism and misogyny, the place of scandals, and the complicated gender politics of sexual violence.

Bio: Nicola Gavey is a professor in the School of Psychology at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. Her research has focussed on understanding the connection between sexual violence and everyday taken for granted norms around gender and sexuality. She is currently working on a second edition of her 2005 book Just sex? The cultural scaffolding of rape (which received a Distinguished Publication Award from the U.S. Association for Women in Psychology). She is also interested in ways of fostering change. From 2012 to 2016 she led a Marsden-funded project that aimed to revitalize public conversations in New Zealand about the sexism, misogyny, and racism within, and beyond, mainstream pornography (www.sexualpoliticsnow.org.nz). From 2008-2013 she was editor of Feminism & Psychology (SAGE, London), which received a 2013 Distinguished Leadership Award from the American Psychological Association’s Committee on Women in Psychology. Her current research includes collaborative projects on image-based sexual abuse, the gendered dimensions of sexting, and finding ways to engage boys in helping to create more ethical landscapes for intimate digital communication and gender relations more broadly.

Affiliation: The University of Auckland, New Zealand


Henk Geertsema

Henk Geertsema

Focus of Lecture: Autonomy of the client: a challenge for psychologists

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract: Autonomy is a central concept in many ethical documents for psychologists. But what does it exactly refer to? Sometimes autonomy is interpreted rather strictly and individualistic, while at other times its interpretation is broader and more relation-oriented. The concept of autonomy will be discussed from various philosophical perspectives from different regions in the world. In addition, attention will be paid to the implications of these different perspectives for interventions by psychologists.
These issues seem particularly relevant to psychologists working with elderly people expressing a death wish. What does respecting the autonomy of the client mean in this situation?
Various interpretations will be presented with a particular focus on the professional and personal values of psychologists. In this context values as the dignity of the client and the value of life in general cannot be overlooked.

Bio: Henk Geertsema, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, has worked for many years with clients in elderly care. Nowadays he is Programme Director Continous Education and focusses on teaching, both to physicians and psychologists working in elderly care. In addition, he is one of the founders of the multidisciplinary Center for Decision Making Capacity at the VU University Medical Center.
Apart from his expertise in the field of geropsychology, he is considered to be an expert with regards to professionalism, more specifically professional ethics. He writes for the magazine of the NIP, the Dutch Association of Psychologistst, on disciplinary court rulings. He is also preparing a book on ethics for Dutch colleagues in the field.
For many years he was the chair of the Board of Ethics from the NIP. Currently he is the convenor of the Board of Ethics of the European Federation of Psychological Associations (EFPA).

Affiliation: VU University medical center, Amsterdam


Polli Hagenaars

Polli Hagenaars

Focus of Lecture: Psychology, a human rights profession - 1948-2018, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract:Is knowledge used to include some and exclude others?’ Michèle Lamont, Erasmus Award, 2017.
In 1948, after the horrors of WWII, the Universal Declaration on Human Rights (UDHR) set standards for equality, dignity, inclusion, and freedom of development. Now 70 years later, inequality, dehumanizing practices, discrimination and adverse living conditions still exist for countless people.
According to the UNHCR, we are witnessing the highest levels of displacement on record: an unprecedented 65.6 million people around the world have been forced from home. Among them are nearly 22.5 million refugees, over half of whom are under the age of 18. Over 150 million children, aged between 5 and 17, are subject to child labour. The latest findings of the EU Fundamental Rights Agency show that even in the affluent EU countries, discrimination continues to affect large numbers of ethnic minorities and immigrants. Extreme right politicians preach old-fashioned racism, trying to deprive migrants and minority group citizens of their rights.
In this presentation, it will be argued that the science and practice of psychology is particularly well suited to protect and promote the principles and values of human rights. Some critical issues will be discussed as well: the in- or exclusive nature of psychological theory and research, and the ethical implications of human rights for the practice of psychologists.
Psychologists by virtue of their knowledge and skills, as individuals and through their associations, have a special responsibility for human rights and an ethical obligation to defend and promote them, not only in the practice room but also in the public debate.

Bio: Polli Hagenaars is a licensed healthcare psychologist, a lecturer in post-academic courses, supervisor, and a trainer of diversity and non-discrimination in her own institute in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
She is the convenor (2013-2017) and still a member of the Board Human Rights and Psychology (BHR&Psy) of the European Federation of Psychologists’ Associations (EFPA).
She was part of the team that organised the expert meeting ‘Human Rights Education for Psychologists’ (see: humanrightsforpsychologists.eu).
She also has been (2016-2017) a member of the APA ‘Commission on Ethics Processes’ (after the Hoffman Report). Her interests and publications include: diversity, exclusion, identity, resilience, human rights, social responsibility of psychologists, and ethics in a broader professional context.

Affiliation: Convener, Board Human Rights & Psychology of the European Federation of Psychologists’ Associations (EFPA)


Stevan E. Hobfoll

Stevan E. Hobfoll

Focus of Lecture: Terrorism Threat: Trauma, Resilience and Political Decay

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Clinical, Community

Abstract: In the face of terrorism, rocket attacks and war, people react with a range of emotions from deeply experienced distress to an amazing level of resilience. At the same time, the politics of fear can be seen as producing a shift to a more right wing, militant stance, especially in those who begin with a more right wing approach to politics. The study of stress and trauma has focused on pathological responses, and seldom examined either resilience or political reactivity, despite politics being one way we cope with threat. We examine terrorist attacks and other mass casualty circumstances around the world in light of how to better define resilience, resistance, and recovery, as well as how threat and loss is impacting our political selves. In so doing the epidemiology of resilience, how it might be defined, and how it should be explored in future research is explored. This work is critical for broadening our theoretical understanding of people’s responding to trauma, key to public health intervention, and carries enormous potential for building a Psychology of Human Strength in the face of adversity that has been absent in trauma studies. Our work on the consequences of terrorism, mass conflict and war from the World Trade Center attacks, Israel and Palestine will be presented. This more complex understanding of impact, resilience, and resistance suggests important roles for individual differences in vulnerability and resiliency-related characteristics, as well as the influence of key situational differences in levels of exposure, the chronicity of exposure, and environmental contingencies.

Bio: Dr. Stevan Hobfoll has authored and edited 12 books, including TRAUMATIC STRESS, THE ECOLOGY OF STRESS, STRESS CULTURE AND COMMUNITY, and THE IMPERFECT GUARDIAN (an historical novel set in Eastern Europe at the time of WWI). In addition, he has authored over 250 journal articles, book chapters, and technical reports. He has been a frequent workshop leader on stress, war, and terrorism, stress and health, and organizational stress. He has received over $18 million in research grants on stress. Dr. Hobfoll is currently the Judd and Marjorie Weinberg Presidential Professor and Chair of the Department of Behavioral Sciences at Rush Medical College in Chicago, joining Rush in 2008. His current research focuses on trauma in zones of conflict and on the connection between stress and biological-health outcomes in women’s lives.

Dr. Hobfoll was a Senior Fellow of the Center for National Security Studies at the University of Haifa, Israel. Formerly at Tel Aviv and Ben Gurion Universities, and an officer in the Israeli Defense Forces, he remains involved with the problem of stress in Israel. Dr. Hobfoll was cited by the Encyclopædia Britannica for his contribution to knowledge and understanding for his Ecology of Stress. He was co-chair of the American Psychological Association Commission on Stress and War during Operation Desert Storm, helping plan for the prevention of prolonged distress among military personnel and their families, a member of the U.S. Disaster Mental Health Subcommittee of the National Biodefense Science Board (NBSB), and a member of APA’s Task Force on Resilience in Response to Terrorism. Dr. Hobfoll published the first randomized clinical trial on the prevention of HIV/AIDS in women. He has been a consultant to several nations, military organizations, and major corporations on problems of stress and health.

Professor Hobfoll has been honored with multiple lifetime achievement awards for work on traumatic stress, and work on stress and health. His work has made a difference in millions of people’s lives around the world, believing that academia must be a beacon of light for the world, not an ivory tower. He was honored by the State of Ohio for implementation of efforts to protect poor women of color from violence and disease in Ohio. His work was selected as a model program by both the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control for translation of research to effective intervention in inner-city women’s lives, especially addressing violence and physical health. His work on mass casualty intervention was designated as one of the most influential recent contributions to psychiatry. His 5 principles of mass casualty intervention paper (Hobfoll, Watson, et al., 2007) was selected by the Psychiatry Journal Focus as one of the most influential recent papers in psychiatry. Indeed, this blueprint is the world standard for mass casualty intervention and treatment of refugees throughout the world, adopted by dozens of countries, the World Health Organization and hundreds of NGOs (h-index 74; 35000 citations, 10/17).

Affiliation: The Judd and Marjorie Weinberg Presidential Professor and Chair
Professor of Behavioral Sciences, Medicine, Preventive Medicine & Nursing Science
Department of Behavioral Sciences
Rush University Medical Center


Anita Hubley

Anita Hubley

Focus of Lecture: Missed opportunities in testing and assessment: Consequences, side effects, and response processes

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Psychological Assessment & Evaluation

Abstract: The purpose of this presentation is to highlight two critically important, but often misunderstood and neglected, sources of validity evidence that book-end the measurement process: (a) response processes, and (b) test consequences. A key challenge in measurement involves capturing attributes, observations, or experiences using numbers, with as little error as possible. What are respondents thinking and doing as they respond to our measures? Are they interpreting items in the way that was intended theoretically? Does the response format capture their desired response? Do the mechanisms that underlie what people do, think, or feel when interacting with, and responding to, an item or task match what we would expect theoretically for the construct of interest? How are response processes different from test content as a source of validity evidence? I will discuss what response processes are (and are not), methods for collecting this source of validity evidence, and their role in validation. We not only want to accurately capture attributes, observations, or experiences with our measures, we want the inferences we make from these measures to have impact. We use test scores in research, clinical, and applied settings to understand valued cultural phenomena, build theories, make decisions, or evaluate interventions. Whether the measures we use are high stakes or not, they have implications for individuals, groups, and society. What are the intended consequences and unintended side effects of using measures legitimately in different contexts? What is the impact of consequences on the validity of inferences made from these measures? Response processes and the consequences and side effects of legitimate test use highlight missed opportunities in testing and assessment. It is time for us to pay more attention to the complex interaction of the respondent, the measure, and the context in which we administer, interpret, and use measures.

Bio: Dr. Anita Hubley is a Full Professor in the Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education at the University of British Columbia (UBC), where she is Coordinator of the Measurement, Evaluation, and Research Methodology program, member of the Counselling Psychology program, and Director of the Adult Development and Psychometrics Lab. She earned her Ph.D. in Psychology in 1995, specializing in human assessment. Dr. Hubley is recognized internationally for her expertise in test development, validity, and psychological and health assessment and measurement across the adult lifespan, including with vulnerable populations. She has published over 95 academic articles and book chapters on these topics, particularly as they relate to neuropsychology, quality of life, depression, age identity, and homelessness. She has also developed several clinical, health, and psychological tests, including the Memory Test for Older Adults, Modified Taylor Complex Figure, and Quality of Life in Homeless and Hard-to-House Individuals measure, to name just a few. She is a former member of the Executive Council of the International Test Commission (ITC) – which provides guidance in testing practices to individuals and organizations around the world, and former Editor of the ITC’s publication "Testing International". Her keynote address is informed by her recently published and co-edited book, "Understanding and Investigating Response Processes in Validation Research", and reflects her work on response processes and consequences of testing as sources of validity evidence.

Affiliation: University of British Columbia


Dragos Iliescu

Dragos Iliescu

Focus of Lecture: On the Equivalence of Measurement Instruments across Languages and Cultures: Between Ignorance and Half-Hearted Acceptance

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Psychological Assessment & Evaluation

Abstract: The presentation delves into the realm of test adaptation (or test localization, test indigenization), a scientific and professional activity which now spans the whole realm of the social and behavioural sciences. Adapting tests to various linguistic and cultural contexts is a critical process in today's globalized world and combines knowledge and skills from such domains as psychometrics, cross-cultural psychology and others. Cross-cultural equivalence (invariance) of the adapted form with the original form is the indicator of a valid test adaptation. Such evidence should be provided by any scientific work based on, or including adapted measures. This requirement is however largely ignored in publications, and in many cases is only half-heartedly and incompletely followed. The presentation will discuss various sub-optimal practices and biases resulted from the these practices, as well as recommendations for good practice in this important domain.

Bio: Dragos Iliescu is a Professor of Psychology with the University of Bucharest in Romania. His research interests group around two domains: psychological and educational assessment, tests and testing (with an important cross-cultural component), and applied (I/O) psychology. He has consulted on various international projects related to test adaptation and assessment on all the 5 continents. He is the current President (2016-2018) of the International Test Commission (ITC). Two of his latest publications are The ITC International Handbook of Testing and Assessment (2016, Oxford University Press, co-editor with Frederick Leong, Dave Bartram, Fanny Cheung, Kurt Geisinger) and Adapting Tests in Linguistic and Cultural Situations (2017, Cambridge University Press).

Affiliation: University of Bucharest


Barbel Knauper

Bärbel Knäuper

Focus of Lecture: Innovations in Behavioral Weight Loss Programs

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Division 8: Health Psychology

Abstract: Nearly one third of the world population is currently overweight or obese. Intensive behavioral weight loss programs like the Diabetes Prevention Program have been shown to be effective when delivered one-on-one but are too expensive to scale up to the large number of individuals in need. Group-based programs and online delivered programs tend to not result in clinically relevant weight loss and/or the participants regain the lost weight after the program ends. Recent advances in behavioral techniques and technologies to increase the effectiveness of behavioral weight loss programs will be described. Furthermore, it will be described how behavioral weight loss programs can be personalized to the needs of individuals and optimized for specific populations such as emotional eaters. An integrated theoretical model for weight loss maintenance that can be translated into personalized interventions for sustained weight loss will be proposed.

Bio: Dr. Knäuper is a Professor of Psychology and the Director of the Health Psychology Laboratory in the Department of Psychology at McGill University. Her research focuses on developing effective and scalable interventions for health behaviour change. She examines the processes of habit formation and develops theory-derived clinical interventions to change maladaptive habits in patients with chronic diseases. For example, she is currently developing and evaluating the effectiveness of behavioral weight loss programs that target specific populations (e.g., emotional eaters). She also works on developing behavioral interventions that can be effectively and efficiently delivered by health care professionals who are not experts in behavior change (e.g. physicians, nurses, or dietitians). Other projects of hers include the promotion of sufficient sleep in adolescents, the effects of mindfulness interventions on weight loss success and maintenance, the promotion of physical activity, and the improvement of medication adherence.

Affiliation: McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada


SpeakerName

Judy Kuriansky

Focus of Lecture: How Far We’ve Come and Where We’re Going in Global Mental Health and Well-being: The Good News that Psychologists in All Divisions and Disciplines Need to Know to Get Their Work Supported

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Psychology and Societal Development

Abstract: This spoken presentation covers major advances as a result of effective advocacy on the international stage that impact psychologists of all disciplines, and also outlines next steps that must be taken and ways in which psychologists can be involved. Major documents agreed upon by governments include that, for the first time, mental health and wellbeing is included in the new global Agenda for sustainable development, and psychosocial recovery is included in the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. Now, psychologists need to increase advocacy, research, and programmes to address these topics, including “psychosocial resilience” (given the major hurricanes in the Caribbean and other natural disasters worldwide); emotional trauma of refugees (given negotiations about the Global Compact on Refugees); well-being (given the Global Dialogue on Happiness); poverty eradication (given the global focus to “leave no one behind”); and technology tools and artificial intelligence to close the mental health gap. Countries supportive of mental health and well-being, working with IAAP, will be identified, including Belgium, Bahrain and Canada, whose Prime Minister and Minister of Finance are publicly supportive of mental health. New opportunities include to: get support for such programmes that can serve as best-practices that can be scaled up and replicated; establish assessments to track progress; and create partnerships with governments and other stakeholders. This presentation is relevant to several ICAP streams, including psychology and society (economic and political psychology), work, assessment and evaluation, and equity, diversity and inclusion. Videos will be shown.

Bio:

Affiliation: United Nations Representative, International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP) and Professor, Columbia University Teachers College


Hon. Mike Lake, PC, MP

Hon. Mike Lake, PC, MP, Edmonton-Wetaskiwin

Focus of Lecture: Expect More - An Autism Adventure

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract: Mike Lake is the Canadian Member of Parliament for Edmonton-Wetaskiwin, currently serving his fourth term. He has two children, a son Jaden, 22, and daughter Jenae, 18. The Lakes have been active supporters of autism organizations, families and individuals around the world, while sharing their story of life with Jaden, who has autism. His mission is to challenge us to think differently, not only about people with autism, but about everyone we connect with. Mike has spoken to spouses of world leaders at the United Nations, 15,000 students at WE Day, teachers from across Canada, and thousands of university students. He has done a TEDx Talk and has had the opportunity to travel internationally, meeting with fellow elected officials from across the political spectrum, as well as leaders in the global research community. Mike’s presentation uses video from interviews and news stories centered around his son. Although Jaden is non-verbal, his story enlightens people in ways that words cannot. Mike takes us on a journey through the past eight years of Jaden’s life, demonstrating the power of inclusion as a key to unlocking otherwise undiscovered human potential. The clips, intertwined with Mike’s compelling story-telling, shape together a narrative that resonates with audiences of all ages and from all backgrounds. In the end, his goal is to use Jaden's story to change the way we think about the people around us - their abilities, their challenges and the unique contributions that they can make to the great benefit of all of us.

Presenters:

Esther Rhee, National Program Director, Autism Speaks

Jonathan Weiss, Associate Professor, York University

Nathalie Garcin, PhD Clinical psychologist; Principal, Clinique Spectrum

Stelios Georgiades, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster Unviersity; Founder & Co-Director, McMaster Autism Research Team (MacART)

Bio: Mike is the Member of Parliament for Edmonton-Wetaskiwin, and was first elected in 2006. After his re-election in October, 2008, Mike was appointed Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry, a position to which he was re-appointed after the May 2011 election. On September 13, 2012 Mike was sworn into the Queen's Privy Council, after being asked by Prime Minister Stephen Harper to serve on a Cabinet Committee tasked with efforts to balance the federal budget. On October 19, 2015, he was re-elected to a fourth term, receiving the 5th highest vote total out of 1,800 candidates, from all parties, across the country. He currently serves as the Conservative Party Deputy Shadow Minister for International Development. Prior to entering federal politics, Mike worked for 10 years with the Edmonton Oilers Hockey Club where he served as National Accounts Manager, Director of Ticket Sales and Group Sales Manager. Mike holds a Bachelor of Commerce (with distinction) from the University of Alberta. Mike has two children, a son Jaden, 22, and daughter Jenae, 19. The Lakes have been active supporters of autism organizations, families and individuals across the country, and around the world, while sharing their story of life with Jaden, who has autism.

Affiliation: Member of Parliament for Edmonton-Wetaskiwin


Kibeom Lee

Kibeom Lee

Focus of Lecture: The HEXACO Model of Personality Structure: Its Origin and Development

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Industrial/Organizational

Abstract: Since the 1990s, many psychological investigations have adopted the Five-Factor Model (FFM) of Personality, which posits that personality variation can be summarized by five independent dimensions. Recently, however, widespread evidence has emerged in favor of an alternative, six-dimensional model of personality. In this presentation, I will review this new evidence involving the results from lexical studies of personality structure. The striking feature of those results has been the consistent emergence of a common set of six—not just five—personality factors (see Ashton et al., 2004; Lee & Ashton, 2008). This new six-dimensional framework, named the HEXACO Model of Personality, contains factors known as Honesty-Humility (H), Emotionality (E), eXtraversion (X), Agreeableness (A), Conscientiousness (C), and Openness to Experience (O). One of the most distinguishing characteristics of the model is the addition of Honesty-Humility (also known as the H factor), a factor whose defining content is not fully represented within the FFM. I will discuss some of the empirical findings highlighting the importance of the H factor in predicting socially important criteria and in explaining some psychological phenomena.

Bio: Kibeom Lee is Professor of Psychology at the University of Calgary. Originally from Seoul, South Korea, he was previously Assistant Professor at the University of Western Australia. Kibeom obtained his Ph.D. degree from the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario. He has published over 90 peer-reviewed articles in the major outlets of personality psychology as well as of industrial/organizational psychology. Kibeom and his colleague, Michael Ashton, are widely known in personality psychology for their development of the HEXACO model of personality structure. Based on their works, Kibeom and Mike Ashton wrote a book for general audiences titled “The H Factor of Personality: Why Some People Are Manipulative, Self-Entitled, Materialistic, and Exploitive—And Why It Matters for Everyone”.

Affiliation: University of Calgary


Frederick T.L. Leong

Frederick T.L. Leong

Focus of Lecture: Diversifying Psychotherapy: Challenges and Benefits

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract: This presentation will apply the Diversified Portfolio Model (DPM) of Adaptability (Chandra & Leong, 2016) to the field of Psychotherapy. Drawing from the financial portfolio diversification model of Markowitz, the DPM proposes that diversified investment in multiple life experiences, life roles, and relationships promotes positive adaptation to life’s challenges. Such diversification creates a larger repertoire of knowledge, skills, and relationships with which to adapt to the risks and uncertainties in life. While the DPM had been developed for individual adaptation, it is proposed that the same process also applies to higher levels of analysis such as the evolution and adaptation of a field of psychology. The challenges to diversification in psychotherapy include inertia, resistance to change, in-group bias. The benefits consist of a more robust, dynamic and relevant field. In discussing the challenges and benefits of diversifying the field of psychotherapy, this paper will focus on the five basic elements of psychotherapy, namely the client, therapist, relationship, process and outcome. For example, recent research has demonstrated that psychological science has been developed upon on a narrow and skewed sample of Western Educated Industrialized Democracies (WEIRD). Reliance on such WEIRD samples has severely restricted the generalizability and application of our research and models. This same pattern applies in our field of psychotherapy in terms of the study of very homogenous samples of clients or therapists. Hence, to counter this challenge, one specific recommendation is the internationalization of psychotherapy where research with diverse samples from around the world is conducted to identify the range and applicability of different models. Such an internalization effort has been undertaken by the Society for the Advancement of Psychotherapy (APA Division 29). The paper offers recommendations on how to overcome other challenges in order reap the benefits of diversification.

Bio: Frederick T.L. Leong is Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at Michigan State University in the Industrial/Organizational and Clinical Psychology programs. He also serves as the Director of the Consortium for Multicultural Psychology Research. He has authored or co-authored over 300 journal articles and book chapters and edited or co-edited 22 books. His latest books include the APA Handbook of Multicultural Psychology, ITC International Handbook of Testing and Assessment, and Occupational Health Disparities: Improving the Well-Being of Ethnic and Minority Workers. Dr. Leong is a Fellow of the APA, the APS, and the Asian American Psychological Association. He was the recipient of the 2007 APA Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology and the 2009 Stanley Sue Award for Distinguished Contributions to Diversity in Clinical Psychology from Division 12. He is the Founding Editor of the Asian American Journal of Psychology and is currently Associate Editor of the Archives of Scientific Psychology. His major clinical research interests center around culture and mental health and cross-cultural psychotherapy (especially with Asians and Asian Americans), whereas his I-O research is focused on cultural and personality factors related to career choice, career adaptability, and occupational stress.

Affiliation: Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry
Director, Consortium for Multicultural Psychology Research (CMPR)
Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA


Xingshan Li

Xingshan Li

Focus of Lecture: A Model of Eye Movement Control During Chinese Reading

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract:

Bio:

Affiliation: Professor, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences


Sonia Lippke

Sonia Lippke

Focus of Lecture: Health psychology in times of globalization and migration: state of the science and future directions

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine

Abstract: We need innovative approaches for promoting health and wellbeing in times of high migration trends, increasing globalization and digitalization as well as challenges due to cultural diversity. Accordingly this lecture will give an overview. For instance, beside the "healthy migration effect", migrants typically show poorer health than the native population. While people respond differently to disstress, many people need strategies to cope with challenges. This is impacted by multiple health behavior change (MHBC), e.g., nutrition and physical activity and their interrelations. Only a few comprehensive theories exist, however, one such theory is the Compensatory Carry-Over Action Model (CCAM). The few studies testing the CCAM or selected aspects of it including the psychological mechanisms responsible for MHBC in individuals with a migration background, help to improve health promotion in times of globalization and migration. Digital research methods (e.g., online questionnaires, computer assisted telephone interviews as specialized web applications) are state-of-the-science approaches because they allow administering international, cross-cultural studies and health interventions in different languages, regions and contexts. At the same time, risks related to digital devices should be taken into account such as privacy, data security and social media dependency. This lecture will also review health behavior change techniques relevant for working with divers target groups to meet their specific needs and to apply tailored interventions. Examples from doctor patient communication, training students in self-regulation and also professional skills, as well as diversity management in globally-operating companies will be reviewed with the perspective from health psychology. The aim of this overview is an improved understanding of MHBC, theory refinement and evidence-based health promotion interventions to help better to cope with migration related challenges. Future directions will be highlighted and discussed with the audience in an interactive format.

Bio: Researcher unique identifiers: orcid.org/0000-0002-8272-0399
ResearcherID B-7564-2014 researchgate.net/profile/Sonia_Lippke
• EDUCATION:
2004 PhD; Department of Psychology; Health Psychology Unit, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany; Supervisor: Prof. Dr. Ralf Schwarzer
2000 Dipl.-Psych. (Master equivalent); Department of Psychology; Health Psychology Unit, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany
• CURRENT POSITIONS:
Since 2016 Full Professor of Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine; Jacobs University Bremen/Germany
Since 2011 Faculty Member; Bremen International Graduate School of Social Sciences (BIGSSS), Bremen/Germany
• PREVIOUS POSITIONS:
2011-2016 Associate Professor of Health Psychology; Jacobs University Bremen/Germany
2010–2011 Associate Professor (UHD); Maastricht University/Netherlands
2004–2010 Assistant professor (C1); Freie Universität Berlin/Germany
2004–2005 Postdoctoral fellow and Postdoctoral research associate; Centre for Health Promotion Studies, University of Alberta/Canada
• CURRENT INSTITUTIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES (selected):
7/2014–today President elect of Div. 8: Health Psychology/Int. Association of Applied Psychology
10/2013–today Elected Faculty Speaker, Jacobs University/Germany
• COMMISSIONS OF TRUST (selected):
2015–today Associate Editor, Applied Psychology: Health and Wellbeing/Germany
2013–today Editorial Board, Research in Sports Medicine: An International Journal/Germany
2012–today Review Board, American Journal of Health Behavior/USA

Affiliation: Professor of Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine;
Department of Psychology & Methods/ Focus Area Diversity;
Jacobs Center on Lifelong Learning and Institutional Development (JCLL) & Bremen International Graduate School of Social Sciences (BIGSSS);
Jacobs University Bremen, Bremen, Germany


Kobus Maree

Kobus Maree

Focus of Lecture: Contextualizing and Decontextualizing Different Approaches to Career Counselling for Use in Diverse Social Contexts: Some Research Findings

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Div 16: Counselling

Abstract: Much has been written about the advantages and disadvantages of drawing on theory and practice developed in Europe and North America in particular to guide developing country theorists’, researchers’, and practitioners’ individual and collective responses to fundamental changes in the occupational world (driven by what has become known as Work 4.0 or Industry 4.0 (the 4th Industrial Revolution). While some argue in favour of such “importation” of theory and practice, others stress the need to research, promote, develop, and implement indigenous theory and practice in local contexts. Increasing calls to “decolonize” education and psychology in Africa have lent support to this view. Constructivist approaches, especially, have lately come under fire for allegedly being out of step with collectivist mindsets and contexts. Most researchers, theorists, and practitioners, however, appear to support a “middle of the road” approach, that is, using what is available while simultaneously developing indigenous theory and practice.
In this paper, I advocate use of the constructivist notions of constructing, deconstructing, reconstructing, and co-constructing to guide career counsellors’ individual and collective global responses to changes in the occupational world. More particularly, I make a case for contextualizing, decontextualizing, recontextualizng, and co-contextualizing career counselling theory and practice to accommodate different cultures and social contexts in an attempt to devise career counselling theory and interventions that can help alleviate poverty and promote sustainable decent work in resource-scarce contexts in particular.
In the second part of the presentation, I report on the findings of a number of recent research projects conducted in a severely disadvantaged (third world) area of South Africa, a country comprising developed and underdeveloped, first world and third world contexts adjacent to each other and intricately interwoven, yet vastly different in terms of available resources. Interesting results were obtained using an integrated, qualitative+quantitative approach (contextualized and decontextualized to heighten its value in the first world and third world contexts referred to above) to collect the personal data. The results showed that people’s often desperate poverty should not be considered the sole or “major” problem. Of grave concern also is that they do not have the opportunity to find meaning and purpose in their work-lives.

Bio: Prof. Kobus Maree (DEd (Career Counselling); PhD (Learning Facilitation in Mathematics); DPhil (Psychology)) is a full Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Pretoria. His main research interests are career construction (counselling), life design (counselling), emotional-social intelligence and social responsibility, and learning facilitation in mathematics. He links research results to appropriate career choices and to life designing.
Past editor of a number of scholarly journals, for instance, the South African Journal of Psychology, managing editor of Gifted Education International, regional editor for Southern Africa: Early Child Development and Care, and a member of several national and international bodies, including the Society for Vocational Psychology (SVP) (USA), the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP) (USA), the Psychology Association of South Africa (SA), and the Association of Science of South Africa (ASSAf). In 2009, he was awarded the Stals Prize of the South African Academy of Science and Arts for exceptional research and contributions to Psychology. In June 2014, he was awarded the Stals prize for exceptional research and contributions to Education, and he received the Psychological Society of South Africa’s (PsySSA) Award for Excellence in Science during the 20th South African Psychology Congress in September 2014. Prof. Maree was awarded Honorary Membership of the Golden Key International Honour Society for exceptional academic achievements, leadership skills and community involvement in October 2014. He was awarded the Chancellor’s Medal for Teaching and Learning from the University of Pretoria in 2010 and has been nominated successfully as an Exceptional Academic Achiever on four consecutive occasions (2003-2016). He has a B1 rating from the National Research Foundation (the highest rating in the history of the faculty).
Prof. Maree has authored or co­authored 100+ peer­reviewed articles and 55 books/ book chapters on career counselling, research and related topics since 2009. In the same period, he supervised 33 doctoral theses and Master’s dissertations and read keynote papers at 20+ international and at 20+ national conferences. He has also presented numerous invited workshops at conferences across the world on a) integrating qualitative and quantitative approaches in career counselling, and b) the art and science of writing scholarly articles. Over the past seven years, he has spent a lot of time abroad. For instance, he accepted invitations to spend time as a visiting professor at various universities where he presented workshops on e.g. contemporary developments in career counselling, article writing, and research methodology. Prof. Maree was awarded a fellowship of the IAAP at the ICAP Conference in Paris in July, 2014. In September 2017, he was awarded PsySSA’s Fellow Award (Lifetime Award in recognition of a person who has made exceptional contributions to Psychology in her/his life) at the PAPU Congress in Durban, South Africa.

Affiliation: University of Pretoria, South Africa


Herb Marsh

Herb Marsh

Focus of Lecture: Academic Self-concept: Cornerstone of a Revolution in the Positive Educational Psychology

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Educational, School & Instructional

Abstract: There is a positive psychology revolution sweeping educational psychology, one that emphasizes how healthy, normal and exceptional students can get the most from education. Positive self-beliefs are at the heart of this revolution. My self-concept research programme represents a substantive-quantitative synergy, applying and developing new quantitative approaches to better address substantive issues with important policy implications. Self-concept is a multidimensional hierarchical construct with highly differentiated components such as academic, social, physical and emotional self-concepts that cannot be understood from a unidimensional approach that considers only self-esteem. Particularly in educational psychology, self-concept enhancement is a major goal. Self-concept is also an important mediating factor that facilitates the attainment of other desirable outcomes. In education, for example, a positive academic self-concept is both a highly desirable goal and a means of facilitating subsequent academic accomplishments. However, the benefits of feeling positively about oneself in relation to choice, planning, persistence and subsequent accomplishments, transcend traditional disciplinary and cultural barriers. Perhaps more than any other areas within educational psychology, there is extensive international cross-cultural tests and support for the generalizability of the major theoretical models in the discipline. My purpose here is to provide an overview of my self-concept research in which I address diverse theoretical and methodological issues with practical implications for research, policy and practice such as:

  • Does a positive self-concept ‘cause’ better school performance or is it the other way around?
  • Why do self-concepts decline for:
    • gifted students who attend selective schools?
    • learning disabled students in regular classrooms?
  • Are multiple dimensions of self-concept more distinct than multiple intelligences?
  • Why do people think of themselves as ‘math’ persons or ‘verbal’ persons?
  • Does a positive physical self-concept lead to health-related physical activity?
  • Do self-concept models hold up cross-nationally and cross-culturally?
  • Positive Effects of Repeating a Year in School on Academic Self-concept and Achievment
  • How does country-average achievement influence academic self-concept
  • .

Bio: Professor Herb Marsh (BA Hons, Indiana Univ; MA, PhD, UCLA; DSc UWestSyd; HonDoc, Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munich) Professor of Psychology,Institute for Positive Psychology and Education at the Australian Catholic University, and Emeritus Professor at Oxford University. He is an “ISI highly cited researcher” (http://isihighlycited.com/) with 700+ publications, 88,000+citations and an H-index = 146 in Google Scholar (Google Citations), co-edits the International Advances in Self Research monograph series. European Commission study of citations based on the Google scholar H-Index, across all science, social science and humanity disciplines he was ranked first among all Australian researchers, and 228th in the world (http://www.webometrics.info/en/node/58/). He founded and has served as Director for 20 years of the SELF Research Centre that has 500+ members and satellite centres at leading Universities around the world. He coined the phrase substantive-methodological research synergy which underpins his research efforts. In addition to his methodological focus on structural equation models, factor analysis, and multilevel modelling, his major substantive interests include self-concept and motivational constructs; evaluations of teaching/educational effectiveness; developmental psychology; sports psychology; the peer review process; gender differences; peer support and anti-bullying interventions.

Affiliation: Institute For Positive Psychology & Education, Australian Catholic University; University of Oxford


Paul Martin

Paul Martin

Focus of Lecture: Migraine Trigger Management: Psychological Research Transforming Traditional Medical Practice

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract: For many decades, the standard medical advice to migraineurs has been that the best way to prevent migraine is to avoid the triggers of migraine attacks. This advice sounds logical, but the presenter has argued for a number of years that many triggers are difficult to avoid, and even if they can sometimes be avoided, this might lead to sensitisation to the triggers or a loss of tolerance for the triggers. Such a process would be analogous to the well-established relationship between exposure to stimuli that elicit anxiety and the degree of anxiety that the stimuli elicit, whereby short exposure leads to sensitisation (a factor in the acquisition/maintenance of fears), whereas prolonged exposure leads to desensitisation (the basis for the treatment of anxiety disorders). This position has been developed into the Trigger Avoidance Model of Headaches (TAMH), which postulates that one pathway to developing a chronic headache condition is via avoiding triggers leading to increased sensitivity to the triggers. A number of laboratory studies have been published that support the TAMH by demonstrating, for example, that short exposure to headache triggers results in sensitisation, whilst prolonged exposure leads to desensitisation. This work led to the development of Learning to Cope with Triggers (LCT), a new approach to trigger management that includes exposure to some triggers with the goal of desensitisation. A randomised controlled study showed that LCT was associated with three times as large a reduction in headaches as the traditional advice of trigger avoidance. This work is beginning to gain acceptance in the field as, for example, the European Clinical Practice Guidelines now recommend ‘coping’ with triggers rather than avoidance of triggers.

Bio: Paul R. Martin is Interim Director of the Research School of Psychology at the Australian National University in Canberra. He is a clinical and health psychologist who completed his training at the Universities of Bristol and Oxford. He is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society, an Honorary Fellow of the Australian Psychological Society (APS), and a Fellow of the International Association of Applied Psychology. He has held a number of professional leadership positions including National President of the Australian Behaviour Modification Association, and Director of Science and then President of the APS. He was President of the 27th International Congress of Applied Psychology held in Melbourne in 2010. His main research interest has been headache and migraine, with subsidiary interests in stress, depression (including postnatal depression), and social support. He has authored/edited eight books and 160 journal articles and chapters. His research program has received extensive funding including 12 Project Grants from NHMRC, and grants from Beyondblue and the Austrian Science Fund. In 2003 he received a Centenary Medal “For service to Australian society and medicine”, and in 2015 he received a Medal of the Order of Australia “For service to medicine in the field of psychology”.

Affiliation: Research School of Psychology, Australian National University


Fathali Moghaddam

Fathali Moghaddam

Focus of Lecture: Understanding and Solving Mutual Radicalization: When Groups and Nations Drive Each Other to Extremes

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Clinical, Community

Abstract: The process of Mutual Radicalization (MR) comes about when the actions of one group triggers more extreme responses in a second group, and this triggers further radicalization in the first group, so the two groups take increasingly extreme positions opposing one another, reacting against real or imagined threats, moving further and further apart. Mutual radicalization eventually leads to pathological hatred, so that ‘your pain, my gain’ becomes the guide for the actions of both groups. Using case-studies of major nations (e.g., the U.S.A and Iran; North and South Korea; China and Japan) and groups (e.g., The National Rifle Association and gun regulation groups; Trump and Sanders; ‘gridlockracy’ on the Hill), I present a dynamic model of mutual radicalization. The three major parts of this model apply to all groups and nations, but the steps within each part do not apply to all cases. In the final section, I provide a number of guidelines for preventing mutual radicalization, as well as resolving mutual radicalization after it has developed and extremism is normative in one or both groups.

Bio: Fathali M. Moghaddam is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Interdisciplinary Program in Cognitive Science at Georgetown University, Washington D.C., U.S.A. From 2008-2014 he was Director, Conflict Resolution Program, Department of Government, Georgetown University. In 2014 he became Editor-in-Chief, Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology (published by the American Psychological Association). Dr. Moghaddam was born in Iran, educated from an early age in England, and returned to Iran with the revolution in 1979. He was researching and teaching in Iran during the hostage taking crisis and the first three years of the Iran-Iraq War. After work for the United Nations, he researched and taught at McGill University, Canada, from 1984, before moving to Georgetown in 1990. He has conducted experimental and field research in numerous cultural contexts and published extensively on the psychology of conflict, terrorism, democracy, dictatorship, political plasticity, and mutual radicalization. His most recent books are ‘The Psychology of dictatorship’ (2013), ‘The Psychology of Democracy’ (2016), ‘Questioning Causality: Scientific Explorations of cause and Consequence Across Social Contexts’ (2016, with Rom Harre), and he served as Editor for ‘The Encyclopedia of Political Behavior’ (2017). His next books are ‘Mutual Radicalization’ (APA Press) and ‘The Psychology of Radical Social Change’ (with B. Wagoner and J. Valsiner, Cambridge University Press). More about his research and publications can be found on his website: fathalimoghaddam.com

Affiliation: Georgetown University, Washington D.C., U.S.A


SpeakerName

Jitendra Mohan

Focus of Lecture: Mindfulness, Yoga and Health

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract:Bridges across concepts and philosophies carry generations forward

Mindfulness is a symphony orchestrated among mind, body and cosmos to create excellence by creative collaboration among major viewpoints related to practicing a way of living, optimizing human happiness and harmony. Gautam Buddha , Patanjali and Sushruta & Charak in India and Hippocrates , Descartes ,Pasteur and others in the western world brought knowledge as well as practices up to the 20th Century. Somewhere down the line came Osler to make a new model named bio-socio-psychological.
In recent years there has been considerable research interest in mindfulness as a protective factor with regard to the difficult life events. In Buddhist teachings, mindfulness is utilized to develop self knowledge and wisdom that gradually lead to what is described as enlightenment or freedom from suffering.
Yoga is an ancient art (science) based on an extremely subtle science of body, mind and soul. A prolonged practice leading to a sense of peace and well being in relation to environment .It has emerged to be a singular most important new practice , recognized by the United Nations through World Yoga Day being celebrated on 21st June every year. Yoga has broken almost all the religious as well as cultural barriers to reach a new frontier. Yoga, as per Iyengar: is the path to holistic health. Ashtang Yoga includes eight dimensions and each one has very specific meaning and practice. The research evidence of its impact has been accumulating. It has been found to be useful in sports, concentration and healing. The aim of yoga is to calm the chaos of conflicting impulses.
Presently, the medical sciences and practices create newer frontiers in combination with some indigenous practices like yoga, meditation and mindfulness. This has enlarged the understanding about the very concept of health .Perhaps it could lead to a spiritual- bio-psychosocial model.

Bio: Professor Emeritus Jitendra Mohan is a member of Governing Council of International Association of Applied Psychology and President of Asia Pacific Association of Psychology. He has been a President of International Society of Mental Training for Excellence, Founder President of Sports Psychology Association of India, Indian Psychological Association and Indian Academy of Applied Psychology. He is a distinguished awardee of 11 Life Time Achievement Awards. Since 1969 he has been a popular presenter at International and National Level. He has been associated with 90 Doctoral thesis, 30 books, 350 Research papers, 20 Journals. He has living concern with application of Psychological Principles and research on sports, Health, Positive and International Issues of Equality, Gender, Excellence and Harmony.

Affiliation: President: Asia-Pacific Association of Psychology
Professor Emeritus of Psychology, Panjab University, India


Juan A. Nel

Juan A. Nel

Focus of Lecture: Applying Psychological Science to Intervene in Hate Victimisation of the Sexually and Gender Diverse: The (South) African Experience

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Section for Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

Abstract: Arguably a reflection of general attitudes, Africa is by far the continent with the most severe laws against sexual and gender non-conforming persons and communities. Recent developments suggest that, instead of abating, negative attitudes in some African countries may, in fact, be intensifying. A great deal of evidence points to this stigmatisation leading to deep-seated and widespread prejudice, discrimination and anti-homosexual harassment and violence, both state-sanctioned and extrajudicial.
In stark contrast to the rest of Africa, South Africa has a progressive constitutional and legal framework for the protection of the rights of minorities. Regardless of these legal protections, South Africa is observing on-going patterns of crimes and other incidents, collectively referred to as ‘hate incidents’ - specifically targeting people on the basis of, among others, their sexual orientation and gender identity. Such incidents (i.e., hate crimes, hate speech and intentional unfair discrimination) undermine social cohesion on a societal and community level and have been shown to have an especially traumatic impact on victims.
Considering the indisputable linkages between human rights, and health and well-being, Psychology - in serving humanity, has a greater role to play in moving (South) African societies to where they ought to or could be. In so-doing, Psychology not only has the power, but also the responsibility to actively challenge prevailing conditions of injustice and inequality. This includes counteracting systems of exclusion and violent othering, shaped by a colonial and apartheid past, on the basis of, among others, sexuality and gender, race, and socio-economic status.
This presentation will outline how the Psychological Society of South Africa (a.k.a. ‘PsySSA’) as a Learned Society, has applied the science and practice of Psychology in a variety of ways towards shaping public discourse and policy nationally and regionally to address hate crimes, in general, and the violent othering of those whose sexualities and/or genders challenge heteronormative and patriarchal power arrangements.

Bio: Juan is a registered clinical and research psychologist and employed as Research Professor of Psychology at the University of South Africa (Unisa). A National Research Foundation (NRF) rated researcher, his expertise in sexuality and gender - in particular, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) mental health and well-being, as well as in hate crimes and victim empowerment and support, more generally, is recognised. Related research, tuition, advocacy and community participation have contributed to improved theory, professional practice, policy changes and community mobilisation.
Passionate about equality and human rights, and the strengthening of healthcare service provision, Juan is a founding member of eight related government-led and civil society structures and organisations. These include the South African (SA) Victim Empowerment Programme (VEP), Hate Crimes Working Group (HCWG), OUT LGBT Well-Being (OUT), and the Department of Justice-led National Task Team that addresses gender- and sexual orientation-based violence targeted at LGBTI persons. In these contexts, he has often served as leader of related research projects.

Affiliation: Research Professor working from home,
Department of Psychology, College of Human Sciences, University of South Africa
Member of Council: Psychological Society of SA (PsySSA)


Marie Guerda Nicolas

Marie Guerda Nicolas

Focus of Lecture: Caribbean Psychologies: Then, Now, and the Future

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract: This presentation provides a contextual overview of psychological literatures of the Caribbean. Specifically, an outlined of existing scholarships that exists will be provided, followed by an overview of current developments and plans for the future. Through this presentation, the author seeks to demonstrates the mosaic of cultures, languages, etc. that comprise the Caribbean while highlighting the importance of the integration of such mosaic in the understanding of the psychologies of the region.
Objectives:

  1. Highlight the diverse cultures, languages, etc. that comprise the Caribbean
  2. Provide an overview of the various scholarships that available in the Caribbean
  3. Describes current strategies for further developments of scholarships focusing on the Caribbean
  4. Describes plans for enhancing scholarships focusing on the Caribbean with the integration of cultures and languages that are represented in the region.

Bio: Dr. Guerda Nicolas, Professor in the Educational and Psychological Studies department at University of Miami, School of Education and Human Development; Secretary General of the Caribbean Alliance of National Psychological Association; and Co-Founder of Ayiti Community Trust. She obtained her doctoral degree in clinical psychology from Boston University. She completed her predoctoral training at Columbia University Medical Center and her postdoctoral training the New York State Psychiatric Institute/Columbia University, Department of Child Psychiatry. As a multicultural (Haitian American) and multilingual psychologist (Spanish, French, and Haitian Creole), her research is reflective of her background and interests. Her current research focus on the integration of race and culture and well-being for ethnically diverse and immigrant communities. Some of the projects that she is currently working on includes: promoting academic excellence among ethnically diverse youth, identify development of Black youths, and empowering ethnically diverse parents to be effective parents. In addition, she conducts research on social support networks of Caribbean populations with a specific focus on Haitians. She has published several articles and book chapters and delivered numerous invited presentations at the national and international conferences in the areas of women issues, depression and intervention among Haitians, social support networks of ethnic minorities, and spirituality.

Affiliation: University of Miami


William Parham

William Parham

Focus of Lecture: A Way Forward: Mapping a Path on Which Sport Psychology Can Travel in the 21st Century

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Sport & Exercise Psychology Section

Abstract: The discipline of sport psychology has enjoyed important growth and maturation during the last several decades. Related, the progress across many domains has been welcomed and heralded. For example, since its inception in the United States, sport psychology has promoted advances in theoretical and conceptual underpinnings, research designs and scholarly rigor, applications across sport performance domains, suggested implications for domestic as well as international sport psychology professional audiences, and stabilizing disciplinary identities which serve as a hallmark foundation on which to build an even more promising future.

The introduction of cultural sport psychology in the late 1980’s through the 1990’s represented an important shift in sport psychology. The drive to form and solidify their professional identity fueled the early and formative years of the discipline. Cultural sport psychology, with its emphasis on acknowledging the complexities of larger environmental contexts (e.g., social, political, economic) and the impact said contexts have on how athletes think, feel and behave fueled an important developmental transition within sport psychology from infancy and childhood into adolescence. Expanding theory, research and practice of sport psychology, from this point forward, through lenses of cultural sport psychology will continue to be important. In addition, offered for consideration is the belief that implicit bias, stereotype threat, a broader critical pedagogy, and a focus on the millennial generation positions the already healthy juvenescence of sport psychology to emerge into the fuller maturity of adulthood ready to inherit the abundant promises and opportunities that come with this new stage of development.

The proposed presentation advances a position that the aforementioned areas represent critical catalytic stimuli that are needed for continued healthy disciplinary growth and maturation. Further, discovering a deepening consciousness and sensitivity about how socially constructed and systemically-supported political, economic and other environments inextricably influence the ways in which people, across cultures, ethnicities, identities and faiths navigate the inequities (e.g., economic, educational, occupational, etc.) to which they respond on a daily basis all but ensures long-term and sustaining healthy disciplinary growth and maturation.

In short, this presentation serves as an invitation for sport psychology professionals (e.g., psychologists, counselors, researchers and consultants) to enact two practices. First, to embrace self-reflection as a critically necessary component of their life-long development. Second, to develop and appreciate in concrete and measurable ways approaches to research, counseling practice and consultation that feel more inclusive and that more accurately captures the lived experiences and multi-dimensional identities (e.g., culture, race, ethnicity, gender, faith-based, sexual identity, etc.) of athletes they purport to serve.

Bio: WILLIAM D. PARHAM, PH.D., ABPP is a Professor in the Counseling Program in the School of Education, Chair of the Department of Educational Support Services and President of the LMU Faculty Senate. He has devoted his professional career to teaching, training, clinical, administrative, and organizational consultation venues. The interplay between sport psychology, multiculturalism/diversity and health psychology represents the three areas of professional emphases with which he has been most associated. He is a licensed psychologist, Board Certified in Counseling Psychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP) and Past-President of the Society of Counseling Psychology of the American Psychological Association where he also is recognized as a Fellow in Divisions 17 (Society of Counseling Psychology), 45 (Society for the Study of Culture, Ethnicity and Race) and 47 (Exercise and Sport Psychology).

In addition to his administrative duties Dr. Parham teaches five courses including: Trauma Counseling: Theories and Interventions; Multicultural Counseling; Foundations of Counseling; Lifespan Development and Social, Emotional and Behavioral Functioning and serves on department, School of Education and university committees.

For most of his professional career, Dr. Parham has focused on working with athletes across organizations (e.g., National Basketball Association; National Football League; Major League Baseball; United States Olympic Committee; United States Tennis Association; Major League Soccer, UCLA, UC Irvine) across levels (e.g., professional, elite, amateur, collegiate and youth) and across sports (e.g., basketball, football, gymnastics, softball, baseball, track and field, tennis, golf, swimming, volleyball, figure skating). He also has worked with performance artists in drama, theatre and music.

Dr. Parham’s emphasis on personal empowerment, discovering and cultivating innate talents and looking for hidden opportunities in every situation are trademark foci. The articles and book chapters he has authored during the course of his career and his participation on local, state and national boards, committees, task forces, and positions of governance adds to the visible ways in which he has tried to make a difference.

Affiliation: Chair | Department of Educational Support Services
Professor | Counseling Program
President | LMU Faculty Senate
School of Education | University Hall, Suite 1500
Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, California


Reinhard Pekrun

Reinhard Pekrun

Focus of Lecture: Achievement Emotions: Functions, Origins, and Implications for Practice

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Educational, School & Instructional

Abstract: Emotions are ubiquitous in achievement settings. Various emotions are experienced in these settings, such as enjoyment, hope, pride, anger, anxiety, shame, or boredom. Despite the relevance of these emotions for learning, performance, and well-being, they have not received much attention by researchers; test anxiety studies and attributional research are notable exceptions. During the past fifteen years, however, there has been growing recognition that achievement emotions are central to individual and collective productivity. In this presentation, I will use Pekrun’s (2006) control-value theory of achievement emotions as a conceptual framework to address the following issues. (1) Which emotions are experienced in achievement settings and how can they be measured? (2) Are achievement emotions functionally important for learning and performance? Test anxiety research has shown that anxiety can exert profound effects on cognitive performance; is this true for other achievement emotions as well? (3) How can we explain the development of these emotions; what are their individual and social origins? To provide answers, the emotional implications of cognitive appraisals, achievement goals, and social environments will be discussed. (4) Are achievement emotions and their functions universal, or do they differ between task domains, genders, and socio-cultural contexts? (5) How can achievement emotions be regulated and treated, and what are the implications for psychological and educational practice? In closing, open research problems will be addressed, including the prospects of neuroscientific research, strategies to integrate idiographic and nomothetic methodologies, and the need for intervention studies targeting achievement emotions.

Bio: Reinhard Pekrun holds the Chair for Personality and Educational Psychology at the University of Munich and is Professorial Fellow at the Institute for Positive Psychology and Education, Australian Catholic University, Sydney. His research areas include achievement emotion and motivation, personality development, and educational assessment. He pioneered research on emotions in education and originated the Control-Value Theory of Achievement Emotions. Pekrun is a highly cited researcher (see Web of Science, Essential Science Indicators) who has authored 24 books and more than 250 articles and chapters, including numerous publications in leading journals such as Psychological Science, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Journal of Educational Psychology, Child Development, Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, and Emotion. Pekrun is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, of the American Educational Research Association, and of the International Academy of Education. He is a member of the editorial boards of top journals such as Educational Psychologist and Journal of Educational Psychology. He also served as President of the Stress and Anxiety Research Society, Dean of the Faculty for Psychology and Education at the University of Regensburg, and Vice-President for Research at the University of Munich. In an advisory capacity, Pekrun is active in policy development and implementation in education. In 2015, he received the John G. Diefenbaker Award from the Canada Council for the Arts, which acknowledges outstanding research accomplishments across fields in the humanities and social sciences. He is also the recipient of the Sylvia Scribner Award 2017 (American Educational Research Association) and the EARLI Oeuvre Award 2017 (European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction).

Affiliation: Ludwig Maximilians Universitat Munchen
Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Munich, Munich, Germany
Professorial Fellow, Institute for Positive Psychology and Education Australian Catholic University Strathfield, NSW 2135, Australia


German Palafox

Germán Palafox

Focus of Lecture: Culture and Fundamentals for an Applied Science of Psychology

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract: Applied psychology focuses necessarily on the specifics of a particular problem. Given the complexity of most real-world situations, a thorough and complete description of them becomes an almost insurmountable task. Thus, a schematic or simplified but relevant representation of the problem is needed to find possible solutions. Both socio-cultural values and a subjective assessment by key actors of the situation (i.e., presence or relative importance of different elements of the problem), provide one of such simplified representations. However, a scientifically based applied psychology has to provide a representation of the problem space based on technical assessments of the basic psychological mechanisms and principles that may be at play in the situation, one that may be at odds with a social/subjective representation of the problem. In a necessary but difficult balance between “particulars” and “universals”, culture and psychological fundamentals build-up the problem space on which the applied psychologist has to work. It is argued that socio-cultural premises are a key factor in applied psychology insofar as they provide initial conditions or restrictions for known psychological “laws” and principles.

Bio: Dr. Germán Palafox Palafox is Professor of Psychology at Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) since 1997. He graduated with a BA in Psychology from UNAM (1986) and received his PhD in Psychology from Harvard University (1994). His doctoral thesis showed that a dysfunction of smooth eye movements in schizophrenics -a possible biological marker for this disease- was related to a basic deficit in the sensory processing of visual motion signals; a widely replicated finding. He was named Sackler Scholar in Psychobiology (1992-1993) by The Sackler Foundation and, the Department of Psychology and the School of Medicine at Harvard University. After finishing his PhD, his interests on education and, science and technology policy led him to complete a Masters in Public Administration at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University (1996), concentrating in education policy, leadership and organizational change, and the psychology of decision making.
Besides his academic work, he has served as an advisor and collaborator in several NGO and public sector institutions. From 2007 to 2011 he worked for the Ministry of Social Development as Head of the “Microregiones” Unit, a division of the federal mexican government responsible at the time for two nation-wide poverty alleviation programs: 3x1 for migrants, a co-investment fund to build basic social infrastructure in backward-poverty stricken regions, in which migrant organizations and governmental agencies at the federal, state and municipal level participated; and the “Primary Development Zones”, also a basic social infrastructure program to provide access to water, electricity, basic tele-communications, and roads to very poor and highly marginalized communities in the country. As part of his job as Head of Microregiones Unit, he oversaw and coordinated President Calderon’s strategy for the social and economic development of the 100 municipalities with the lowest human development index in the country, and the drives to substitute dirt floors with concrete floors, and open-fire cooking with the use of wood-efficient and smoke-free cooking stoves.
Thus, his academic and professional interests are ample, ranging from multimodal effects on the perception of visual space, visuomotor coordination and cognitive skills in sports, and cognitive abilities and subjective well-being, to the impact evaluation of behavioral interventions and public policies and programs, the applications of psychology to public policy making, and behavioral economics.
He is at present the Dean of the Facultad de Psicología at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.

Affiliation: President, Cancun Centennial Congress; Director, National Autonomous University of Mexico


Markus Raab

Markus Raab

Focus of Lecture: Sport Psychology: A New Perspective on Motor Heuristics and Embodied Choices

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Sport and Exercise Psychology

Abstract: Human performance requires choosing what to do and how to do it, but also harnessing experience to do it better and faster. Following a review of the state of the art in complex motor skills research in sports, this talk introduces the concepts of motor heuristic and embodied choices (Raab, 2017), meant to advance understanding of how motor and cognitive components of choices intertwine in order to achieve efficiency and accuracy in complex behavior. Results from a program of three studies (Raab et al., submitted for pub.) support those concepts by highlighting that one’s movements have directed and quantifiable effects on higher cognitive processes such as perceptual judgments, problem solving solution generation or perceptual discrimination. They challenge current conceptions by suggesting that action, perception and cognition are more linked than previously thought, and emphasize that choice production considers the actor’s own bodily system and motor experiences.

Bio: My main research areas is Performance Psychology that describes, explains and predicts human behavior in complex performance situations, mostly in the context of sport, exercise and psychological demanding environments. I am trained as a human movement scientist and cognitive psychologist and graduated in both fields thus I am interest in the relation between Mind and Motion, Thought and Action often referred to as Embodied Cognition. I coined terms such as Motor Heuristics and Embodied Choices to illustrate that humans in complex situations needs to decide and action upon their decisions with limited time, capacity and knowledge and thus may often need to rely on their expertise, experience and intuition.
Currently I am a Professor of Psychology, sharing head of the Institute in rotation every five years. I lead a Department of Performance Psychology at the German Sport University and being a research professor in part-time at the London South Bank University, London, UK. My main research interests are within sport, exercise and performance in general. Judgment, decision-making, motor learning and control, embodied cognition are areas of my profile studied from a dynamic and probabilistic cognitive psychology perspective using simple heuristics. I am vice-president of research for the European Sport Psychology Association, Associate of section editor of journals in sport and exercise and performance psychology.

Affiliation: German Sport University Cologne, Institute of Psychology
London South Bank University, UK


Henry L. Roediger III

Henry L. Roediger III

Focus of Lecture: Making It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Brain and Cognitive Science

Abstract: Cognitive psychologists have a long tradition of research about human learning and memory, yet their findings have rarely penetrated educational practice. This situation is starting to change. I will report on a program of research about the benefits of retrieval practice through quizzing as an aid to learning. Testing or quizzing is a practice usually considered only to measure what a student knows, but experimental research shows that retrieving information helps to stabilize the knowledge and make it easier to recall on future attempts. My presentation will provide evidence advancing from laboratory experiments to field experiments in classrooms showing how frequent quizzing can improve educational outcomes. If adopted, retrieval-enhanced learning may have far-reaching implications for education at all levels. Many experimental or quasi-experimental studies in university classrooms have shown meaningful benefits for students.

Bio: Henry L. Roediger, III is the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor and Dean of Academic Planning at Washington University in St. Louis. He graduated with a B.A in Psychology from Washington & Lee University (1969) and received his Ph.D. from Yale University (1973). Roediger's research has centered on human learning and memory, and he has published about 300 articles and chapters, mostly on various aspects of cognitive processes involved in remembering. His recent research has focused on illusions of memory (how we sometimes remember events differently from the way they actually occurred); effects of testing memory (how retrieving events from memory can change their representation, often making them more likely to be retrieved in the future); and the issue of confidence and reports from memory. He has also recently undertaken the empirical study of collective or historical memory, how people in a group remember their past. He has published three textbooks that have been through a combined total of 23 editions. He is co-author of Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning, published in 2014. In addition, Roediger has edited or co-edited edited ten other books.
Roediger served as editor of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition (1985-1989) and was founding editor of Psychonomic Bulletin & Review (1994-1999). He has served as President of the Association for Psychological Science (2003-2004), Chair of the Governing Board of the Psychonomic Society (1989-1990), President of the Midwestern Psychological Association (1992-1993), President of Division 3 (Experimental Psychology) of the American Psychological Association (1999-2000), and Chair of the Society of Experimental Psychologists (2003-2004). He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Education Research Association and the Canadian Psychological Association. He held a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1993-1994.
In 2008 Roediger received the Howard Crosby Warren Medal from the Society of Experimental Psychologists for his work on illusory memories. In 2008 he received the Arthur Holly Compton Faculty Achievement Award from Washington University. In 2012 the Association for Psychological Science honored him as a William James Fellow for lifetime achievements in psychology. In 2016 he received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society of Experimental Psychology and Cognitive Science and the Lifetime Mentoring Award from the Association for Psychological Science. In 2017, he was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences.

Affiliation: Washington University in St. Louis


Christine Roland-Levy

Christine Roland-Levy

Focus of Lecture: What can we do for risk-takers?

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract: The presentation will deal with risk psychology. Besides a general introduction around the concept of risk and risk-taking a series of studies will be presented. Based on the Social Representation Theory, risk in general will be introduced. The presentation will then develop around risk in different contexts, such as the financial context in relation to the economic crisis and or to gambling with financial incentives. Examples of studies will also present risk-taking in sports and at work will be presented.

Bio:

Affiliation: President-Elect, IAAP; Vice-President of the National Council of the Universities CNU 16
University of Reims, France


Jérôme Rossier

Jérôme Rossier

Focus of Lecture: Using contextual and personal resources to manager our environmental constraints and design our lives

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Counselling

Abstract:

Bio: Jérôme Rossier studied psychology at the University of Lausanne and at the Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium and is currently full professor of vocational and career counseling psychology at the Institute of Psychology of the University of Lausanne. He is the editor of the International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance and member of several editorial boards of scientific journals such as the Journal of Vocational Behavior or the Journal of Research in Personality. His teaching areas and research interests include counseling, personality, psychological assessment, and cross-cultural psychology. He published a great number of articles and book chapters and recently co-edited the Handbook of life design: From practice to theory and from theory to practice. He participated actively to many international research projects, such as the personality across culture research or the international career adaptability project.

Affiliation: University of Lausanne


Sandra Elizabeth Luna Sánchez

Sandra Elizabeth Luna Sánchez

Focus of Lecture: Promoting Psychology in the Americas: The role of the Interamerican Society of Psychology

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract: Founded in 1951, the Interamerican Society of Psychology (ISP) is one of theoldest psychological organizations in the Americas. The ISP contributes to the regional development of the discipline through international and regional congresses, publications, and the development of professional networks among different psychological specializations within three main regions: North America, Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, and South America. This presentation will discuss the role of the ISP in facilitating fruitful and beneficial collaborations among psychologists from the Americas and beyond. In this presentation, the presenter will share the rich history of the Society and will highlight the challenges and opportunities of collaboration within the ISP and across borders.

Bio: Dr. Sandra Luna received her doctorate from the National University of San Carlos de Guatemala. Her work experience is based on clinical practice, university teaching, school counseling and rural work. She poses a degree in Psychopedagogy and a Masters and Doctorate in Psychological Research with an emphasis in Gender and Masculinities. Dr. Luna also posses a Masters in Counseling and Mental Health. Her areas od training include neurodevelopment, psychological evaluation, diagnosis and play therapy with children. Her psycho-social work, included accompanying the communities after the disasters of Agatha and torrential rains, landslides especially with children and teachers in the area of the Pacaya Volcano as well as the West of Guatemala and the community of El Cambray. She has participated on several research projects in the area of axioms, cultural values, gender and psychometric evaluation. She also has experience in Forensic Psychology, in femicide courts for women and children victims of violence and have served as a consultantplease provide.

Affiliation: President, Interamerican Society of Psychology


Urte Scholz

Urte Scholz

Focus of Lecture: With a Little Help (and Control) From My Social Network: The Role of Social Exchange Processes for Health-Related Outcomes

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine

Abstract: Health-related behaviors usually happen in a social context. Most of the standard theories of health-behavior change, however, strongly focus on individual self-regulation and neglect the social regulation of behavior. Together with findings from research on social integration and better survival, and recent theories highlighting the importance to go beyond the individual and instead focus on dyadic / social co-regulation of behavior, this talk will emphasize the need for theories and research of health behavior’s social side. Social co-regulation of health behaviours needs to be studied within the social context where it occurs with the focus on different means of how people interact to regulate each other’s health behaviour, and by taking multiple outcomes, the health-related behaviour and related proximal health-outcomes, into account.

Potential mechanisms of social co-regulation of health behavior that will be highlighted in this talk are social support, social control, and companionship. These social exchange processes seem to play a relevant role for health-behavior change and other health-related outcomes. This talk will present research from randomized controlled trials, and intensive-longitudinal studies in different contexts on the role of social support, social control, companionship for health-behaviour change, affect, and other relationship- and behavioural outcomes. With this, I will highlight the benefits, but also the challenges and the complexity of social co-regulation of health-behavior change.

Bio: Urte Scholz is professor of applied social and health psychology at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. In her research she investigates the role of self-regulation and social exchange processes (e.g., social support, social control) for health behavior change in ecological momentary assessment or -intervention studies and randomized controlled trials while using objective behavioral measures and drawing on new technologies for data assessment. Urte received her PhD in 2005 at the Freie Universität Berlin, and held positions at the University of Zurich, the University of Berne, and the University of Konstanz. She was Associate Editor of Anxiety, Stress, & Coping and of British Journal of Health Psychology, and is member of several editorial boards of leading journals of Health Psychology. She is the current president of the Division of Health Psychology of IAAP and president-elect of the Swiss Society of Health Psychology. Urte's research is funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation. In 2005 she was awarded the early career award of the Stress and Anxiety Research Society, and in 2017 she was granted the honorary fellowhip of the European Health Psychology Society.

Affiliation: University of Zurich


Ralf Schwarzer

Ralf Schwarzer

Focus of Lecture: Health behaviour change: Constructs, mechanisms, interventions

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine

Abstract: Health-compromising behaviors such as physical inactivity and poor dietary habits are difficult to change. Most social-cognitive theories assume that an individual’s intention to change is the best direct predictor of actual change. But people often do not behave in accordance with their intentions. This discrepancy between intention and behavior is due to several reasons. For example, unforeseen barriers could emerge, or people might give in to temptations. Therefore, intention needs to be supplemented by other, more proximal factors that might compromise or facilitate the translation of intentions into action. Some of these postintentional factors have been identified, such as perceived self-efficacy, action control, and strategic planning. They help to bridge the intention-behavior gap. The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) suggests a distinction between (a) preintentional motivation processes that lead to a behavioral intention, and (b) postintentional volition processes that lead to the actual health behavior. In this presentation, the theory is explained, and a few example studies are reported that examine the role of volitional mediators in the initiation and adherence to health behaviors. Findings from intervention studies on dental hygiene, physical activity, dietary habits, sunscreen use, vaccination, dust mask wearing, and hand hygiene are presented. Studies were conducted in Iran, Germany, Thailand, Costa Rica, Poland, China, and India. The focus is on constructs and mechanisms of change such as sequential mediation and moderated mediation. Moreover, psychological issues in the context of digital interventions are addressed. The general aim is to examine the theoretical backdrop of health behavior change. More details about theory and projects http://my.psyc.de.

Bio: Ralf Schwarzer is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the Freie University of Berlin, Germany, and Professor of Psychology at the University of Social Sciences and Humanities in Wroclaw, Poland.He has received his Ph.D. in 1973 (Kiel), and was appointed Professor of Education in 1974, and Professor of Psychology in 1982 (FU Berlin). After sabbatical leaves at the University of California, Berkeley (1985), and Los Angeles (1990-1991), he was Visiting Professor at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (1994-1995), and at York University, Canada (1998) where he served as Adjunct Professor. He has published more than 500 papers, and has co-founded three journals: (a) Anxiety, Stress, and Coping: An International Journal, (b) Zeitschrift für Gesundheitspsychologie, and (c) Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being (currently Editor-in-Chief). He is Past-President of the Stress and Anxiety Research Society (STAR), Past-President of the European Health Psychology Society (EHPS), and Past-President of the Health Psychology Division of the International Association for Applied Psychology (IAAP). His research focus lies on health behaviours, stress, coping, social support, self-efficacy, psychological assessment, and digital interventions. In 2007, he received the German Psychology Award. He was one of the organizers of the International Congress of Psychology (ICP) in Berlin 2008. In 2010, he received the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions of the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP).
Website: http://my.psyc.de

Affiliation: Freie Universität Berlin, Germany


Stephen Sireci

Stephen Sireci

Focus of Lecture: Do Educational Tests Do More Good Than Harm? Criticisms, Benefits, and Evidence

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Psychological Assessment & Evaluation

Abstract: Educational tests are often lauded by policy makers and are valued for providing objective information. Purported benefits of testing include improving instruction; improving educational systems; providing important feedback to teachers, parents, and students; improving decisions regarding admissions and course placement, and protecting the public (e.g., licensure testing). However, there are well-known criticisms of educational tests that refute these claims and argue that educational tests may cause more harm than good. In this presentation, I will discuss the purported benefits and criticisms of educational tests, and discuss how we can evaluate the validity of these claims. I will also summarize evidence for and against the utility of educational tests. Conclusions will be drawn from this evidence, and suggestions for future research and practice in educational assessment will be provided.

Bio: Stephen G. Sireci, Ph.D. is Distinguished Professor and Director of the Center for Educational Assessment in the College of Education at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He earned his Ph.D. in psychometrics from Fordham University and his master and bachelor degrees in psychology from Loyola College in Maryland. Before UMASS, he was Senior Psychometrician at the GED Testing Service, Psychometrician for the Uniform CPA Exam and Research Supervisor of Testing for the Newark NJ Board of Education. He is known for his research in evaluating test fairness, particularly issues related to content validity, test bias, cross-lingual assessment, standard setting, and computerized-adaptive testing. He is the author of over 130 publications and conference papers, and is the co-architect of the Massachusetts Adult Proficiency Tests. He is a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association and a Fellow of Division 5 of the American Psychological Association. Formerly, he was President of the Northeastern Educational Research Association (NERA), Co-Editor of the International Journal of Testing, a Senior Scientist for the Gallup Organization and a member of the Board of Directors for the National Council on Measurement in Education. He has received several awards from UMass including the College of Education’s Outstanding Teacher Award, the Chancellor’s Medal, the Conti Faculty Fellowship, and a Public Engagement Fellowship. He also received the Thomas Donlon Award for Distinguished Mentoring and the Leo Doherty Award for Outstanding Service from NERA, and the Samuel J. Messick Memorial Lecture Award from Educational Testing Service and the International Language Testing Association in 2017. Professor Sireci reviews articles for over a dozen professional journals and he is on the editorial boards of Applied Measurement in Education, Educational Assessment, Educational and Psychological Measurement, and Psicothema.

Affiliation: University of Massachusetts Amherst


Yanjie Su

Yanjie Su

Focus of Lecture: Beyond Cognitive And Affective: Empathic Responding From Infant To Young Adult

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract: Empathy refers to the ability to perceive and understand the emotional states of others. Empathy is known to include affective and cognitive components, which theoretically correspond to physiological arousal and appraisal respectively, but there was little evidence about what corresponds to expression of emotion, or a supposed behavioral component. Our research investigated empathy in infants, preschoolers, adolescents and early adults. With simulated distress procedures, teacher-reported or self-reported scales, we identified a behavioral component and explored developmental changes in the three components of empathy. Results showed that behavioral empathy was evident in all ages. Behavioral empathy was reflected by the positive behavior an individual performed in response to others’ emotional experience. Preliminary exploration targeted at groups with atypical development, as well as genetic and neural basis of empathy also indicated that the behavioral components could be a socially normative output integrating cognitive and affective components. Cultural specificity should be noted.

Bio: Dr. Yanjie SU is a Professor at the School of Psychological and Cognitive Sciences, and Vice Dean of Yuanpei College, Peking University, China. Her research interests focus on evolution and development, particularly the emergence and development of theory of mind, and the relationship between social behavior, social cognition and executive control. She has studied behavior and comparative cognition in a variety of species of birds and primates, as well as children. She also serves as associate editor of "Psychological Science" (in Chinses), and General Secretary of Beijing Psychological Society.

Affiliation: Peking University, China


Kazuhisa Takemura

Kazuhisa Takemura

Focus of Lecture: Avoiding Bad Decisions: From the Perspective of Behavioral Economics

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Division 9: Economic Psychology

Abstract: Decision-making is often broadly defined as the conscious function of making a decision, but can also refer to the technical act of selecting an alternative from a group of alternatives, i.e., the action of choosing. Choosing a partner, deciding which social policy to adopt, and the consumer behavior of selecting a brand are all examples of decision-making. Bad decisions are defined as those that are not substantially better (i.e., that are not Pareto dominated) than the worst decision (selection of the worst option in all aspects). Bad decisions are made even in serious situations such as selecting a personal career or selecting an important policy in management and politics. In this talk, I will first introduce the conceptual and mathematical framework for multi-attribute decision-making and explain from a theoretical point of view why it is almost impossible to make the best decision. I will then give some examples of bad decisions that were determined as such by experimental studies in both individual and group settings. In experimental studies, people tended to make bad decisions even in fatal situations if they focused on the trivial aspects of a problem. Interestingly, bad decisions were not very related to educational background. In addition to providing a psychological model of bad decisions in multi-attribute situations, I offer some suggestions based on empirical research and computer simulation studies on how to avoid making bad decisions.

Bio: Kazuhisa Takemura is Professor of Social and Economic Psychology, and Director of the Institute for Decision Research, at Waseda University. He received a Ph.D. in System Science from the Tokyo Institute of Technology in 1994, and a Ph.D. in Medical Science from Kitasato University in 2013. He has been affiliated with Waseda University since 2002. He has extensive experience working abroad as a visiting researcher (James Cook University, La Trobe University, Australian National University, Tinbergen Institute, Gothenburg University, and Stockholm University). He was also a Fulbright Senior Researcher at the Department of Social and Decision Science, Carnegie Mellon University, from 1999 to 2000, and a Visiting Professor at the Department of Psychology, St. Petersburg State University in 2008 and Venice International University in 2015. His main research interest is human judgment and decision-making, in particular, mathematical modeling of preferential judgment and choice. He has authored and edited 13 books including Behavioral Decision Theory: Psychological and Mathematical Descriptions of Human Choice Behavior (Springer, 2014). He has also authored over 200 journal articles and book chapters. He received the Hayashi Award (Distinguished Scholar) from The Behaviormetric Society in 2002, the Excellent Paper Award from The Japan Society of Kansei Engineering in 2003, and Book Awards from The Japanese Society of Social Psychology in 2010 and from The Behaviormetric Society in 2016. He currently serves as a Board Member of the Association of Behavioral Economics and Finance, and

Affiliation: Professor of Psychology, Waseda University,
Director, Institute of Decision Research, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan


Robert J. Vallerand

Robert J. Vallerand

Focus of Lecture: The Role of Passion in People’s Life

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Educational, School & Instructional

Abstract: What is passion? How does it affect our lives? Over the past 15 years or so, an impressive amount of research has been conducted to address these questions. Much of this research has used the Dualistic Model of Passion (Vallerand et al., 2003; Vallerand, 2015). In this keynote, I present an overview of this theory and the research carried out on the concept of passion. In a nutshell, this model defines passion as a strong inclination for a self-defining activity that the person loves, values, and spends a considerable amount of energy and time on. Further, two types of passion are proposed: harmonious and obsessive. Harmonious passion is posited to provide access to adaptive self-processes and to allow the person to fully partake in the passionate activity with a flexibility and an openness to experience the world in a non-defensive (Hodgins & Knee, 2002), mindful manner (Brown & Ryan, 2003). Such adaptive processes are expected to be conducive to positive experiences and outcomes. On the other hand, Obsessive Passion is involved when people feel that they have to surrender to their desire to engage in the passionate activity that they love. Obsessive passion results from a controlled internalization of the activity, preventing access to adaptive self-processes. In this presentation, I review research that shows that passion, and especially harmonious passion, plays a key positive role as pertains to living a fulfilling life. In addition, I review recent research that takes the passion concept in unchartered areas with respect to a number of self-processes, including mindfulness, resilience, and optimal functioning. Implications for a psychology of passion are highlighted.

Bio: Professor Robert J. Vallerand is currently Full Professor of Psychology at the Université du Québec à Montréal and Director of the Research Laboratory on Social Behavior where he holds a Canada Research Chair on Motivational Processes. He obtained the doctorate from the Université de Montreal followed by postdoctoral studies in experimental social psychology at the University of Waterloo. He was also a Professor of Psychology at Guelph University and McGill University where he also held a Canada Research Chair. He is recognized as one of the leading theorist in motivational processes. He has written or edited 7 books and over 300 scientific articles and book chapters that have been cited more than 45,000 times (h-index of 100). He has mentored several graduate students including 20 who are currently university professors across Canada and Europe. Professor Vallerand has served as President of the Quebec Society for Research in Psychology, the Canadian Psychological Association, and the International Positive Psychology Association. He has also served on the editorial boards of the top journals in the field. He has received numerous research grants and awards, including being elected a Fellow from over a dozen learned societies such as the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, the International Association of Applied Psychology, the Royal Society of Canada, and many others. He has also received the Adrien Pinard Career Award from the Quebec Society for Research in Psychology, the Donald O. Hebb Award from the Canadian Psychological Association (the highest research awards for a psychologist in Quebec and Canada, respectively), the Christopher Gold Medal Award from the International Positive Psychology Association, and the Sport Science Award from the International Olympic Committee. His most recent book is The Psychology of Passion (2015 with Oxford University Press) for which he received the William James Book Award from the American Psychological Association Division 1 (2017).

Affiliation: Université du Quebec at Montreal


Fanny Verkampt

Fanny Verkampt

Focus of Lecture: Child-Victims' Rights at the Sharp End: Taking up the Challenges Raised by Human Trafficking Investigations

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Division 10: Psychology and Law

Abstract: According to the United Nations (2014), “international human rights law imposes important and additional responsibilities on States when it comes to identifying child victims of trafficking as well as to ensuring their immediate and longer-term safety and well-being” (p.7). If human trafficking (HT) is a crime affecting the citizens of all regions of the world, migrant foreign children and adolescents arriving in Europe are clearly at high risk of exploitation by human traffickers. To ensure that the basic rights of the young victims of trafficking are respected, the first duty of these countries is to identify these victims. Victims form the cornerstone of the fight against HT. Social workers and investigators are in the front lines of those coming into contact with HT victims and who can contribute to their identification. They are thus trained to conduct interviews with children in order to collect information about their current situation, their route and any criminal activities they have been victim of. However, the elicitation of vital information from the victims is challenging when traumatic experiences have complex and severe consequences on retrieval processes. This is one reason why HT is still one of the most difficult crimes to investigate. In this talk, I will review the recent research done on investigative interviews with young trafficked victims. Firstly, I will present the specificities of child and adolescent trafficked victims and the constraints these might have on the interview process. Secondly, the major difficulties observed during victims’ interviews will be reviewed and addressed within the perspective of contemporary memory research (Bookbinder, & Brainerd, 2016; Reyna, Corbin, Weldon, & Brainerd, 2016). Finally, I will discuss how young victims’ testimony might be improved.

Bio: Fanny Verkampt earned her Ph.D. in Social and Cognitive Psychology in 2009 and joined, in 2010, the University of Toulouse (France) as Lecturer. Its double scientific speciality allows her to work in a number of interdisciplinary research projects in the Forensic Psychology arena involving studies on social psychology such as: influence of social instructions on child testimonies; influence of interview protocols on witness’s cooperation; influence of media on citizens' attitude towards migrants; but also on cognitive psychology such as: influence of emotion on victims’ well-being during investigative interview or on the quality of their testimonies. She develops an expertise in investigative interviews issues with young witnesses/victims (children and adolescents). A particular focus of her research is in the development of interview methods to children and adolescent who require to engage with authority figure as witnesses to, and victims of, crime. Recently, her research focuses on immigration-related issues, such as the influence of political and media discourses about the refugee crisis (risk on economical and/or security stability) on French citizens’ prejudices toward migrants and refugees. She is a fellow of the American Psychology-Law Society and of the International Association of Applied Psychology. In 2014, she was elected vice-chair of the division "Psychology & Law" of the IAAP.

Affiliation: Université Toulouse - Jean Jaurès


Zhongming Wang

Zhongming Wang

Focus of Lecture: A Change Model of Entrepreneurial Competencies and Social Responsibility

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Sponsoring Division/Section:

Abstract: Entrepreneurial competency is increasingly seen as one of the crucial psychological characteristics for career development and success under change. Under the recent organizational change and transformation process, a new concept of entrepreneurial social responsibility (ESR) has been built and added into the list of entrepreneurial competencies. The entrepreneurial ESR is different from the conventional concept of corporate social responsibility CSR in the sense that ESR is intrinsic and change-based responsibility with three dimensions (responsible value, responsible participation, responsible dynamics) whereas CSR is extrinsic and social benefits-based responsibility. In this speech, a change model of entrepreneurial social responsibility is presented on the basis of a number of key issues such as career competencies, organizational change and cultural integration. It is also discussed with theoretical and practical implications for business development and education.

Bio: Professor Zhongming Wang has the Senior Professorship of Social Science at Zhejiang University, China. He received his Master degree in applied psychology and PhD degree in industrial psychology at Hangzhou University jointly with Gothenburg University. He is director of industry psychology division of Chinese Psychological Society, the IAAP fellow and member of IAAP Board of Directors. He is director of Global Entrepreneurship Research Centre and Centre for Human Resources & Strategic Development at Zhejiang University. He is also director of International Institute of Entrepreneurship Psychology and co-director of the Miller Institute of Entrepreneurship and Innovation. He is president of Silk-Road Entrepreneurship Education Network, president of Zhejiang Association of Behavioral Sciences and member of AMBA International Accreditation Advisory Board. His recent research focus upon entrepreneurship competence, leadership, organizational change, entrepreneurship social responsibility, career development, decision making and psychological methods.

Affiliation: Zhejiang University, People's Republic of China


Robert Wood

Robert Wood

Focus of Lecture: Stable, Dynamic and Situational Units of Personality: an Integrated Perspective

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Sponsoring Division/Section: Division 1: Work and Organizational Psychology

Abstract: In this talk, I will explore the meaning of structure and process in the study of behavior, emotions and cognitions and the implications for the study of personality. The accepted view of personality in organizational and other applied areas of psychology is that of traits, where structure means invariance in individual responses across situations and time. An alternative view is that of orderliness in the processes that underpin behavior, emotions and cognitions. Until recently, this view has been adopted in clinical case studies of individuals. More recently, quantitative approaches have been used to study the patterns of orderliness in individual variations in behavior, emotions and cognitions by linking them to the properties of situations. This new approach, which is being integrated with studies of between person differences, such as traits, raises some interesting questions, which will be addressed in this talk, Including: What do we mean by situations? How do we best model or represent the relationships between situations and responses? What value does this new approach add to the accepted view of personality? Can the new quantitative approaches be used in,clinical and historical studies?

Bio: Robert Wood is a research Professor in the Australian Graduate School of Management at UNSW. He studied at WAIT, University of Washington and Stanford. Bob has founded and been Director of the Centre for Ethical Leadership, the Accelerated Learning Laboratories, and the private company Cognicity, Bob conducts research into the dynamics of human adaptivity in leadership, ethics, diversity and inclusion. His research has won several awards including, most recently, the 2016 Jay Forester Award (with Shayne Gary) and the 2016 Georgia Babladelis Award (with Victor Sojo and Anna Genat). He is currently Research Director for the Recruit Smarter project of the Victorian Department of Premier and Cabinet and is a Fellow of APA, IAAP, ASSA and ANZAM.

Affiliation: University of Melbourne, Australia


Liqi Zhu

Liqi Zhu

Focus of Lecture: Children's Selective Trust

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Abstract: A large body of research on children's epistemic trust has shown that children trust informants selectively. However, most of the research has been conducted in western countries. Little is known about the development of this ability in other cultural contexts. In this talk, I will present a series of studies conducted among Chinese children to illustrate both the universal and cultural-specific development of children's selective trust. Questions that will be addressed include: Would Chinese children follow the majority or expert? Under what circumstances would they trust a stranger's testimony other than their mothers'? What kind of informants' characteristics would influence children's epistemic trust? How would their selective learning change with age? The findings may have implications for understanding children's social learning and its cultural transmission.

Bio: Dr. Liqi Zhu is a Professor of Psychology, at the Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China. Her research focuses on children's cognitive development and social behavior. She has published over 100 journal articles and book chapters in the field of developmental psychology, in English and Chinese. She was an invited address speaker at ICP2008, Berlin and ICP2016, Yokohama. She also served the chair of the jury of International Union of Psychological Science (IUPsyS) for Young Investigator Award 2016. Dr. Zhu is currently an Associate Editor of Child Development, the top-tier journal of her discipline and International Journal of Psychology. She is also the regional coordinator of International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development (ISSBD) in China.

Affiliation: Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences