Invited Congress Speakers

IAAP DIVISION / CPA SECTION INVITED SPEAKERS

IAAP Division 1: Work and Organizational Psychology

IAAP Division 2: Psychological Assessment and Evaluation

    IAAP Division 3: Psychology and Societal Development

    IAAP Division 4: Environmental Psychology

    IAAP Division 5: Educational, Instructional and School Psychology

    IAAP Division 6: Clinical and Community Psychology

      IAAP Division 7: Applied Gerontology

        IAAP Division 8: Health Psychology

        IAAP Division 9: Economic Psychology

          IAAP Division 10: Psychology and Law

            IAAP Division 11: Political Psychology

              IAAP Division 12: Sport Psychology

              IAAP Division 13: Traffic and Transportation Psychology

                IAAP Division 14: Applied Cognitive Psychology

                  IAAP Division 15: Psychology Students

                    IAAP Division 16: Counselling Psychology

                    IAAP Division 17: Professional Psychology

                    IAAP Division 18: History of Applied Psychology

                      CPA Section: Industrial / Organizational Psychology

                        CPA Section: Psychology in the Military

                          CPA Section: Educational and School Psychology

                            CPA Section: Social and Personality

                              CPA Section: Environmental Psychology

                                CPA Section: Educational and School Psychology

                                  CPA Section: Teaching of Psychology

                                    CPA Section: Clinical Psychology

                                      CPA Section: Community Psychology

                                        CPA Section: Clinical Neuropsychology

                                          CPA Section: Adult Development and Aging

                                            CPA Section: Psychologists and Retirement

                                              CPA Section: Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine

                                                CPA Section: Criminal Justice Psychology

                                                  CPA Section: Social and Personality

                                                    CPA Section: Extremism and Terrorism

                                                      CPA Section: Sport and Exercise Psychology

                                                        CPA Section: Brain & Cognitive Science

                                                          CPA Section: Students

                                                            CPA Section: Counseling

                                                              CPA Section: Psychologists in Hospitals and Health Centers

                                                                CPA Section: History and Philosophy Section

                                                                  CPA Section: Quantitative Electrophysiology

                                                                    CPA Section: Quantitative Methods

                                                                      CPA Section: Section on Women and Psychology (SWAP)

                                                                        CPA Section: Family Psychology

                                                                          CPA Section: Traumatic Stress

                                                                            CPA Section: Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

                                                                              CPA Section: Rural and Northern Psychology

                                                                                CPA Section: International and Cross-Cultural Psychology

                                                                                  CPA Section: Aboriginal Psychology

                                                                                  CPA Section: Developmental Psychology

                                                                                    IAAP Division 1: Work & Organizational Psychology


                                                                                    Gary Latham

                                                                                    Gary Latham

                                                                                    Focus of Lecture: New Robust Findings on the Primed Goal-Organizational Behavior Relationship

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                                                                                    IAAP Division 2: Psychological Assessment & Evaluation

                                                                                    IAAP Division 3: Psychology and Societal Development


                                                                                    Janak Pandey

                                                                                    Janak Pandey

                                                                                    Presidential Address: Evolving Dimensions of Psychology and Societal Development

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                                                                                    Sponsoring Division: Division 3: Psychology and Societal Development

                                                                                    Abstract: The objectives of IAAP Division 3: Psychology and Societal Development are to study and apply psychological knowledge for resolving problems related to societal development and change. The division promotes and provides platform for exchange of research ideas and findings for understanding and range of issues related to socio-economic inequality, deprivation, poverty, discrimination and injustice particularly to vulnerable sections of society and suggest policy change and action plan for societal development. On completion of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in 2015, the United Nations adopted the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in 2016, to be achieved by 2030. These developmental goals are related to issues like gender quality, eradication of poverty, meaningful work, subjective well-being, a safe work environment to improve quality of life. The IAAP has pronounced its policy to follow the best available scientific evidence to foster societal dialogue about science practice and innovation to promote the psychological findings for sustainable development internationally. Psychology is unique in possessing theories, concepts and methods which may competently deal with individuals and their groups and their influences on social, environment, organizations and institutions. Unlike other social sciences, psychology, competently deal with micro –social issues and impact of macro processes on individuals in the society, enhancing our understanding of both social systems and individuals. The paper specifically examines evolving dimensions of psychology and societal development in the Indian context.

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                                                                                    Purnima Singh

                                                                                    Purnima Singh

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: Shared Social Spaces :Crossing Boundaries and Barriers

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                                                                                    Nominating Division/Section: Division 3: Psychology and Societal Development

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                                                                                    Janak Pandey

                                                                                    Janak Pandey

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: Sustainable Societal Development

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                                                                                    Nominating Division/Section: Division 3: Psychology and Societal Development

                                                                                    Symposium Summary and Aims: The IAAP plays a significant role in promoting applications of psychology through liaison activities with UNO .The IAAP has been making efforts to convince the UN with positive roles psychology can play in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) identified by the UN for the period 2016 to 2030.One major concern of the SDGs is related to harmony in societies with diversities .Most of the societies in contemporary world are diverse and they face problems related to their peaceful co-existence with productivity. The proposed symposium is planned to present and discuss recent psychological science contributions related to social plurality and diversity leading to suggestions for policy measures to build sustainable harmonious societies with equal opportunities for economic prosperity, political participation and human development for all sections in national development.

                                                                                    Participants:

                                                                                    1. Prof. John Barry (Canada & Russia)
                                                                                    2. Prof. Steve Reicher (UK)
                                                                                    3. Prof. R.C .Tripathi (India)
                                                                                    4. Prof. Rolando Diaz-Loving (Mexico)
                                                                                    5. Prof. Janak Pandey, Discussant (India)

                                                                                    Presenter: Prof. John Barry (Canada & Russia)

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                                                                                    Presenter: Steve Reicher (UK)

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                                                                                    Presenter: R.C .Tripathi (India)

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                                                                                    Presenter: Rolando Diaz-Loving (Mexico)

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                                                                                    Discussant: Janak Pandey, (India)

                                                                                    IAAP Division 4: Environmental Psychology


                                                                                    Thomas Dietz & Linda Steg

                                                                                    Thomas Dietz & Linda Steg

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: Contributions of Paul Stern

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                                                                                    Nominating Division/Section: Division 4: Environmental Psychology

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                                                                                    Florian Kaiser

                                                                                    Florian Kaiser

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: Environmental Attitude

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                                                                                    Nominating Division/Section: Division 4: Environmental Psychology

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                                                                                    Tobias Brosch

                                                                                    Tobias Brosch

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: Determinants of Sustainable Consumer Decision Making

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                                                                                    Nominating Division/Section: Division 4: Environmental Psychology

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                                                                                    Sabine Pahl & Linda Steg

                                                                                    Sabine Pahl & Linda Steg

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: Emerging Topics and Approaches

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                                                                                    Nominating Division/Section: Division 4: Environmental Psychology

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                                                                                    IAAP Division 5: Educational, School & Instructional


                                                                                    Fred Guay

                                                                                    Fred Guay

                                                                                    President-Elect Keynote Address: Motivation at school: Between and within school subjects' specificity matter in the prediction of outcomes

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                                                                                    Sponsoring Division: Division 5: Educational, School & Instructional

                                                                                    Abstract: According to some motivational theories, such outcomes as achievement and performance are best predicted by motivational variables measured at the same level of generality. For example, a measure of motivation specific to math, and not a global measure of motivation at school, should be the best predictor of math achievement. Indeed, global measures do not consider the complexity and variation of self-perceptions, and this could impair the ability to understand and predict behavior. Therefore, scales measuring important areas of life would be more useful than global scales for understanding the consequences pertaining to area-specific self-related constructs. Such specificity principles (i.e., level of specificity-global vs. specific and area of specificity) imply that knowledge of the determinants of students’ achievement relies on an understanding of subject-bound dynamics. Various studies stemming from different motivational theories have applied these principles and have shown that a large portion of motivational variance is specific to school subjects. However, a survey of the field reveals a dearth in self-determination theory research testing the specificity principles and, consequently, limited knowledge of motivational dynamics. In this talk, I uncover fundamental processes in the way each type of motivation (intrinsic, identified, external, control) toward various school subjects predicts outcomes in these subjects and others. This analysis could lead to important discoveries regarding area (types of school subjects) and level specificity (global vs. specific) of motivation and broaden our understanding of student motivation and the associated outcomes.

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                                                                                    Affiliation: Département des fondements et pratiques en éducation, Pavillon des sciences de l'éducation
                                                                                    Université Laval, Québec, Québec, Canada


                                                                                    Andrew Martin

                                                                                    Andrew Martin

                                                                                    Presidential Address: Title TBC

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                                                                                    Sponsoring Division: Division 5: Educational, School & Instructional

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                                                                                    Andrew Martin

                                                                                    Lia Daniels

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: Teacher Motivation: A Promising Path to Supporting Teacher Wellness

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                                                                                    Sponsoring Division: Division 5: Educational, School & Instructional

                                                                                    Symposium summary and aims: Research on teacher motivation is rapidly growing. A shared interest in the effects of teacher motivation on both teachers’ wellbeing and their professional practice/development unite the papers in this invited symposium. Participants include preservice and practicing teachers from Canada and Australia. Each paper quantitatively examines the effect of teacher motivation on important outcomes including burnout, commitment, professional development, and teaching strategies. In 15mins each presenter will describe his/her theoretical approach to teacher motivation and results. Dr. Lia Daniels will serve as the discussant and will highlight ways motivation theory can support teacher wellness (10mins). There will be 15mins for questions.

                                                                                    List of authors (alphabetical, *denotes presenter)

                                                                                      Keiko C.P. Bostwick, School of Education, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia*
                                                                                      Rebecca J. Collie, School of Education, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
                                                                                      Lia M. Daniels, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada
                                                                                      Tracy L. Durksen, School of Education, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia*
                                                                                      Lauren D. Goegan, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada*
                                                                                      Nathan Hall, PhD, Faculty of Education, McGill University, Quebec, Canada*
                                                                                      Andrew J. Martin, School of Education, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
                                                                                      Amanda I. Radil, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada*
                                                                                      Lynn Sheridan, School of Education, University of Wollongong, Australia
                                                                                      Sharon Tindall-Ford, School of Education, University of Wollongong, Australia
                                                                                      Chair/Discussant: Lia Daniels, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada

                                                                                    Presenter: Keiko C. P. Bostwick, MAIS

                                                                                    Title: The Role of Gender in Teachers’ Perceived Autonomy Support, Relatedness with Students, Buoyancy, and Organizational Commitment

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                                                                                    Authors: Keiko C. P. Bostwick, MAIS, Rebecca J. Collie, PhD, & Andrew J. Martin, PhD

                                                                                    Institution: University of New South Wales, School of Education

                                                                                    Background: Although researchers have examined teachers’ experiences and outcomes at work, few have considered whether gender plays a role in these and how they are associated. Thus, we examined gender differences in associations among perceived autonomy support (PAS), relatedness with students, workplace buoyancy, and organizational commitment while controlling for covariates.

                                                                                    Methods:. We examined 276 Australian secondary school teachers. Teachers reported on substantive variables and background information (e.g., teaching experience). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to examine measurement properties and multi-group structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine associations between variables by gender.

                                                                                    Results: CFA results demonstrated measurement invariance across male and female teachers. SEM results showed predominate similarities across gender in associations between substantive variables. Specifically, PAS predicted greater relatedness with students and both predicted organizational commitment. However, for male teachers only, relatedness with students was also positively associated with workplace buoyancy.

                                                                                    Conclusions: Overall, male and female teacher models were broadly invariant with a few notable differences surrounding associations in relatedness with students. We propose that although male and female teachers are likely more similar than they are different, some gender-specific nuances may be present in teachers’ workplace experiences and outcomes.

                                                                                    Impact: For practice, there appears merit for non-gender specific approaches to promoting teachers’ workplace outcomes at a broad level. However, attention towards additional methods for promoting buoyancy among female teachers may also be warranted. For research, more consideration is needed to examine the role of gender in teachers’ experiences and outcomes.


                                                                                    Presenter: Nathan Hall, PhD

                                                                                    Title: Examining the role of motivational strategies in persistence and well-being in practicing teachers

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                                                                                    Author: Nathan Hall, PhD

                                                                                    Institution: McGill University, Montreal, Canada

                                                                                    Background/rationale: Given high rates of teacher attrition in North American schools, the role of motivational variables in predicting teacher persistence and psychological well-being has received increasing research attention. The present study examined how teachers’ self-regulatory use of motivational strategies predicted burnout, job satisfaction, and quitting intentions in practicing Canadian teachers.

                                                                                    Methods: Practicing teachers (N = 513) from Quebec and Ontario (Mage = 41.26 years; 85.2% female) completed an online questionnaire including measures of burnout (Maslach et al., 1996), job satisfaction (Moè et al., 2010), intentions to quit (Hackett et al., 2001), and motivational strategies following teaching-related setbacks (adapted from Heckhausen, 2002).

                                                                                    Results: Hierarchical regressions showed benefits for goal engagement (persistence, help-seeking) and self-protection (positive reappraisal), with disengagement (avoidance, downgrading) negatively impacting well-being. Whereas upward social comparisons (role models) were consistently beneficial (especially for new teachers), downward comparisons (worse-off others) were less effective, with horizontal comparisons (similar peers) showing consistently negative effects.

                                                                                    Conclusions: The present findings provide empirical evidence of the psychological benefits of motivational strategies as proposed in Heckhausen’s life-span theory of motivation for teachers, showing significant effects of varied goal engagement, disengagement, self-protection, and social comparisons strategies on critical persistence and well-being indicators including burnout, job satisfaction, and intentions to quit.

                                                                                    Action/Impact: Given the predictive utility of specific motivational strategies concerning well-being and employment outcomes for practicing teachers, it is recommended that teacher orientation, professional development, and intervention initiatives incorporate a substantive component highlighting adaptive (and potentially maladaptive) motivational strategies in response to teaching-related setbacks, particularly for new teachers.


                                                                                    Presenter: Amanda I. Radil, PhD

                                                                                    Title: The Motivation Design Principles Questionnaire (MDPQ): Evidence of Reliability and Validity

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                                                                                    Authors: Lia M. Daniels, PhD, , and Lauren, D. Goegan, M.Ed.

                                                                                    Institution: University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada

                                                                                    Background: Typically teachers’ motivational practices have been measured within a specific theoretical framework (Midgley et al., 2000). Recently, Linnenbrink-Garcia et al. (2016) proposed five design principles supporting student motivation that cut across theories. This theoretical advancement cannot be fully realized until there is a measurement tool to support cross-theory research.

                                                                                    Method: Our purpose was to create and collect evidence of reliability/validity for a quantitative self-report measure of motivation design principles. Items on the Motivation Design Principles Questionnaire (MDPQ) combine teachers’ verbatim open-ended statements and researchers’ perspectives in the areas of Competence, Autonomy, Task Design, Modeling Learning, and Relatedness.

                                                                                    Results: We conducted two quantitative correlational validation studies. In Study 1 (n=157), we used CFA to reduce the number of items. In Study 2 (n=149), we tested competing factor structures and determined that the five-factor structure was the best fit for the data, χ2=179.10, df=94, CFI=.91, RMSEA=.08, SRMR=.08.

                                                                                    Conclusion: Each design principle correlated positively with teaching efficacy, engagement, and enjoyment and negatively with anger. By extension, it seems that application of motivation design principles appears beneficial for teachers’ wellness.

                                                                                    Impact: The field of achievement motivation is deficient in instruments that take a cross-theoretical approach to motivation or that include teachers’ perspectives. Remedying these shortfalls, the MDPQ is the first measurement instrument that represents the design principles and involves teachers’ perspectives. Implications for research and professional development will be discussed.


                                                                                    Presenter: Tracy L. Durksen, PhD

                                                                                    Title: Preservice teachers’ adaptability at two Australian universities: A developmental approach to understanding and promoting adaptive motivation and engagement

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                                                                                    Authors: Tracy L. Durksen1, PhD, Lynn Sheridan2, PhD, and Sharon Tindall-Ford2, PhD.

                                                                                    Institutions: 1School of Education, UNSW Sydney, 2Australia and School of Education, University of Wollongong, Australia

                                                                                    Background/rationale: Despite a clear emphasis on pedagogical and academic growth in Australian initial teacher education (ITE) programs, gaps exist in how to best support non-academic development. Therefore, we sought a better understanding of how to identify and promote the development of non-academic capabilities such as adaptability at the preservice stage.

                                                                                    Methods: Students (N=151) beginning 2-year ITE programs completed one online questionnaire. We used scales with evidence of validity and reliability to measure motivation and engagement, adaptability, efficacy beliefs, and professional engagement with career development aspirations (PEDCA). Participants also responded to scenario-based items about adapting to typical yet challenging teaching situations.

                                                                                    Results: The criterion variable PECDA was regressed on six predictor variables: adaptive motivation, maladaptive motivation, adaptive engagement, maladaptive engagement, adaptability, and efficacy beliefs. Regression analysis revealed a significant relationship (F(6,143)=14.03, p<.000) with efficacy beliefs (β=.32), adaptive engagement (β=.18) and maladaptive engagement (β=-.20) as significant predictors.

                                                                                    Conclusions: Current motivation and engagement of students beginning an elementary or secondary ITE program was positively related to the value they placed on PECDA. Results extend previous findings associating higher adaptability, adaptive engagement, and confidence in capabilities to influence student learning as important indicators of aspirational professional development.

                                                                                    Action/Impact: Next steps include analyzing participants’ responses to scenario-based items for the purposes of developing a non-academic professional development tool for preservice teachers. Related scenario-based results will be highlighted and considered in relation to the current study findings when presenting practical applications for teacher educators seeking to foster prospective teachers’ adaptability.


                                                                                    Catherine F. Ratelle

                                                                                    Catherine F. Ratelle

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: The support of students’ psychological needs and their motivational outcomes: From elementary school to university

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                                                                                    Sponsoring Division: Division 5: Educational, School & Instructional

                                                                                    Presenters:

                                                                                    1. Frédéric Guay, Université Laval, Canada
                                                                                    2. Anne-Sophie Denault, Université Laval, Canada
                                                                                    3. Julien Chanal, Université de Genève, Switzerland
                                                                                    4. Tanya Chichekian, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada
                                                                                    5. David Litalien, Université Laval, Canada

                                                                                    Convenor: Catherine F. Ratelle

                                                                                    Symposium Summary and Aims: This session presents research on the satisfaction of students’ psychological needs and the factors promoting it, as well as the academic outcomes that follow psychological need satisfaction. Results from these studies demonstrate the importance of attending to students’ psychological needs within the school context, regardless of the level of schooling. Using different methodologies, researchers have shown the importance of need satisfaction for different, yet important, academic outcomes such as well-being, physical activity, and self-regulation. They also illustrate the importance for students’ academic functioning that significant individuals like teachers, peers, and parents support their psychological needs.

                                                                                    Presenter: Frédéric Guay, Pierre Valois, Erick Falardeau
                                                                                    Université Laval

                                                                                    Title: Motivating elementary school students toward writing: The CASIS professional development program

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                                                                                    Background/rationale: The goal of this presentation is to summarize results from three quasi-experimental longitudinal studies testing the effectiveness of CASIS, an inservice and preservice teachers’ professional development program intended to support students' motivation toward writing. This professional development program is based on self-determination theory.

                                                                                    Methods: The three studies involve preservice and inservice elementary school teachers and their students. In each study, we have a control and an experimental group as well as pretest and post-test assessments. Teachers were videotaped in their classroom giving a writing lesson at the beginning and end of the school year.

                                                                                    Results: Overall, results of these three studies supported the effectiveness of CASIS. Specifically, differences at the post-test were observed between control and experimental groups on most pedagogical practices. Moreover, the natural decline in children’s motivation toward writing was less important in the experimental group than in the control group.

                                                                                    Conclusions: These studies found that the CASIS professional development workshop could be an effective way to improve teachers’ pedagogical practices as well as to prevent students’ natural motivational decline toward writing.

                                                                                    Action/Impact: We encourage elementary school teachers to use the five pedagogical practices embedded in CASIS, namely collaboration, authentic activities, structure, involvement, and support for autonomy during a writing lesson in order to sustain students’ motivation toward writing.


                                                                                    Presenter: Anne-Sophie Denault, Frédéric Guay, Catherine F. Ratelle
                                                                                    Université Laval

                                                                                    Title: Extracurricular activities and perceptions of relatedness to others: Examining the sensitization hypothesis

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                                                                                    Background/rationale: The sensitization hypothesis (Moller et al., 2010) proposes that the more students experience relatedness to others, the more they will want to experience it in future interactions. In other words, basic need satisfaction leads individuals to value continued satisfaction. We examined this hypothesis in relation to extracurricular activities (EA).

                                                                                    Methods: A short longitudinal design with two time points at a one-year interval among a sample of 453 adolescents from disadvantaged neighborhoods (59% girls, Mage = 14.33) was used. High school students completed questionnaires on activity participation and on relatedness to peers in their school and in their EA.

                                                                                    Results: Perceived relatedness to other students at T1 predicted participation in EA at T2. Participation in EA at T2 did not predict an increase in relatedness at T2. To experience such an increase, students had to report higher scores on relatedness to other peers in the activity at T2. Conclusions: Experiencing relatedness in EA was necessary for students to report greater relatedness to other school students one year later. These results extend the literature on specialization and relatedness by showing that students who value relatedness to others will seek other school contexts that can satisfy this need, such as EA.

                                                                                    Action/Impact: EA can provide students the opportunities to interact with new peers and form new friendships that foster greater perceptions of relatedness to other peers at their school. EA could thus be used as an additional strategy to help students connect with their school, especially among students at risk for dropout.


                                                                                    Presenter: Julien Chanal
                                                                                    Université de Genève

                                                                                    Title: Effect of Autonomy-Supportive Climate in Physical Education Class on Youths’ Developmental Trajectories of Physical Activity

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                                                                                    Background/rationale: Lack of physical activity is partly responsible for the obesity pandemic observed around the world. Physical education (PE) permits all children to meet and develop PA habits and motivation. Our study aimed to test the influence of PE teachers on trajectories of children’s motivational resources and physical activity level.

                                                                                    Methods: A study involving thirteen teachers and more than 1000 students was conducted. A multi-wave-multi-cohort accelerated design was used. Measures of students’ motivational resources were assessed via questionnaires and PA via accelerometers. Teachers’ behaviors were assessed by children and teachers via questionnaires, but also objectively through videotapes of PE lessons.

                                                                                    Results: Results demonstrated that PA and motivational resources decline over school years. Moreover, our results emphasize the role of teacher autonomy-supportive style. Differences between self-reported, perceived, and observed teachers style on trajectories were also found. Teachers’ behaviors were responsible for part of the trajectories of students’ PA and motivational resources.

                                                                                    Conclusions: Youths’ habits are an important determinant of adult habits. Therefore, teachers could strengthen motivation for PA or reduce the decline over years by creating a more autonomy-supportive climate in their lessons.

                                                                                    Action/Impact: Professional development programs intended to support students’ motivation toward PA, based on self-determination theory, could reduce the effect of physical inactivity on obesity.


                                                                                    Presenter: Tanya Chichekian and Robert J. Vallerand
                                                                                    Université du Québec à Montréal

                                                                                    Title: On the Role of Passion in Science Education

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                                                                                    Background/rationale: The Dualistic Model of Passion (DMP) (Vallerand, 2015) posits that, contrary to obsessive passion, harmonious passion leads to more adaptive outcomes. We explored the role of teacher and parental autonomy support within this framework to explain relations with passion and academic as well as nonacademic outcomes related to science education.

                                                                                    Methods: Two cross-sectional studies were conducted at different time points (Study 1, N=761 and Study 2, N=257). College students completed questionnaires about passion, persistence, autonomy, motivation, and psychological wellbeing during class time. We used SEM to demonstrate predictive paths among autonomy support, both types of passion, and related outcomes.

                                                                                    Results: In both studies, parental and teacher autonomy support were positively associated with harmonious passion, whereas obsessive passion was predicted by teacher autonomy support only. Both types of passion related positively to outcomes within science education (Study 1), but only harmonious passion also led to psychological wellbeing (Study 2).

                                                                                    Conclusions: Our results supported the theoretical framework of DMP and extended this line of research by showing how HP also leads to psychological wellbeing, thereby allowing students to experience a fuller range of adaptive outcomes. The contribution of parental autonomy support played a significant role in fostering harmonious passion and wellbeing.

                                                                                    Action/Impact: Teacher and parental autonomy support is fundamental for college students to adopt a more harmonious passion toward science education. This impacts the way students achieve and maintain a balance between performing well in school while also experiencing outcomes related to wellbeing such as happiness and life satisfaction.


                                                                                    Presenter: David Litaliena, Nicolas Gilletb, Marylène Gagnéc, Catherine F. Ratellea, Alexandre J. S. Morind
                                                                                    aUniversité Laval, Canada
                                                                                    bUniversité Francois Rabelais, France
                                                                                    cUniversity of Western Australia, Australia
                                                                                    dConcordia University, Canada

                                                                                    Title: Self-determined academic motivation profiles among university students: Similarities across gender and age groups

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                                                                                    Background/rationale: According to self-determination theory (Ryan & Deci, 2017), students can simultaneously adopt various types of motivation. Although a person-centered approach is well-suited to explore their combination within individual, few studies using such approach and previous work have been criticized for relying on cluster analyses or on broad categories of motivation.

                                                                                    Methods: We conducted Latent Profile and Multigroup Profile Similarity Analyses to investigate whether undergraduate male and female students (N = 1072) from three age groups share similar motivation configurations (7 types; Vallerand et al., 1992), and whether the predictors and outcomes of these configurations are similar across gender and age groups.

                                                                                    Results: Results fully supported the similarity of the motivation profiles and their relations with the predictors and the outcome. Five distinct profiles were identified: Knowledge-Motivated, Control-Motivated, Fully Motivated, Unmotivated and Highly Amotivated-Sensation Seeking profiles. Students’ level of vitality varied across profiles, whereas both parents’ warmth and paternal involvement predicted profile membership.

                                                                                    Conclusions: Our results extended motivation research and supported a multiple motives approach and its generalizability across gender and age groups. Profiles presenting high levels on at least one facet of intrinsic motivation were associated with higher levels of vitality. The contribution of parents remains significant for undergraduate students.

                                                                                    Action/Impact: Teachers and parents should be particularly attentive to students displaying a profile mainly characterized by controlled motivation (Controlled) or by globally low levels of motivation (Unmotivated).

                                                                                    IAAP Division 6: Clinical and Community Psychology

                                                                                    IAAP Division 7: Applied Gerontology

                                                                                    IAAP Division 8: Health Psychology


                                                                                    Barbara Mullan

                                                                                    Barbara Mullan

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: The Role of habit strength and automaticity in adherence behaviours

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                                                                                    Nominating Division/Section: Division 8, Health Psychology

                                                                                    Symposium summary and aims:
                                                                                    Health psychological research has until recently focussed on rational processes of decision making and ignored the more emotional and automatic processes that impact our health decision making. This is particularly important in adherence behaviours where behaviours such as taking medication and engaging in physical activity are vital for personal as well as societal benefits. However most people are non adherent at least some of the time. Using a variety of theoretical approaches and spanning many chronic illness including diabetes and stroke, a variety of adherence behaviours will be explored. We also present some exciting new interventions and suggest ways of integrating the research presented into a comprehensive framework to inform new research.

                                                                                    We draw on research from five research groups, across three continents, and four countries to provide the most current, topical research in adherence. Using a variety of methodological approaches including cross-sectional and longitudinal predictive studies, single group and N-of-1 designs and a randomised controlled trial we provide a coherent narrative on new ways forward in both conceptualising and intervening in adherence research to better inform both research and clinical practice.

                                                                                    Using a novel theoretical approach Dr Mullan investigated what the most important predictors of medication adherence are. Based on dual process approaches she examined whether rational or emotional factors were most important in medication adherence regimes across a range of different complexities. The results suggest that automatic processes like habit are more important than controlled processes like motivation in predicting behaviour.

                                                                                    In a complementary study in a population with diabetes, Dr Burns presents results that explore the importance of considering the complex interactions between mental health, adherence behaviours and habit strength. This research has important implications for people with diabetes and their health professional multi-disciplinary teams. The results suggest that interventions should target strengthening habit to improve adherence which is the focus of the next two presentations.

                                                                                    Dr Phillips presents the results of such a habit based RCT exploring the differences in complexity of behaviour in forming and maintaining habit and behaviour. Her results demonstrated that there are individual differences in when and how habit based interventions work and interventions need to consider the temporality complexity of the behaviour and individual differences in when interventions might be successful.

                                                                                    Dr Fritz also presents on a habit based intervention developed to target physical activity and dietary adherence behaviours in low income African Americans. The results were positive with improvements in automaticity over time and greater gains in simple (eating) rather than complex (physical activity) behaviours over the intervention. This takes us closer to understanding how to facilitate habit development for adherence behaviours in high risk populations.

                                                                                    Building on the importance of inter personal differences, using both novel technology and novel methods, Mr Bierbauer takes an n of 1 approach to adherence to home recommendation in patients after stroke, to improve outcomes. People living after stroke need to engage in certain home based activities and using individual and dyadic therapies he demonstrated treatment effectiveness across groups.

                                                                                    Presenter: Barbara Mullan

                                                                                    Title: Can an extended model of health behaviour improve prediction of medication adherence?

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                                                                                    Authors: Caitlin Liddelow, Health Psychology and Behavioural Medicine Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University
                                                                                    Barbara Mullan, 1Health Psychology and Behavioural Medicine Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University

                                                                                    Background/Rationale: Only 50% of patients correctly adhere to their medication regime. Non-malleable factors contributing to non adherence have been previously identified and incorporated in interventions to improve medication adherence. However, non adherence rates are still high, indicating a need for research into other psychosocial variables that may influence medication adherence.

                                                                                    Methods: Using the Integrated Behavioural Model 163 participants who regularly take prescription medication completed a questionnaire measuring attitudes, perceived norms, personal agency, knowledge and skills, salience, intention, environmental constraints and habit in relation to their medication adherence. One week later, they completed a short follow-up measuring behaviour.

                                                                                    Results: Attitudes, subjective norms and personal agency accounted for 9.6% of variance in intentions, but personal agency was the only significant predictor. In predicting adherence, the factors accounted for 11.3% of the variance. Contrary to what was hypothesised, intention was not significant. Habit was the only significant predictor of behaviour.

                                                                                    Conclusions: The findings show that the role of social norms is important when considering intentions to take medication correctly. Further the role of automatic processes appear to be more important that rational processes when predicting medication adherence.

                                                                                    Action/Impact: Focussing on techniques that make behaviours more automatic, such as cues to action, is important in future interventions.


                                                                                    Presenter: Rachel J. Burns

                                                                                    Title: Does habit strength for taking medication moderate the association between symptoms of poor mental health and medication adherence among people with diabetes?

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                                                                                    Authors: Rachel J. Burns, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada

                                                                                    Sonya S. Deschênes, McGill University & Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Canada

                                                                                    Bärbel Knäuper, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

                                                                                    Norbert Schmitz, McGill University & Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Canada

                                                                                    Background/rationale: Elevated levels of symptoms of poor mental health are associated with poorer medication adherence. However, habit strength for taking medication is positively associated with adherence. This study sought to determine if the associations between symptoms of poor mental health and medication adherence were moderated by habit strength.

                                                                                    Methods: Cross-sectional data from 790 participants with type 2 diabetes who were participating in an on-going cohort study was used. All participants reported using oral diabetes medication. Mental health was assessed with symptom inventories for depressive symptoms and diabetes distress. Medication adherence and habit strength were assessed via self-report.

                                                                                    Results: Linear regression analysis that adjusted for covariates revealed a significant habit strength x depressive symptoms interaction, p=.02. If habit was weak or of average strength, depressive symptoms were inversely related to adherence. If habit was strong, there was no association. A similar interaction was observed for diabetes distress, p=.004.

                                                                                    Conclusions: This study suggests that habit strength may operate as a buffer in the associations between symptoms of poor mental health and oral medication adherence in people with type 2 diabetes.

                                                                                    Action/Impact: Elevated symptoms of poor mental health are relatively common in people with type 2 diabetes and good medication adherence is essential for diabetes management. Therefore, it is recommended that interventions promoting the development and maintenance of strong habits for taking medication are developed and evaluated.


                                                                                    Presenter:L. Alison Phillips

                                                                                    Title: Strategies for Helping Patients Form Treatment-Related Habits May Depend on the Behavior (e.g., Medication vs. Exercise) and the Individual (e.g., Diurnal Preference).

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                                                                                    Author: L. Alison Phillips, Department of Psychology, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA

                                                                                    Background/Rationale: Patients’ treatment-related habit strength predicts adherence, particularly in the long-term. Interventions should help patients develop treatment-related habits. Little is known about behavior-specific and individual-difference factors that may influence optimal habit-development. We hypothesize that timing of new habits should match individuals’ diurnal preference (morningness-eveningness) for complex but not simple behaviors.

                                                                                    Methods: We conducted a habit-development intervention (using implementation intentions) for two different health behaviors. 400 young women were randomized to 8 groups: behavior (calcium supplement; physical activity) X cue-timing group (no-cue control; cue-control; AM-cue; PM-cue). Diurnal preference is a continuous covariate. Multilevel modeling was used to test hypotheses.

                                                                                    Results: Hypotheses were partially supported. “Morning types” were better at developing calcium-supplement habits (and adhering to recommended doses) than were “evening -types” regardless of cue-timing. “Evening types” were better at developing physical activity habit when they were told to pick an evening cue for exercise, compared to a morning cue.

                                                                                    Conclusions: The influence of cue-timing for new health habit development may depend on the type of health behavior. Complex behaviors, such as exercise, might be best formed into habits if matched to patients’ diurnal preference. Medication/Supplement adherence might require extra intervention for “evening types”.

                                                                                    Action/Impact: While replication of these findings is needed, this research demonstrates the importance of investigating individual-differences and behavior-specific differences in health-habit development and provides useful information for intervention developers.


                                                                                    Presenter: Heather Fritz

                                                                                    Title: A Brief Intervention Targeting Dietary and Physical Activity Habit Development in At-Risk Populations: A Proof-of-Concept Study

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                                                                                    Authors: Heather Fritz, Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Wayne State University, United States
                                                                                    Wassim Tarraf, Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Wayne State University, United States

                                                                                    Background/Rationale: Adherence to recommended physically activity and dietary behaviors remain the most effective means of reducing cardiometabolic disease risk. Because habit strength predicts behavioral adherence, interventions should target habit development. Few such interventions exist and little is known about the feasibility and efficacy of such approaches.

                                                                                    Methods: Using a single-group design, we delivered an 8-week habit-based intervention targeting eight participant-selected physical activity and dietary habits among 24 low-income African American adults with metabolic syndrome. Anthropometry and self-reported behavioral automaticity (habit) measures were administered at baseline and week 20. Inferential statistics were used to test hypotheses.

                                                                                    Results: The intervention was feasible and resulted in gains in behavioral automaticity for 98.9% of habits. Adherence was positively associated with gains in behavioral automaticity for both behaviors, though adherence and gains in behavioral automaticity were higher for dietary than physical activity habits. Participants reported difficulties pursuing multiple habits simultaneously.

                                                                                    Conclusions: The habit-based intervention pilot resulted in positive gains in behavioral automaticity across a range of dietary and physical activity behaviors. Habit-based interventions might be best affected by breaking complex behaviors down into component parts. Developing multiple habits simultaneously may increase the time it takes to develop a habit.

                                                                                    Action/Impact: While more research is needed to determine how best to facilitate habit development among high-risk populations in real-world circumstances, this research is a first step in developing understanding of how this could be achieved.


                                                                                    Presenter: Walter Bierbauer

                                                                                    Title: Robot-assisted therapy in chronic stroke patients: Adherence to at-home treatment recommendation

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                                                                                    Authors: Walter Bierbauer, URPP Dynamics of Healthy Aging & Applied Social and Health Psychology, University of Zurich, Switzerland
                                                                                    Kilian Baur, Sensory-Motor Systems Lab, ETH Zurich and Spinal Cord Injury Center, University Hospital Balgrist, Switzerland
                                                                                    Jaime E. Duarte, Sensory-Motor Systems Lab, ETH Zurich and Spinal Cord Injury Center, University Hospital Balgrist, Switzerland
                                                                                    Urte Scholz, Applied Social and Health Psychology & URPP Dynamics of Healthy Aging, University of Zurich, Switzerland

                                                                                    Background: Stroke patients often face reduced mobility and loss of upper extremity function. Robot-assisted therapy can help patients significantly improve functioning in their paretic arm. It remains unclear whether these improvements also translate into everyday life. This study investigates how stroke patients adhere to at-home treatment recommendations.

                                                                                    Methods: In cumulative N-of-1 trials adopting an A-B-A-B design patients got both solo robot-assisted therapy (A) and dyadic robot-assisted therapy (B) together with their spouse. At-home arm activity was measured by wrist-worn accelerometry and related motivational, volitional and social variables were collected daily using self-report across five weeks.

                                                                                    Results: In weeks with robot-assisted therapy, patients increased their participation in activities of daily living. Additionally, dyadic therapy was associated with increased paretic arm involvement in everyday life, thereby adhering to treatment recommendations.

                                                                                    Conclusion: Fostering daily at-home exercises of a paretic arm is an important goal in stroke rehabilitation. By examining the effects of different robot-assisted therapies on exercising behaviour, this study contributes to the optimization of the stroke rehabilitation process.

                                                                                    Impact: N-of-1 trials can be used to evaluate treatment effectiveness in a single individual, thereby helping to close the gap between evidence and practice. The aggregation of these trial findings will inform treatment decisions for other patients unaffiliated with the trial.

                                                                                    IAAP Division 9: Economic Psychology

                                                                                    IAAP Division 10: Psychology and Law

                                                                                    IAAP Division 11: Political Psychology

                                                                                    IAAP Division 12: Sport Psychology


                                                                                    Lawrence R. Brawley

                                                                                    Lawrence R. Brawley

                                                                                    Focus of Lecture: Encouraging Self-Management of Exercise Using a Group-mediated Cognitive Behavioural Intervention: Social-Cognitive, Functional and Adherence Effects .

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                                                                                    Sponsoring Division: Division 12, Sport Psychology

                                                                                    Abstract: There are multiple, well known physical and mental health benefits accrued by older adults who are regularly active ([WHO], 2010). On the other hand, it is also well recognized that the older adult segment of the population is perhaps the least active of all age groups. Both asymptomatic and symptomatic older adults benefit from exercise training and exercise therapy provided through interventions and physical activity through community programs. Many of these programs are economically delivered by group format in community leisure services and through regional disease prevention/health promotion programs. Ironically, the benefits attained are typically short lived when older adults attempt to self-manage activity after they leave such programs. From a translational perspective, could such groups be utilized as (a) one means of offering older adults social support,(b) a motivational influence for intervening and (c) a platform in which to learn self-regulation skills to increase and maintain changes in their exercise?

                                                                                    To answer these questions, this presentation is divided into four discrete sections. First, we discuss background why groups can be powerful behavior change agents as well as the basic structure of our group-motivated intervention model. Second, we present a generic description of the intervention structure and how we conduct this group-mediated cognitive behavioural intervention (GMCB). Third, we present a meta-analytic summary of results of several older adult GMCB physical activity interventions across outcomes concerning physical activity adherence; functional and physiological factors; and social cognitive factors. Fourth, we close the presentation by commenting on the translational perspective for this type of intervention relative to feasibility, interventionist training, and potential sustainability toward the goal of promoting older adult health and preventing disease.

                                                                                    Bio: Dr. Brawley is a Professor and Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in the College of Kinesiology and affiliate member of the School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan. He is in the second of his 7 year, Canada Research Chair (CRC) awards. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences and several sport and exercise psychology scientific organizations. As a CRC, Dr. Brawley’s research examines why some older adults successfully adopt physical activity for (a) healthy lifestyle change, (b) chronic disease self-management, while others struggle. Understanding the psychology of this change is essential to help people sustain the activity needed to promote health and prevent diseases. To this end, he and his colleagues have developed novel group-motivated, cognitive-behavior change interventions that successfully encourage individuals to maintain changes in their physical activity. These interventions have been conducted, for example, among sedentary older adults; cardiac rehabilitation initiates; overweight individuals and those with knee osteoarthritis; spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis. Dr. Brawley’s publications span the fields of psychology, kinesiology, behavioral medicine, public health, gerontology and rehabilitation. With colleagues, he has recently contributed a chapter entitled Self Management of Health Behavior in Geriatric Medicine in Hazzard’s 2016 text on Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology. He is currently funded by the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada and the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation.

                                                                                    Affiliation: Canada Research Chair, Tier 1 in Physical Activity for Health Promotion & Disease Prevention, College of Kinesiology, School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan


                                                                                    Larry Brawley

                                                                                    Lawrence R. Brawley

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: Perspectives on Physical Activity Promotion in Diverse Groups and in Different Settings

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                                                                                    Nominating Division/Section: Division 12, Sport Psychology

                                                                                    Abstract:

                                                                                    Bio: Dr. Brawley is a Professor and Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in the College of Kinesiology and affiliate member of the School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan. He is in the second of his 7 year, Canada Research Chair (CRC) awards. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences and several sport and exercise psychology scientific organizations. As a CRC, Dr. Brawley’s research examines why some older adults successfully adopt physical activity for (a) healthy lifestyle change, (b) chronic disease self-management, while others struggle. Understanding the psychology of this change is essential to help people sustain the activity needed to promote health and prevent diseases. To this end, he and his colleagues have developed novel group-motivated, cognitive-behavior change interventions that successfully encourage individuals to maintain changes in their physical activity. These interventions have been conducted, for example, among sedentary older adults; cardiac rehabilitation initiates; overweight individuals and those with knee osteoarthritis; spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis. Dr. Brawley’s publications span the fields of psychology, kinesiology, behavioral medicine, public health, gerontology and rehabilitation. With colleagues, he has recently contributed a chapter entitled Self Management of Health Behavior in Geriatric Medicine in Hazzard’s 2016 text on Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology. He is currently funded by the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada and the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation.

                                                                                    Affiliation: University of Saskatchewan, Canada

                                                                                    Presenter: Amy Latimer-Cheung, Queen’s University, Canada

                                                                                    Title: Increasing physical activity participation among adults with a mobility impairment

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                                                                                    Abstract: Mobility impairments are those that affect a person’s ability to move including amputation, cerebral palsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and spinal cord injury. Research to date suggests that there are physical and psychological benefits associated with the adoption and maintenance of an active lifestyle for adults living with a mobility impairment. Pulling from theories of physical activity promotion, this presentation will summarise: 1) recent investigations developing and testing persuasive messages and theory-based interventions encouraging participation, 2) the optimisation of delivery of community-based programming, and 3) the leveraging of physical activity status to mitigate stereotypes of disability. Reasons for successes and lessons learned in translating research findings to the key stakeholders in the disability community will also be discussed.


                                                                                    Presenter: Kevin S. Spink, University of Saskatchewan, Canada

                                                                                    Title: All for one, one for all: Social norms as levers of influence in getting people active

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                                                                                    Abstract: Staying healthy is goal that few would dispute. While there are many ways to say healthy, one that has been gaining traction through a burgeoning compilation of research is being physically active. Achieving a certain level of physical activity has been associated with a host of health benefits that range from reducing one’s risk of cardiovascular disease to improving one’s mental functioning. Despite these evidence-based claims for the improvement in health through physical activity, most adults do not achieve the required levels of activity to accrue the benefits. Although there are many factors that we could consider as we ponder how to get people more active, one that comes to mind is the social environment. After all, we are social beings, and as such, we rely on others for information about how to navigate the environment we find ourselves in any given time. We also know that we often decide what to do by observing/perceiving what other people do and think. A perusal of the extant literature reveals that there is a large body of evidence documenting the relationships between what others do (social norms) and human behaviour in many settings. However, examination of social norms in the physical activity setting is just emerging. Using an established conceptual framework, this presentation will provide recent findings emanating from our lab that illustrate how perceptions of others’ activity behaviour are related to, as well as influence, individual physical activity in the school, work, and sport setting. Applied implications emanating from this research will be provided.


                                                                                    Presenter: Larry Brawley, University of Saskatchewan, Canada

                                                                                    Title: The dilemma of relying too much on exercise providers

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                                                                                    Abstract: This presentation will raise the possibility that helpful exercise providers and health care professionals may inadvertently be contributing to the decline in exercise adherence after exercise programs finish. For individuals relying heavily on providers for support, guidance and instruction, a dilemma arises. Dependence on the exercise provider means participants are less likely to have had opportunity to develop the skills or have mastery experiences required for their sole management of exercise and for continuing adherence. Consequently, adherence to independent exercise post program tends to decline. To illustrate, research examples from asymptomatic exercisers as well as those with cardiovascular disease are presented. Those individuals relying more on the provider tend to see themselves (a) being less persistent with future exercise, (b) choose fewer possibilities to execute self-managed exercise (c) engage in self-managed exercise less than those who relied less on providers. To conclude, evidence-based interventions are highlighted where providers collaborate with participants before structured exercise ends to provide mastery experience with self-management.


                                                                                    Presenter: Glyn C. Roberts, Marit Sorensen, Nicolas Lemyre, on behalf of the EuroFIT Consortium. Norwegian University of Sport Science, Oslo, Norway.

                                                                                    Title: Motivation strategies for sustained behaviour change in active lifestyle interventions: The EuroFIT project

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                                                                                    Abstract: We can never have equality of achievement, but we can have equality of motivation: That quote by Nicholls (1979) enshrines the conceptual basis of enhancing motivation for lifestyle change in the EuroFIT project. EuroFIT uses contemporary motivation theory in a pragmatic randomised controlled trial to adopt and sustain health related behaviors such as increased physical activity, reduced sedentary behavior, and healthy diets in middle-aged men. Men participated in a 12-week behavior change program delivered at their local professional football club. We utilized technology advances to provide real-time, self-relevant feedback on sedentary time and physical activity (SitFit), as well as connection to other participants (MatchFit), to sustain engagement and self-regulation. Club coaches in 15 top professional soccer clubs in four EuroFIT countries (Norway, Portugal, Netherlands, and England) delivered the EuroFIT intervention. We describe the components of EuroFIT that are informed by contemporary motivation theory. We will present the findings of the intervention model as partially mediated by constructs such as need satisfaction, autonomous motivation, and self-referenced mastery competence resulting in sustained healthy lifestyles and improved health and well-being.


                                                                                    Discussant: Joan L Duda, University of Birmingham, UK


                                                                                    Joan L. Duda

                                                                                    Joan L. Duda

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: Contemporary Topics in Sport Psychology: Connecting Science to Solutions

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                                                                                    Sponsoring Division: Division 12, Sport Psychology

                                                                                    Abstract:

                                                                                    Bio:

                                                                                    Affiliation: University of Birmingham, UK

                                                                                    Presenter: Montse C. Ruiz

                                                                                    Title: Assessment of psychobiosocial states related to sports performance and implications for applied practice

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                                                                                    Authors: Montse C. Ruiz1, Claudio Robazza2, Asko Tolvanen3 & Juri Hanin4
                                                                                    1 University of Jyväskylä, Finland; 2 University of Chieti-Pescara, Italy; 3 University of Jyväskylä, Finland; 4 KIHU-Research Institute for Olympic Sports, Finland

                                                                                    Abstract: Most previous emotion research has focused on the study of the impact of selected discrete emotions on sports performance. Athletes, however, experience a wide range of emotions and other feeling states, which can aid or disrupt performance. The individual zones of optimal functioning (IZOF) model (Hanin, 2007) has guided the study of athletes’ performance-related states. Grounded in the IZOF model, a psychobiosocial state is defined as a situational and multimodal manifestation of total human functioning with emotion at its core. Substantial empirical evidence has provided support for the utility of a comprehensive assessment of athletes’ emotional experiences (Ruiz, Raglin, & Hanin, 2017). This presentation will outline an idiographic approach, which can be used for an accurate assessment for intra-individual and inter-individual analysis of athletes’ functional and dysfunctional states. Implications for applied practice will be discussed; in particular regarding the development of effective interventions aimed at helping athletes regulate their emotional states to better cope with competitive pressures and achieve a consistently high level of performance in training and competition.


                                                                                    Presenter: Claudio Robazza

                                                                                    Title: Emotions and self-regulation in sport

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                                                                                    Authors: Claudio Robazza1, Montse C. Ruiz2,
                                                                                    1 University of Chieti-Pescara, Italy; 2 University of Jyväskylä, Finland

                                                                                    Abstract: Emotions are recognized to exert short- and long-term, functional or dysfunctional effects on performance due to their impact on individual effort, attention, decision making, memory, behavior, and interpersonal interactions. These effects depend on emotion content, intensity, frequency, time of occurrence, and cognitive appraisal, as well as self-regulation skills. Athletes strive to self-regulate in practice and competition to reach and maintain an optimal pattern of emotions also in face of unfavorable circumstances. Among the several theoretical perspectives on emotional self-regulation, the multi-action plan (MAP) is a sport-specific approach rooted in Hanin’s individual zones of optimal functioning (IZOF) model and the identification-control-correction (ICC) program. The MAP advocates the combined use of both emotion-centered and action-centered strategies toward the optimization of emotional states and athletic performance. Central to the MAP is a 2 × 2 × 2 interplay among performance level (high-low), attention control level (high-low), and hedonic valence level (pleasure-displeasure), which gives rise to multiple dimensional states. Within this framework, performers are guided to identify, regulate, and optimize their functional and dysfunctional emotions and their most relevant components of functional performance patterns. Proficient athletes should be able to consistently adjust their degree of hedonic valence and conscious attention control according to their current state and situational demands. Drawing on the MAP and related research, applied strategies for effective self-regulation in athletes will be discussed.


                                                                                    Presenter: Natalia B. Stambulova

                                                                                    Title: Athletes' dual careers: European research, actions, and policy making

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                                                                                    Author: Natalia B. Stambulova, Halmstad University, Sweden

                                                                                    Abstract: This presentation aims to overview contemporary perspectives on athletes’ dual (sport and education) career emphasizing links between research, actions, and policy making particularly as characterizing work done in Europe. The Dual Career (DC) approach in European Union (EU) countries is characterized by separate settings responsible for the provision of sport (sport clubs) and education (schools, universities), and therefore special arrangements are needed between these settings to facilitate athletes’ DCs. During the last decade, several steps have been undertaken to support athletes’ DCs. First, the European Commission financed pilot DC projects, and their findings contributed to the policy document “The EU Guidelines on Dual Careers of Athletes” (2012). These Guidelines suggested a minimal standard for DC programs within the EU and encouraged development of national DC guidelines. Second, the EU Guidelines fueled DC research in Europe that resulted, for example, in the Special Issue of Psychology of Sport and Exercise “Dual career development and transition” (Stambulova & Wylleman, 2015). Third, several new DC projects were financed by the European Commission in 2012-17. One of them “Gold in Education and Elite Sport” (Wylleman, De Brandt, & Defruyt, 2017) took a holistic developmental perspective (Wylleman, Reints, & De Knop, 2013) to investigate competencies of 15-25 year old DC athletes and the competencies of DC support providers (DCSP) who aim to help athletes deal with DC challenges. Forth, based on this latter project, actions have been taken in each of nine participated countries; e.g., in Sweden, the project findings contributed to the development of a national model of DCSP education and Swedish DC Guidelines (Swedish Sports Confederation, 2017).


                                                                                    Presenter: Nicolas Lemyre

                                                                                    Title: Motivations processes and their implications for burnout propensity in sport

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                                                                                    Author: Nicolas Lemyre, Norwegian University of Sport Science, Oslo, Norway

                                                                                    Abstract: Not all athletes thrive and experience meaningful, enjoyable and satisfying engagement. Indeed, some athletes report feelings and cognitions associated with burnout; i.e., emotional and physical exhaustion, a devaluation of their sport participation, and a reduced sense of accomplishment (Raedeke & Smith, 2001). Grounded in Self Determination Theory (Ryan & Deci, 2000, 2017) as well as achievement goal frameworks, research has examined the implications of the coaches’ interpersonal style (or variations in the motivational climate, motivation regulations, basic need satisfaction in regard to the likelihood of athletes’ reporting burnout symptoms. In general, existent studies suggest particular coach-created environments (e.g., those marked by controlling and ego-involving behaviours), motivational perspectives (e.g., more controlled motivation regulations), and athletes’ reporting of low satisfaction or even thwarting of their needs to feel competent, personal autonomy and relatedness make it more likely that heightened burnout will occur. Intervention strategies will be presented that should help reduce the incidence of athletes’ burning out and facilitate a more optimal and health conducive sport engagement.

                                                                                    Discussant: Robert J Vallerand, Universite due Quebec a Montreal

                                                                                    IAAP Division 13: Traffic and Transportation Psychology

                                                                                    IAAP Division 14: Applied Cognitive Psychology

                                                                                    IAAP Division 15: Psychology Students

                                                                                    IAAP Division 16: Counselling Psychology


                                                                                    Paul J. Hartung

                                                                                    Paul J. Hartung

                                                                                    Focus of Lecture: Ten years of life designing: advances and future directions

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                                                                                    Sponsoring Division: Division 16:Counselling

                                                                                    Abstract: The year 2019 will mark ten years since the original statement of life designing as a new, internationally-constructed paradigm for careers science and practice (Savickas, et al., 2009). This paper will examine life designing in retrospect and prospect as a paradigm for career studies and career intervention around the globe. Life designing-based theories, research, and practices will be reviewed to identify advances, gaps, and possible future directions for careers science and practice. Life designing offers positive direction for the careers field to advance human health and well-being and move the field from the margins to the mainstream of psychology and counseling. Continuing to adopt and advance life designing counseling principles and practices helps transform career counseling from a straightforward, logical pursuit to a complex, therapeutic endeavor to assist people to inscribe their lives with purpose and direction. With continuing efforts led by approaches such as career construction theory and practice, long-held distinctions between career and personal counseling will give way to evolving a perspective on work as central to counseling for mental health and well-being. Doing so may yield the most desirable effect of attracting more students and professionals to the careers field. Original goals of the life design paradigm will continue to propel it as a model for meaningfully construing and constructing work and career in human life.

                                                                                    Bio: Paul J. Hartung, Ph.D. is Professor of Family and Community Medicine at Northeast Ohio Medical University. He has authored over 80 journal articles and book chapters and co-edited three books dealing with career development theory and practice. Currently, he is editor for The Career Development Quarterly and serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Vocational Behavior and Journal of Career Assessment. Prof. Hartung is a fellow of the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP; Division 16), the American Psychological Association (Division 17), and the National Career Development Association. He is a past recipient of the APA Division 17 John L. Holland award for achievement in career and personality research. Since 2014, Prof. Hartung has served as President-Elect, Division 16 (Counseling Psychology) of the IAAP.

                                                                                    Affiliation: Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Northeast Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, Ohio, USA


                                                                                    Gudbjörg Vilhjálmsdóttir

                                                                                    Gudbjörg Vilhjálmsdóttir

                                                                                    Focus of Lecture: Narrative semiotics and the career construction interview

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                                                                                    Sponsoring Division: Division 16:Counselling

                                                                                    Abstract: Narrative counseling is increasingly used in career counselling. One can speak of a ‘narrative turn’. Many techniques have been developed in recent years, of which Mark Savickas’s Career Construction Interview (CCI) is one of the most theoretically elaborate. Though narrative counseling and narrative psychology have used theories and techniques from literary studies, there is still much to learn from them. Based on my experience as a counselor and on my recent research I will discuss how the use of a certain number of concepts and techniques associated with the narrative semiotics of A.J. Greimas can refine and enrich narrative counseling, with special regard to Savickas's Career Construction Interview (CCI). In particular I will demonstrate that training in the systematic search for so-called isotopies and the use of the analytic tools of the actantial model and the semiotic square can improve counselors’ ability to help their clients construct a meaningful story out of their lives and set out a pathway to attain future goals.

                                                                                    Bio: Gudbjörg or Gugga Vilhjálmsdóttir, Ph. D. is a full Professor in career guidance and counselling and Head of Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of Iceland. Her research projects are within career development theory and currently with an emphasis on Savickas‘ career constructivism. The development of a career adaptability measure and literary analysis of narratives in career construction counseling have figured among recent research projects, as well as the history of school and career counselling in Iceland. Furthermore, she has conducted two quantitative research projects where Bourdieu‘s habitus theory is used to throw light on the links between social variables and career choice. An ongoing research interest has been the evaluation of career education and counselling, both in Iceland and in the Nordic countries. Dr. Vilhjálmsdóttir received the NCDA international award in 2006 (National Career Development Association) for her work in developing the counselling profession in Iceland. She is an honorary member of the Icelandic Association of School and Career Counsellors. Dr. Vilhjálmsdóttir is a board member of the European Society of Vocational Design and Career Counselling. She was recently elected as the representative of the Nordic countries on the board of the International Association of Educational and Vocational Guidance.

                                                                                    Affiliation: Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, School of Social Sciences, Gimli. University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland


                                                                                    Maria Eduarda Duarte & Paul J. Hartung

                                                                                    Maria Eduarda Duarte & Paul J. Hartung

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: Counseling Psychology: Reflecting on the Past, Envisioning the Future

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                                                                                    Nominating Division/Section: Division 16:Counselling

                                                                                    Abstract: The symposiasts will highlight the importance of counseling psychology around the globe by considering two main aspects: a reflection on the past and an envisioning of the future. The presentations and discussion will include career counseling in (South) Africa and how to use retrospection to build prospects for the future and transform perceived challenges into opportunities, presented by Kobus Maree. Career counseling, diversity, connectedness, narrative, and story within a systems theory framework will be presented by Mary McMahon (Australia). Zhi-Jin Hou (China) will discuss the challenges and opportunities of counseling psychology in China. Fred Leong (USA) will talk about the diversified Portfolio Model of adaptability, positing that diversified investment in multiple life experiences, life roles, and relationships promotes positive adaptation to life’s challenges. Marucia Bardagi (Brazil) will discuss diversity in South America’s counseling theories and interventions.

                                                                                    Bio:

                                                                                    Affiliation:

                                                                                    Presenter: Jacobus Gideon (Kobus) Maree

                                                                                    Title: Theoretical reflections and practical suggestions on reshaping and adapting career theory and practice

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                                                                                    Abstract: The world of work is changing rapidly. Under- and unemployment rates across the world are rising steadily, and inequality is spiralling. A high premium is placed on dealing effectively with work-related transitions. Career theorists and practitioners have to rethink their theory and practice continually and devise appropriate strategies for the workplace. A qualitative→/+quantitative paradigm is used. Theoretical reflections on career counselling’s response to what is happening in society and, more particularly, the workplace are provided first. Examples from two research projects are then given of contextualizing, decontextualizing, recontextualizing, and co-contextualizing in qualitative and quantitative research (in disadvantaged contexts in particular). The findings demonstrate the importance of relating contextual challenges to career counselling issues and concepts and of embracing newer ideas such as career and self-construction and life design (in addition to more traditional approaches). Dealing with policy matters is essential before the focus can be shifted to policy implementation. Career counselling theory and practice in developing countries in particular differ from context to context. Traditional career counselling still predominates even though what works well in one part of the world may not work elsewhere because of socioeconomic and cultural disparities. Relating contextual challenges to career counselling concepts is essential. Ongoing contextualization, decontextualization, recontextualization, and co-contextualization of career counselling theory and practice is the way forward theoretically and practically to help clients flourish instead of merely ‘survive’ in the 4th industrial revolution (Work 4.0). It will also enhance the short-, medium-, and longer-term effect of career counselling globally.

                                                                                    Background/Rationale: The world of work is changing rapidly. Under- and unemployment rates across the world are rising steadily, and inequality is spiralling. A high premium is placed on dealing effectively with work-related transitions. Career theorists and practitioners have to rethink their theory and practice continually and devise appropriate strategies for the workplace.Methods: A qualitative→/+quantitative paradigm is used. Theoretical reflections on career counselling’s response to what is happening in society and, more particularly, the workplace are provided first. Examples from two research projects are then given of contextualizing, decontextualizing, recontextualizing, and co-contextualizing in qualitative and quantitative research (in disadvantaged contexts in particular). Results: The findings demonstrate the importance of relating contextual challenges to career counselling issues and concepts and of embracing newer ideas such as career and self-construction and life design (in addition to more traditional approaches). Dealing with policy matters is essential before the focus can be shifted to policy implementation.Conclusions: Career counselling theory and practice in developing countries in particular differ from context to context. Traditional career counselling still predominates even though what works well in one part of the world may not work elsewhere because of socioeconomic and cultural disparities. Relating contextual challenges to career counselling concepts is essential. Action/Impact: Ongoing contextualization, decontextualization, recontextualization, and co-contextualization of career counselling theory and practice is the way forward theoretically and practically to help clients flourish instead of merely ‘survive’ in the 4th industrial revolution (Work 4.0). It will also enhance the short-, medium-, and longer-term effect of career counselling globally.

                                                                                    Affiliation: Department of Educational Psychology, Faculty of Education, University of Pretoria, Groenkloof Campus, Groenkloof, South Africa


                                                                                    Presenter: Mary McMahon

                                                                                    Title: Systems mapping: A foundation for telling career stories

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                                                                                    Abstract: Career development is a complex and dynamic process that may be accommodated by systems thinking. Emanating from general systems theory, systems thinking recognises the inseparability of parts and wholes. Systems thinking permeates most contemporary career theories which in general have afforded greater attention to the context in which career development occurs. The Systems Theory Framework (STF) of career development is specifically derived from systems theory. Corresponding with greater recognition of context has been greater emphasis on narrative approaches to career counselling which encourage clients to tell their career stories. Practical applications of the STF employ systems mapping to assist adults and adolescents to construct and tell rich systemic stories. My System of Career influences (MSCI) is a systems mapping process based on the STF. The aim of this research was to investigate how systems thinking and systems mapping facilitates the telling of career stories by adolescents. The case studies of two secondary school students who completed the MSCI systems mapping exercise as a basis for telling their career stories will be presented. The findings revealed rich contextual career stories that considered relationships with significant others such as parents and also influential experiences from a range of settings including home, school, part-time work, and sport. The findings suggest that systems thinking can be taught and that systems mapping provides a foundation and stimulus for the telling of rich integrative systemic career stories. Systems thinking and systems mapping offer a future agenda for career research and practice.

                                                                                    Bio: University of Queensland, Carindale, Queensland, Australia


                                                                                    Presenter: Zhi-Jin Hou

                                                                                    Title: The Challenges and Opportunities of Counseling Psychology in China

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                                                                                    Background: Although the emerging need for mental health in China is rapidly increasing, there are not enough well-trained professionals to offer high quality services. The trainings in universities is still not enough. Therefore, how to meet the thriving needs is a big challenge and also opportunity for counseling psychology.
                                                                                    Methods: Personal interview and focus group will be used to investigate university counseling centers’ directors, counseling professors, students in counseling programs. CQR analysis will be used to analysis the data.
                                                                                    Action/Impact: The coping strategies from macro level and micro level will be discussed and the reform suggestions for training will be proposed. More cooperation among counseling, clinical psychology, social work and collaboration among universities, communities, and professional organizations will be advocated.
                                                                                    Abstract Summary: With the speedy change of the society in China, the emerging need for mental health is rapidly increasing in recent years. However, lack of well-trained professional counseling psychologist is a big challenge for this situation. Little studies have been done to examine what are the specific challenges and risks for professional trainings from different perspectives. The purpose of current study is to investigate how counseling centers’ directors and professors (representing the employers) and students (representing the potential employees) think about the situation in counseling field. Relevant government documents on mental health issues, counseling program requirements for students and mental health news on social media in recent month will be collected in order to generate interview questions. Then we will do interviews with university centers’ directors, community mental health centers’ directors, counseling professors and students in counseling programs about how they perceived the mental health situation in China, and the challenges of professional trainings they have met in their organizations. Finally, we will use the consensual qualitative research (CQR) method to analysis the transcripts of interviews and try to establish an ecosystem model. The coping strategies and reform suggestions will be proposed, especially the cooperation among government, university, community and professional organizations.

                                                                                    Authors::
                                                                                    Zhi-Jin Hou, Faculty of Nursing, Jiujiang University, Jiujiang City, The People’s Republic of China
                                                                                    Jing Ni, School of Psychology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, The People’s Republic of China
                                                                                    Zhihong Qiao, School of Psychology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, The People’s Republic of China
                                                                                    Sili Zhou, China women's university, Beijing, The People’s Republic of China


                                                                                    Presenter: Frederick T. L. Leong

                                                                                    Title: TBC

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                                                                                    Background: A new model of adaptability, the Diversified Portfolio Model (DPM) of Adaptability, is introduced. In the 1950s, Markowitz developed the financial portfolio model by demonstrating that investors could optimize the ratio of risk and return on their portfolios through risk diversification. The Model: The DPM integrates attractive features of a variety of models of adaptability, including Linville’s Self-complexity Model, the Risk and Resilience Model, and Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory. The DPM draws on the concept of portfolio diversification, positing that diversified investment in multiple life experiences, life roles, and relationships promotes positive adaptation to life’s challenges. Impact: The DPM provides an integrative model of adaptability across the biopsychosocial levels of functioning. More importantly, the DPM addresses a gap in the literature by illuminating the antecedents of adaptive processes studied in a broad array of psychological models. The DPM is described in relation to the biopsychosocial model and propositions are offered regarding its utility in increasing adaptiveness. This new model of adaptability will be useful to counselors and psychotherapists by integrating the dimensions of positive psychology and diversity which are central tenets in the field of Counseling Psychology. Conclusions: We believe that the integration of the diversified portfolio model into psychology can contribute to the advancement of the discipline. In this paper, we outline the foundations of the model, present testable research propositions and offer recommendations for future research.

                                                                                    Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA


                                                                                    Presenter: Marucia Patta Bardagi

                                                                                    Title: Career guidance in South America: Same concerns, different solutions

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                                                                                    Abstract: Diversity in South America’s counseling theories and interventions is a well-known characteristic, based on main influences each country have in terms of psychological and sociopolitical affiliations. Through a literature review of publications from the last 15 years and by consulting career guidance/counseling associations, we aimed to describe main research topics, number of counselors working in different workplaces, and some future directions to research and practice. Among results, it is visible that psychodynamic, Marxist and developmental approaches are emphasized both in research and interventions. Very little is done in terms of public policies in career counseling and development, and that is the main concern of researchers and practitioners. A large number of publications are related to intervention descriptions, but empirical and longitudinal studies are increasing in the continent. Only few of the analyzed publications are written in English and published in north American or European journals, which indicates little internationalization. Although different countries in the continent need to address their specific challenges for counseling in different and extreme opposite social, economic and educational conditions, there is a necessity of improving counseling training and evaluation methods all over the continent, and moreover, there is an urgency to bring visibility to South Americas’ research and counseling results, and spread the good practices and results south American counsellors are obtaining in group interventions and in helping people in high vulnerability contexts.

                                                                                    Authors:
                                                                                    Marucia Patta Bardagi, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, Brazil
                                                                                    Marco Teixeira, Universidade Federal de Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
                                                                                    Rodolfo Ambiel, Universidade de S. Francisco, Campinas, Brazil


                                                                                    Susan C. Whiston & David L. Blustein

                                                                                    Susan C. Whiston & David L. Blustein

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: The Impact of Work in an Age of Uncertainty

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                                                                                    Nominating Division/Section: Division 16:Counselling

                                                                                    Abstract: In this presentation, the major findings from a comprehensive qualitative study of working in the U.S., known as the Boston College Working Project, are presented. This study explored the experiences of 61 adults using a purposive sample from a diverse array of settings and backgrounds. Guiding the project are a number of assumptions derived from the psychology of working framework and theory. First, working, at its best, can link us to a sense of being fully alive in the world. Second, working exposes people to the full range of social and economic problems that are endemic in our society. Third, working can fulfill a number of fundamental needs, including the need for survival, social connection, and self-determination. In this study, this need framework has been expanded to encompass the need to contribute to the social good, need to care for others, and the need to work without oppression and marginalization.

                                                                                    The results highlight the cohering theme that two profoundly disparate experiences of working exist within the U.S.; some work for survival and struggle to eke out an existence while others work for self-determination and experience feelings of satisfaction and accomplishment in their work lives. In addition, this study identified a growing sense of social and psychological erosion in the workplace, which was manifested in increased self- and other blame, as well as a fragmented sense of security. The presentation will conclude with future research directions and implications for public policy based on the very rich findings from this study.
                                                                                    Background/Rationale: Much knowledge about the future of work is based on quantitative research, neglecting the insights from individuals who are living in the midst of a radically transforming work context. The project described in this presentation is designed to fill a growing gap in the literature on the future of work.Methods: The participants were obtained via an intentional process of seeking out a broad range of people who are engaged in either seeking work or working. The overall qualitative method that we used in this project is based on an adaptation of narrative inquiry with an infusion of content analysis.
                                                                                    Results: The results yielded a comprehensive perspective on the nature of working in contemporary America, culminating in a broadened taxonomy of needs that working can fulfill and numerous insights into the ways in which working evokes both a sense of aliveness and despair.
                                                                                    Conclusions: For the participants working primarily for survival, the growth of precarious work and neo-liberal policies has profoundly eroded decent and dignified work. Those with more resources, education, and volition are also struggling, although in a very different way than those who are struggling to sustain their livelihoods.
                                                                                    Action/Impact: The presentation will examine the impact of these findings, highlighting a number of implications for individuals who are seeking ways to manage the workplace. Also, implications for public policy will be summarized, underscoring the role of applied psychologists as informed advocates for more humane and decent work options for all.

                                                                                    Bio:

                                                                                    Affiliation: Susan C. Whiston, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA
                                                                                    David L. Blustein, Boston College, Department of Counseling, Development, and Educational Psychology, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA

                                                                                    Presenter: Susan Whiston

                                                                                    Title: Meta-analyses of career choice interventions: Providing effective interventions

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                                                                                    Abstract: This presentation will summarize the findings from a set of meta-analyses on career choice interventions. A random-effects meta-analysis of all outcomes included 57 published and unpublished studies and produced an average weighted effect size of .35. Seven separate meta-analysis were conducted on the outcome measures of vocational identify, career maturity, career decidedness, career decision-making self-efficacy, perceived environmental support, perceived career barriers, and outcome expectation. Studies that utilized the outcome of career decision-making self-efficacy had the largest effect size (.45). Although this effect size was homogenous, tentative moderator analyses were conducted and counselor support was found to be most important. Implication for practice and future research will be discussed.

                                                                                    Background /rationale: It has been almost 20 years since the last meta-analysis of career counseling (i.e., Brown & Ryan Krane, 2000) was conducted. This meta-analysis is a replication and extension of Brown and Krane.
                                                                                    Method: Seven random-effects meta-analyses were conducted using 57 studies.
                                                                                    Results: Of the seven meta-analyses that were conducted, career decision making self-efficacy had the largest effect size (.45). Moderator analyses indicated that counselor support (ES = .83) and values clarification (ES = .52) are critical ingredients in career choice counseling.
                                                                                    Conclusion: The weighted average effect size of .35 is consistent with previous research. The critical ingredients of counselor support and values clarification are different from the critical ingredients found by Brown and Ryan Krane.
                                                                                    Action/Impact: It is important to provide effective services to help individuals make career choices and this meta-analysis has critical findings related to providing efficacious services.

                                                                                    Bio:


                                                                                    Presenter: Whitney Erby; AJ Diamonti; Lily Konowitz; Erin Kilbury; Ellen Gutowski; Alekzander Davila; Chad Oll; David L. Blustein

                                                                                    Title: Historical marginalization and modern employment precarity: African-American experiences in the Boston College Working Project

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                                                                                    Abstract: Precarious work is increasingly endemic in the modern economy. We have to know more about the particularity of how groups perceive precarious work. African-Americans have historically faced marginalization at work; as such, it is important to examine how the history and current experience of racism relates to the growth of precarious work. To begin to explore this question, we conducted a qualitative study based in narrative inquiry, which revealed that African-Americans in this study cope with precarious work situations in different ways. For some, tensions between work and family were the most salient; some viewed precarious work as a stepping stone to further opportunities, while others viewed it as the result of marginalization. Implications for career counselors and public policy decisions will be discussed.
                                                                                    Background /Rationale: Precarious work is increasingly endemic in the modern economy. Given the historic and current challenges that marginalized communities face in their work lives in the U.S., we believe that an in-depth examination of the growth of precarious work is particularly critical for African-Americans.
                                                                                    Methods: As part of a larger study of work experiences, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine individuals self-identifying as Black or of African descent. The interviews were analyzed and coded using narrative inquiry methodology, which goes beyond merely reporting what participants shared by embedding participant impressions into a meaning-making framework. Results: The results reveal African-Americans in this study cope with precarious work situations in different ways. For some, tensions between work and family were the most salient, some viewed precarious work as a stepping stone to further opportunities, while others viewed it as the result of marginalization. Conclusions: The relationship between work and social connections, barriers to advancement, and work as a source of motivation were prominent for the African-Americans in this study. Additionally, underemployment and unemployment were dominant themes.
                                                                                    Action /Impact: Understanding how precarious work affects African-American workers has significant implications for career counselors and policy makers. Effective policies and evidence based interventions are necessary to better serve African-American workers.

                                                                                    Authors:
                                                                                    Whitney Erby
                                                                                    AJ Diamonti
                                                                                    Lily Konowitz
                                                                                    Erin Kilbury
                                                                                    Ellen Gutowski
                                                                                    Alekzander Davila
                                                                                    Chad Oll
                                                                                    David L. Blustein


                                                                                    Teresa Maria Sgaramella

                                                                                    Teresa Maria Sgaramella

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: Resources and needs of migrant and refugee youth: giving voice to different actors in different contexts for a positive and future oriented counseling

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                                                                                    Nominating Division/Section: Division 16:Counselling

                                                                                    Abstract: Active participation and future life construction of asylum seekers, migrant and refugee youth are a challenge for professionals whether they deal with health/school counseling or career guidance. Here the most adequate approaches to assessment and intervention are still under debate, as well as the way cultural background of the country of origin, and personal history can be taken into account in counseling actions.
                                                                                    A positive contextual approach underlines the symposium. Findings from both qualitative and quantitative studies conducted in countries with a different long lasting experience in migration phenomena will be described. Suggestions to professionals interested in an active participation and life design construction of young migrants will be then provided.
                                                                                    The peculiarity of the symposium deals with the approach undertaken, that is giving voice to both migrant youth and professionals, and conducting an analysis of both needs and psychological resources available to migrant youth, and addressing both school and career guidance issues to find out an fil rouge in counselors’ actions.
                                                                                    The emphasis on exchange among psychologists from around the world in their common effort of finding science-based solutions to “real world” problems, namely in counseling practice, further link the analysis carried out to the congress goals.
                                                                                    The first presentation gives voice to migrant youth in Italian context and highlights individual resources they ascribe to themselves, besides barriers they experience in school and family, for their successful inclusion and life designing.
                                                                                    The second presentation by describing works on resettling stressors, underlines the relevance of a positive reading of personal history in school counselling together with suggestions for counselling practice in school and community-based supports for refugee youth and families in Canada.
                                                                                    The third presentation opens the view to their future life construction by focusing on what career guidance counsellors and practitioners need to know about the guidance needs and experiences of asylum-seeking, refugee and migrant youth in order to support their work life designing.
                                                                                    Findings from recent reports in several European countries with different experience on migration issues and challenges will be provided, together with results from actions and programs currently under implementation.
                                                                                    The discussant will summarize findings reported and highlight the impact on counseling practice.
                                                                                    Among others issues she will also discuss what is there specific in the vulnerable condition experienced by migrant youth with respect to other vulnerabilities of different origin, and the actions foreseen or under implementation.

                                                                                    Bio:

                                                                                    Affiliation: Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Education and Applied Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy

                                                                                    Presenter: Teresa Sgaramella

                                                                                    Title: TBC

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                                                                                    Abstract:

                                                                                    Bio:


                                                                                    Presenter: Lea Ferrari

                                                                                    Title: Positive resources and future: a comparison between Italian and migrant youth in vocational high schools

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                                                                                    Background/rationale: This study found its rationale in the literature on acculturation that shows migrants prefer integration strategies and these are related to high level of adaptation. It aims to explore differences between Italian and migrant students as concern positive involved in successful life designing.
                                                                                    Methods: Ninety-three vocational high school students were involved: 43 of them arrived from South America, East of Europe, North Africa. They answered a quali-quantitative survey that assessed a set of positive resources, acculturation attitudes, strategies for coping with career indecision, barriers and supports.
                                                                                    Results: A series of analysis of variance showed migrant students perceived higher level of courage, resilience, decisional productive coping and propensity to integration than Italian students who recorded higher propensity to assimilation and less negative view of the future. Migrant students who preferred integration strategies showed also higher level of hope, optimism and decisional productive coping. Thematic analyses showed more frequent barriers in migrant adolescents concerning family problems and relationships with peers. Studying difficulties similarly occurred in both groups. Optimism and waiting something positive happen were strategies migrant youth considered more useful; focus on the problem and work hard were more useful for Italian students.
                                                                                    Conclusions: Results suggest working with migrant students requires to value integration strategies, to devote attention to contextual factors and promoting strategies focused on the problem.
                                                                                    Action/Impact: Implication for equity and inclusion will be discussed.

                                                                                    Affiliation: Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Education and Applied Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy


                                                                                    Presenter: Rosalynn Record-Lemon and Marla Buchanan

                                                                                    Title: School-Based Support for Canadian Refugee Children and Youth: Experiences of Implementing a Trauma-Informed Counselling Program

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                                                                                    Background/Rationale: Canada has experienced a recent influx of refugee claimants who have sought resettlement due to violence, war, crime, and/or fear of persecution (UNHCR Canada, 2016). School-based supports and resources can potentially play a key role in facilitating the adjustment, coping and well-being of refugee children and youth.
                                                                                    Methods: The present study uses narrative inquiry to examine the experiences of school counsellors implementing a standardized school-based trauma-informed program with refugee children and youth. Participants are provided training in the program and are followed throughout their implementation experiences. Thematic content analysis is used to capture themes that emerge in the counsellors’ narratives of their experiences.
                                                                                    Results: Key themes regarding the experiences of school counsellors implementing the program and concerning the support needs of refugee children and youth are described. The findings of this study are discussed with regards to implications for counselling practices and for future research concerning school and community-based supports for refugee children, youth and their families.

                                                                                    Conclusion: School-based trauma-informed counselling programs potentially offer a low-barrier means of providing support to refugee children and youth. Understanding the benefits, challenges and crucial factors required for implementing these programs is an important component of providing support for refugee children and youth.

                                                                                    Action/Impact: The intended impact of the present research is providing detailed insight regarding the experiences of implementing trauma-informed counselling programs with refugee children in Canadian schools and regarding what is needed for future advancement and implementation of trauma-informed programs.

                                                                                    Affiliation:
                                                                                    Rosalynn Record-Lemon, Counselling Psychology, University of British Columbia. Co-Owner and Counsellor - Emergence Counselling and Wellness Group
                                                                                    Marla Buchanan, Royal Canadian Legion Professorship in Group Counselling and Trauma, Counselling Psychology, University of British Columbia


                                                                                    Presenter: Hazel Reid

                                                                                    Title: Researching the career guidance needs of asylum-seeking, refugee and migrant populations: a case study from the UK.

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                                                                                    Background/rationale: The presentation draws on a UK literature review and needs analysis for a three year EU project, to develop curriculum material for the training and professional development of career guidance counsellors working with migrant and refugee populations. The project includes Germany, Sweden, Italy, Turkey, Lithuania and the UK.
                                                                                    Methods: The literature was organised around potential themes for a curriculum. Semi structured interviews were used for the needs analysis and the summary shared with participants.
                                                                                    Results: The findings across the five countries surveyed were very similar, indicating that whilst there is considerable literature on services for migrant and refugee populations within education and employment practice, there is very little specifically related to career guidance and counselling. The needs analysis was undertaken with expert career guidance practitioners, student career guidance counsellors, lecturers working in HE on relevant programmes, counsellors working with migrant and refugee clients within charitable organisations, and a former refugee. The results of the needs analyses across the five countries, again, was very similar.
                                                                                    Conclusions: The presentation will focus on the UK findings from the first two stages of the project, the literature review and the needs analysis. It will highlight what was found in the literature review, but focus on the needs analysis - what career guidance counsellors and practitioners need to know about the guidance needs and experiences of asylum-seeking, refugee and migrant populations. To illuminate the presentation quotes from the former refugee will be included.
                                                                                    Action/Impact: A significant ‘stand-alone’, or integrated course will be designed, tested and disseminated.

                                                                                    Affiliation : Professor of Education & Career Management, Faculty of Education, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent, UK


                                                                                    Presenter: Peyman Abkhezr, Mary McMahon, Kevin Glasheen, and Marilyn Campbell

                                                                                    Title: A narrative inquiry into life-career stories of young African people with refugee backgrounds: Re-contextualising agency

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                                                                                    Background: Challenging circumstances before and after resettlement impact young people with refugee backgrounds’ (YRB) sense of voice and agency that limit their career development options. Little research has been conducted on the career development of YRB after resettlement, particularly qualitative research that can generate culturally and contextually pertinent experience-near data that could identify potential relevant ways of assisting them with their career development needs after resettlement.
                                                                                    Methods: Narrative inquiry facilitated the exploration of five participants’ life-career stories through interviews. Data was analysed using voice centred relational analysis.
                                                                                    Findings: The unique plot of each participant’s story reflected the operation of various voices, relationships and social structures, influential in constantly reshaping future career plans throughout the migration journey. Participants’ reflections on the experience of participating in narrative inquiry interviews and storying their life-career stories suggested an enhancement of their sense of agency.
                                                                                    Conclusions: A re-contextualisation of previous life-career stories of YRB that reflected their strength, skills and achievements in their post-resettlement context through storytelling and narrative inquiry was a useful process that enhanced their sense of agency.
                                                                                    Implications: The possibility of working with YRB as career storytellers and the usefulness of narrative approaches to career counselling for finding voice and enhancing their sense of agency was clarified.

                                                                                    Affiliation:
                                                                                    Peyman Abkhezr, Queensland University of Technology, Faculty of Education, School of Early Childhood and Inclusive Education, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia
                                                                                    Mary McMahon, The University of Queensland, School of Education, School of Education, The University of Queensland, St Lucia Campus, Brisbane, Australia
                                                                                    Kevin Glasheen, Queensland University of Technology, Faculty of Education, School of Early Childhood and Inclusive Education, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia
                                                                                    Marilyn Campbell, Queensland University of Technology, Faculty of Education, School of Early Childhood and Inclusive Education, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia

                                                                                    Discussant: Mary McMahon


                                                                                    Frederick T. Leong

                                                                                    Frederick T. Leong

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: Cross-Cultural Career Interventions

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                                                                                    Nominating Division/Section: Division 16:Counselling

                                                                                    Background: It is has long been acknowledged that the field of vocational psychology has been dominated by Eurocentric models. Recent work on our overemphasis on Western Educated Industrialized Rich Democratic (WEIRD) samples in Psychology provides additional confirmation of this problem. Furthermore, most of the models of career interventions have been formulated and focused on the United States. The purpose of this symposium is to counter that trend by examining career interventions in different countries and cultures.
                                                                                    Focus of Symposium: This symposium, to be presented by career psychology experts from multiple countries, will highlight how the cultural context and cultural differences may influence the models, methods, and measures used in these career interventions. Instead of the usual single discussant at the end of the symposium, the discussion portion will consist of a dialogue among presenters in comparing and contrasting their models with questions from the audience.
                                                                                    Presenters: Each presenter will provide an overview of their model of career intervention and discuss the practical challenges for career interventions in their cultural context and also the future research directions needed to advance the field. The presenters have been selected to represent multiple countries and cultures: Maria Paul Paixao from Portugal, Rodolfo Ambiel from Brazil, Jean Hou from China, and Frederick Leong from the United States.
                                                                                    Action/Impact: This symposium will stimulate more theory building and research regarding career interventions embedded within various countries and highlight the importance adaptation to cultural contexts that illustrate the value indigenous approaches.

                                                                                    Bio:

                                                                                    Affiliation: Michigan State University, Department of Psychology, East Lansing, Michigan, USA

                                                                                    Presenter: Maria Paul Paixao from Portugal,

                                                                                    Title: TBC

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                                                                                    Abstract:

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                                                                                    Presenter: Rodolfo Ambiel from Brazil,

                                                                                    Title: TBC

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                                                                                    Abstract:

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                                                                                    Presenter: Jean Hou from China

                                                                                    Title: TBC

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                                                                                    Abstract:

                                                                                    Affiliation:


                                                                                    Presenter: Frederick Leong from the United States

                                                                                    Title: TBC

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                                                                                    Abstract:

                                                                                    Affiliation:


                                                                                    Valérie Cohen-Scali & Jacques Poyaud

                                                                                    Valérie Cohen-Scali & Jacques Poyaud

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: Perception of work and the future among low qualified youths in northern and southern countries: first results of an international qualitative research project

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                                                                                    Nominating Division/Section: Division 16:Counselling

                                                                                    Abstract: The globalization of the economy has led, in many countries, to an increase in precarious work and the informal economy. Young people are among the most affected by these changes in the world of work and few of them are employed in decent work. A qualitative research project has been implemented on both objective and subjective aspects of work among a population of young workers with low levels of education in different parts of the world. The symposium aims are to present the first results of our research findings and to draw new lines of career counseling interventions for young people in precarious work situations. Guðbjörg Vilhjálmsdóttir will present research based on narratives of Icelandic young workers showing that their work is generally conceived as temporary and that they hope to have better work in the future. Valérie Cohen-Scali et al. will present a comparison of young low-educated workers’ representations regarding work from three countries and will underline the role of social and cultural contexts on career counseling interventions. Donna San Antonio will focus her presentation on rural American young workers and on the factors that may contribute to stifling or supporting resilience and hope for the future. Marcelo Ribeiro et al. have compared representations of work of young workers from Portugal and from Brazil and observed different forms of decent work according to the working contexts conditions and dynamics. David Blustein will discuss the results of these different research studies and provide some insights about the lines to draw for the future in career counseling policy and practice.
                                                                                    Background: The globalization of the economy has led, in many countries, to an increase in precarious work and the informal economy. Young people are among the most affected by these changes in the world of work and few of them are employed in decent work.
                                                                                    Methods: A qualitative research project has been implemented on both objective and subjective aspects of work among a population of young workers with low levels of education in different parts of the world.
                                                                                    Results: The symposium aims are to present the first results of our research findings and to draw new lines of career counseling interventions for young people in precarious work situations. Four contributions will be presented.
                                                                                    Conclusion: The presentations underline the diversity of representations of work among young workers and also show some core aspects of them.

                                                                                    Impact: The symposium must provide new perspective to study work and enrich the definition of decent work taking into account the subjective relationship to work of individuals in different parts of the world.

                                                                                    Sponsor: ESVDC AND UNESCO UNITWIN NETWORK
                                                                                    “Life designing interventions (counseling, guidance, education) for decent work and sustainable development” (2017-2022)

                                                                                    Affiliation: Valérie Cohen-Scali, Inetop-Cnam & University of Bordeaux, Paris, France
                                                                                    Jacques Poyaud, University of Bordeaux - Laboratory of Psychology, University of Bordeaux, Paris, France

                                                                                    Presenter: Guðbjörg Vilhjálmsdóttir, University of Iceland

                                                                                    Title: “This is ‘in-between work’…you might work here for a year and then you find something else”: Representations of decent work among young people with low employment skills

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                                                                                    Abstract: Although work has become more precarious in today’s societies it is still greatly valued. Work needs to be meaningful in order to form a basis of self-respect and access to decent work is a fundamental aspect of well-being. Finding decent work is a challenge for young people who have no formal training after compulsory education. The results from ten interviews with people from age 20 to 24 are reported. The participants have had no formal training after leaving compulsory education at the age of 16. The data will be analyzed with a thematic content analysis grid designed collectively by the international study group. Preliminary findings suggest that the participants are preoccupied with their failures at school and with the hindrances they are experiencing in their working life. They are also experiencing the downside of the social class system. Participants stay in their jobs because of the money, but not because they like the job in particular. Young people without formal training after compulsory education find themselves in a position of pursuing jobs for the money and not finding jobs that are meaningful to them. Young people in this situation should be assisted in finding meaningful work, similar to their peers that have remained in the educational system. Actions that reach out to young adults without any formal training can be to develop psychometric measures and counselling methods. Development of psychometric measures of decent work and work situation could be undertaken in order to examine whether they are experiencing decent work, both objectively and subjectively.

                                                                                    Background/rationale: Although work has become more precarious in today’s societies it is still greatly valued. Work needs to be meaningful in order to form a basis of self-respect and access to decent work is a fundamental aspect of well-being. Finding decent work is a challenge for young people who have no formal training after compulsory education.

                                                                                    Methods: The results from ten interviews with people from age 20 to 24 are reported. The participants have had no formal training after leaving compulsory education at the age of 16. The data will be analyzed with a thematic content analysis grid designed collectively by the international study group.

                                                                                    Results: Preliminary findings suggest that the participants are preoccupied with their failures at school and with the hindrances they are experiencing in their working life. They are also experiencing the down side of the social class system. Participants stay in their jobs, because of the money, but not because they like the job in particular.

                                                                                    Conclusions: Young people without formal training after compulsory education find themselves in a position of pursuing jobs for the money and not finding jobs that are meaningful to them. Young people in this situation should be assisted in finding meaningful work, similar to their peers that have remained in the educational system.

                                                                                    Action/Impact: Actions that reach out to young adults without any formal training can be to develop psychometric measures and counselling methods. Development of psychometric measures of decent work and work situation could be undertaken in order to examine whether they are experiencing decent work, both objectively and subjectively.


                                                                                    Presenter: Valérie Cohen-Scali (Cnam, Paris, France),
                                                                                    Laurence Cocandeau-Bellanger (Catholic University of Angers, France),
                                                                                    Soazig Disquay-Perot (Catholic University of Angers, France),
                                                                                    Jonas Masdonati (University of Lausanne, Switzerland),
                                                                                    Issa Abdou Moumoula (University of Koudougou, Burkina-Faso)

                                                                                    Title: Representations of work among young adults in Europe and Africa and perspectives for career counseling

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                                                                                    Abstract: The precariousness in the labor market has deleterious effects on health and identity of individuals. Young people are particularly exposed to bad quality of work. The aim of the research is to identify and to compare the representations of work among young low educated workers in different parts of the world. Qualitative research has been conducted using open questionnaires. Thirty young adults have been interviewed in three countries: ten in Switzerland, ten in France, and ten in Burkina-Faso. Data have been processed using thematic content analysis and textual data processing software. The results underline the importance of informal work in Burkina Faso as compared to the other countries. It also shows differences between those groups regarding the working conditions. However, similarities are also observed regarding the expectations about work and the place of work in the lives of young people. The research shows the diverse facets of the representations of work among low-educated young workers and the importance of work to them. To build more effective career counseling interventions for low-qualified young workers in developing and developed countries, this research underlines the importance to take into account social, economic, and cultural contexts. Studying the situations of young workers in different parts of the world will allow us to reconsider current career counseling interventions and develop more suitable and efficient career counseling strategies, taking into account the specificities of labor market contexts.
                                                                                    Background: The precariousness in the labor market has deleterious effects on health and identity of individuals. Young people are particularly exposed to bad quality of work. The aim of the research is to identify and to compare the representations of work among young low educated workers in different parts of the world.
                                                                                    Method: Qualitative research has been conducted with open questionnaires. Thirty young adults have been interviewed in three countries: ten in Switzerland, ten in France, and ten in Burkina-Faso. Data have been processed using thematic content analysis and textual data processing software.
                                                                                    Results: The results underline the importance of informal work in Burkina Faso as compared to the other countries. It also shows differences between those groups regarding the working conditions. However, similarities are also observed regarding the expectations about work and the place of work in the lives of the young people.
                                                                                    Conclusion: The research shows the diverse facets of the representations of work among low-educated young workers and the importance of work to them. To build more effective career counseling interventions for low qualified young workers in developing and developed countries, this research underlines the importance to take into account social, economic, and cultural contexts.
                                                                                    Impact: Studying the situations of young workers in different parts of the world allows us to reconsider the current career counseling interventions and develop more suited and efficient career counseling strategies taking into account the specificities of labor market contexts.


                                                                                    Presenter: Donna San Antonio

                                                                                    Title: The Identity Construction--Cultural Context–Aspirational Desire Triangle in the Working Lives of Disadvantaged Rural Emerging Adults

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                                                                                    Abstract: Abstract: After the global recession, employment in the US has rebounded to a ten-year low of 4.1%. However, in rural areas, improvements in rates of employment have lagged behind. For rural emerging adults seeking to be employed in a satisfying job, a high school diploma and acceptance to college is the way out of economically disadvantaged rural areas. But what about the emerging adults without a high school diploma? This presentation will present preliminary findings using narrative analysis of in-depth qualitative interviews with ten, rural, emerging adults who are working and do not have a high school diploma. The focus of this inquiry is on work qualities, such as, personal satisfaction, social connection, working conditions, growth possibilities, agency, and how current work fits into life course planning and future aspiration. The study considers the dynamic relationship among three key theoretical paradigms: Identity construction and meaning-making; socio-cultural context; and aspirational desire unbounded by cultural context. Findings from an earlier study suggest that, while there was regret for decisions made and a feeling of “being left behind” for some research participants, there was also a hopeful sense about the future. For some, however, hopefulness was not articulated. This presentation will explore the factors that may lead to a sense of hope and future orientation for some and not for others. The presentation will call for increased attention to rural areas and specific recommendations will be made for policies and practices for school-based counselors working with adolescents.
                                                                                    Background: In rural areas, improvements in rates of employment have lagged behind urban areas. For rural emerging adults seeking to be employed in a satisfying job, a high school diploma and college acceptance is the way out of economically disadvantaged rural areas. What about emerging adults without a high school diploma?
                                                                                    Methods: This presentation will present preliminary findings using narrative analysis of in-depth qualitative interviews with ten, rural, emerging adults who are working and do not have a high school diploma.
                                                                                    Results: The focus of this inquiry is on work qualities, such as, personal satisfaction, social connection, working conditions, growth possibilities, agency, and how current work fits into life course planning and future aspiration.
                                                                                    Conclusions: Future aspiration is a resilient construct. While there is some regret for decisions made, there is also a sense of future possibility and desire to make a contribution in the social sphere. There are factors that lead to hope and future orientation for some and not for others.

                                                                                    Action/Impact: The presentation will call for increased attention to rural areas and specific recommendations will be made for policies and practices for school-based counselors working with adolescents.

                                                                                    Affiliation: Lesley University, Cambridge, MA, USA


                                                                                    Presenter: Marcelo Afonso Ribeiro - University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)
                                                                                    Paulo Cardoso- University of Évora (Portugal)
                                                                                    Maria Eduarda Duarte - University of Lisbon (Portugal)

                                                                                    Title: Perception of decent work and the future among low qualified youths in Brazil and Portugal: Preliminary results

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                                                                                    Abstract: Brazil and Portugal have different working contexts. While Brazil has mixed formal and informal working environments, formal working contexts prevail in Portugal. These varied contexts have produced different forms and modes of representations of work, understood as personal meanings co-constructed through relationships and practices that guide actions and everyday experiences. By means of in-depth interviews, this study sought to understand and compare the perception of decent work and the future among 20 low qualified youths in Brazil and Portugal through a thematic content analysis of their narratives grounded in life course design paradigm. The main findings of the Brazilian sample have indicated the predominance of a moralistic and mercantile view of working, mainly produced by informal relationship networks and informal learning. And the main findings of the Portuguese sample have shown the predominance of work as mean of survival, autonomy construction, and personal development. A preliminary conclusion suggests that Northern and Southern countries have produced distinct forms of decent work according to working contexts, conditions, and dynamics. Moreover, there may also be a continuum of situations in which the premises of decent work are more or less present. The implications for career guidance and counseling practices to promote decent working trajectories are discussed, as well as the impacts on the international research agenda on this theme.
                                                                                    Background/rationale: Brazil and Portugal have different working contexts. While Brazil has mixed formal and informal working environments, formal working contexts prevail in Portugal. These varied contexts have produced different forms and modes of representation of work, understood as personal meanings co-constructed through relationships and practices that guide actions and everyday experiences.
                                                                                    Methods: By means of in-depth interviews, this study sought to understand and compare the perception of decent work and the future among 20 low qualified youths in Brazil and Portugal through a thematic content analysis of their narratives grounded on Life design paradigm.
                                                                                    Results: The main findings of the Brazilian sample have indicated the predominance of a moralistic and mercantile view of working, mainly produced by informal relationship networks and informal learning. And the main findings of the Portuguese sample have shown the predominance of work as mean of survival, autonomy construction, and personal development.
                                                                                    Conclusions: As a conclusion, Northern and Southern countries have produced distinct forms of decent work according to the working contexts conditions and dynamics. Moreover, there may also be a continuum of situations in which the premises of decent work are more or less present.
                                                                                    Action/impact: The implications for the career guidance and counseling practices to promote decent working trajectories are discussed, as well as the impacts on the international research agenda on this theme.

                                                                                    Discussant: David Blustein


                                                                                    Rachel Gali Cinamon

                                                                                    Rachel Gali Cinamon

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: Career Development of Marginalized‪ Groups: Theoretical and Social Justice Implications‬ ‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬

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                                                                                    Nominating Division/Section: Division 16:Counselling

                                                                                    Abstract: Work experiences of disadvantaged groups receive relatively low empirical attention in generic models of vocational psychology, which, usually focuses upon white western middle-class populations. As a result, our understanding of the complexity of the intersection between the individual and society in the challenging process of career development is limited. The current symposium will shed light upon the career experiences and challenges of vulnerable groups along with relevant and sensitive conceptual frameworks. Blustein and Kenny will present emerging critical perspectives such as humanitarian work psychology and the psychology of working, along with relevant literature on human rights and decent work as a conceptual basis for research and practice. Richard Young’s presentation will describe the unique career challenges of young people who have intellectual or development disabilities, and will provide empirical evidence as to how goal-directed joint action can lead to the construction of life-enhancing careers. Gerstein and Hutchison will summarize three studies on future perceptions of emerging adults from three different locations: Hong Kong, the U.S. and Israel, and suggest culturally social justice initiatives including how psychologists can assist young adults to enhance their quality of life. Cohen-Scali et. al. will present a study on the authentic work experiences of ten young, low-educated workers in Africa and the complexity of work and marginalized youth, and the role of work in the construction of their identity.
                                                                                    Background: Work experiences of disadvantaged groups receive relatively low empirical attention in generic models of vocational psychology, which, usually focuses upon white western middle-class populations. As a result, our understanding of the complexity of the intersection between the individual and society in the challenging process of career development is limited.
                                                                                    Methods: The proposed symposium comprised of four presentations: the first is a conceptual presentation, and the other three describe qualitative studies conducted with marginalized groups from five different countries.
                                                                                    Results: The results of the presented studies emphasize the need for sensitive conceptual frameworks and unique empirical methods in order to learn and understand the role of work in marginalized groups.
                                                                                    Conclusion:These presentations emphasize the need for sensitive conceptual frameworks and unique empirical methods in order to learn and understand the role of work in marginalized groups and in different cultures. They also underline the importance of collaboration between researchers from different fields (e.g. psychology. rehabilitation, education, law).
                                                                                    Action/impact: Cinamon's discussion will focus upon the empirical and practical implications that evolve from these presentations, with particular emphasis upon training curricula in vocational psychology.

                                                                                    Bio:

                                                                                    Affiliation:

                                                                                    Presenter: David L. Blustein and Maureen E. Kenny

                                                                                    Title: Work as a Human Right: Engaging Psychology in the Struggle for Decent Work

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                                                                                    Abstract: This presentation articulates a call for applied psychologists to respond to transformative work challenges by fostering research that will advance the Decent Work Agenda of the United Nations and International Labor Organization. Recent and ongoing changes in the world are contributing to a significant loss of decent work, including a rise of unemployment and precarious work. By failing to satisfy human needs for economic survival, social connection, and self-determination, the loss of decent work undermines individual and societal well-being, particularly for marginalized groups and those without highly marketable skills. We present emerging critical perspectives (e.g., Humanitarian Work Psychology; Psychology of Working) and relevant literatures related to human rights and decent work, which serve as guideposts to the relevant specialties within applied psychology to enrich the knowledge base that will inform efforts to expand access to dignified and decent work. We conclude by offering exemplary research agendas that focus on examining the psychological meaning and impact of economic and social protections, balancing caregiving work and market work, making work more just, and enhancing individual capacities for coping and adapting to changes in the world of work. These examples are intended to stimulate new ideas and initiatives for psychological research pertaining to work as a human right. Background/Rationale: this presentation is based on a critique of existing discourses in applied psychology, which we argue have neglected vast cohorts of people who work and who wish to work. Our rationale for this presentation is embedded in a careful analysis of contemporary applied psychology practices and scholarship. Methods: The material presented in this presentation is not a formal empirical study or a literature review; rather, the methodology is based on critical psychology, which has informed our approach of analyzing the current set of discourses and proposing alternative perspectives to guide our field. Results:the results of this critical analysis are to 1) recommend that applied psychology link more intentionally to the objectives of the International Labor Organization; and 2) to adopt critical theories and perspectives to support efforts to expand the impact for all citizens who work and who wish to work. Conclusions: we have identified two particular perspectives—Humanitarian Work Psychology and the Psychology of Working as meta-perspectives that will foster more inclusive and impactful scholarship and practices by applied psychologists. Action/Impact: We identify several new lines of inquiry that we believe will help applied psychologists to embrace the mission of the Decent Work Agenda and related perspectives both in public policy and psychology (e.g., research on universal basic income; caregiving and marketplace work).

                                                                                    Affiliation: Department of Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology, Boston College, Boston, Massachusetts, USA


                                                                                    Presenter: Richard A. Young, Sheila K. Marshall, and Tim Stainton

                                                                                    Title: Constructing career for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities: The perspective of goal-directed action

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                                                                                    Abstract: Career development, specifically obtaining decent work, is challenging for many young people because of a variety of economic and political conditions. It is particularly challenging for young people who have intellectual or development disabilities (IDD), who often encounter significant barriers in engaging in economic and social activities.
                                                                                    Based on a re-conceptualization of career from the perspective of goal-directed action, the action-project method was used to examine the joint projects between the parents of young people with IDD and between parents and the young people themselves.
                                                                                    Several joint actions between these two sets of participants contributing to the young persons’ construction of career were identified, including supportive or re-negotiating relationships, planning, equipping the young person for future endeavors, balancing other family needs, and coping with challenges. The resources needed for these projects successfully were identified. The proposed conceptualization and findings emphasize self-determination and empowerment not by isolating the person from social support but by identifying explicitly and facilitating how these joint actions lead to the construction of life-enhancing career. The publication of these findings has impact on developing research agenda using the perspective of goal-directed action, which is particularly important given the population of young people with IDD, whose agency as actors in their own lives can easily be discounted.
                                                                                    Background/rationale: Career development, specifically obtaining decent work, is challenging for many young people because of a variety of economic and political conditions. It is particularly challenging for young people who have intellectual or development disabilities (IDD), who often encounter significant barriers in engaging in economic and social activities.
                                                                                    Methods: Based on a re-conceptualization of career from the perspective of goal-directed action, the action-project method was used to examine the joint projects between the parents of young people with IDD and between parents and the young people themselves.
                                                                                    Results: Several joint actions between these two sets of participants contributing to the young persons’ construction of career were identified, including supportive or re-negotiating relationships, planning, equipping the young person for future endeavors, balancing other family needs, and coping with challenges. The resources needed for these projects successfully were identified.
                                                                                    Conclusions: The proposed conceptualization and findings emphasize self-determination and empowerment not by isolating the person from social support but by identifying explicitly and facilitating how these joint actions lead to the construction of life-enhancing career.
                                                                                    Action/Impact: The publication of these findings has impact on developing research agenda using the perspective of goal-directed action, which is particularly important given the population of young people with IDD, whose agency as actors in their own lives can easily be discounted.

                                                                                    Affiliation: University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada


                                                                                    Presenter: Lawrence H. Gerstein, and Ashley N. Hutchison

                                                                                    Title: Emerging Adults’ Future Perceptions: Implications for Social Justice Initiatives

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                                                                                    Abstract: Emerging adulthood (Arnett, 2000) is a time when individuals, in part, think about their identity and life story (McAdams & McLean, 2013), and contemplate and decide on their vocational choices and life domains (Dolli, 2012; Erikson, 1968; Nurmi, 1991; Super, 1990). Emerging adulthood starts in the late teens and continues into the mid-twenties. During this period, persons also reflect more seriously on their future. Such reflection is often called one’s future perceptions. These perceptions encompass an individuals’ view of their future events, ambition, and life roles (Seginer, 1988). Not surprisingly, future perceptions are important in identity construction and career development (Bandura, 2001; Nurmi, 1991). This presentation will highlight three qualitative studies targeting the future perceptions of emerging adult Hong Kong women, and U.S. and Israeli women and men. Each study was guided by Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT; Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994) and Career Construction Theory (CCT; Savickas, 1997). Along with a summary of the results discovered in these studies that were derived from thematic analysis, the presentation will offer implications of the findings for social justice initiatives including how psychologists can assist emerging adults to 1) balance their work-family roles and responsibilities, 2) enhance their quality of life, 3) secure and maintain their leisure time and activities, 4) address their financial aspirations, challenges, and obligations, and 5) engage in their communities. Prevention, psychoeducation, and systemic strategies grounded in SCCT, CCT, developmental theory, and strategic and social justice paradigms will be introduced to address items 1-5 just mentioned.
                                                                                    Background: Emerging adulthood is a time when individuals think about their identity, contemplate the future, and decide on vocational choices. It starts in the late teens and continues into the mid-twenties. Little is known about the future perceptions of this population and the implications of such perceptions for social justice initiatives.
                                                                                    Methods: This presentation highlights three qualitative studies targeting the future perceptions of emerging adult Hong Kong women, and U.S. and Israeli women and men. Each study was guided by Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) and Career Construction Theory (CCT).
                                                                                    Results: Thematic analysis was employed to assess participants’ responses and to generate themes. Teams of coders conducted the analyses.
                                                                                    Conclusions: In general, the following themes were identified in each of the studies (a) Work, (b) Family and Relationships, (c) Education, (d) Finances, (e) Location (f) Leisure, and (g) General Quality of Life.
                                                                                    Action/Impact: Implications for social justice initiatives will be offered including how psychologists can assist emerging adults to balance work-family roles, enhance quality of life, secure leisure time, address financial challenges, and engage in communities. Strategies grounded in SCCT, CCT, developmental theory, and social justice will be introduced to address these initiatives.

                                                                                    Affiliation: Lawrence H. Gerstein - Department of Counseling and Department of Counseling Psychology, Social Psychology, and Counseling, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana, USA
                                                                                    Ashley N. Hutchison - Department of Counseling Psychology and Community Services, The University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota, USA


                                                                                    Presenter: Valérie Cohen-Scali, Issa Abdou Moumoula and David Blustein

                                                                                    Title: Representations of work among youth in developing countries: the case of young workers in Burkina-Faso

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                                                                                    Abstract: Decent work is characterized by a set of minimum objective standards, such as fair incomes, good working conditions, security, social protection (ILO). These elements are central for workers’ health and their overall well-being. Numerous researchers in psychology have also emphasized the role of the subjective aspects of work, such as social connections and self-determination (as reflected in the Psychology of Working Theory). The aim of this presentation is to reflect on the subjective aspects of work for marginalized youth in developing countries. Ten semi-directive interviews have been conducted with young low educated workers in Burkina Faso (Africa) about their representations of work. A thematic content analysis was carried out. The results show that these young workers do not perceive their job as decent and are mainly motivated to fulfill their survival needs by having a salary. They also conveyed some attachment to their work and are satisfied with being able to do their job well. Their work, albeit unsatisfactory in terms of their interests, plays a key role in the development of their social life, their family relations and the development of future perspectives. This study underlines the complexity of the representations of the work of marginalized youth as well as the importance of work for their identity and socialization.

                                                                                    Background: following researchers in psychology who have emphasized the role of the subjective aspects of work, such as social connections and self-determination (as reflected in the Psychology of Working Theory), the aim of this presentation is to reflect on the subjective aspects of work for marginalized youth in developing countries.
                                                                                    Methods: Ten semi-directive interviews have been conducted with young low educated workers in Burkina Faso (Africa) about their representations of work.
                                                                                    Results: The results show that these young workers do not perceive their job as decent and are mainly motivated to fulfill their survival needs by having a salary. They also conveyed some attachment to their work and are satisfied with being able to do their job well.
                                                                                    Conclusion: Career counseling interventions should take into account the whole life context of marginalized people and provide activities underlying the complexity of the activities done and the skills implemented through work analysis.
                                                                                    Impact: Counselling dialogues aiming at developing new self-expectations should also help them to give a new meaning to their future.

                                                                                    Affiliation: Valérie Cohen-Scali, Inetop-Cnam & University of Bordeaux, Paris, France
                                                                                    Issa Abdou Moumoula, University of Koudougou, Burkina-Faso
                                                                                    David L. Blustein, Boston College, Department of Counseling, Development, and Educational Psychology, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA

                                                                                    IAAP Division 17: Professional Psychology


                                                                                    Robyn Vines

                                                                                    Robyn Vines

                                                                                    Title of Symposium: The role of psychology in integrated mental health care: an international perspective

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                                                                                    Nominating Division/Section: Division 17: Professional Psychology

                                                                                    Abstract: This symposium will provide an overview of current progress in integrated psychological service delivery in the primary care setting in a number of western countries: USA, Australia, Canada, Norway and the United Kingdom. These integrated services attempt to redress the ongoing “medicalisation of unhappiness” across the western world for which medication is frequently seen as the first and only treatment of choice, leaving the crucial psychosocial dimensions of mental and general health undertreated. Primary Care Psychology is a growing area of practice and service delivery, at the core of which lies a collaborative model of mental and general health care involving appropriately trained psychologists working with family physicians in the general practice setting. Research evidence indicates that this integrated mental health care approach for complex, often comorbid physiological and psychological conditions, results in best outcomes for patients. The key objective of the model of care is to provide evidence-based interventions for common mental health disorders previously under- and inappropriately-treated (eg. depression, anxiety and stress disorders), chronic disease and its behavioural and mental health sequellae, and frequent comorbid conditions (such as alcohol and other drug disorders) presenting in the primary care setting. It enables the “right treatment, at the right time, in the right place” and prevents the stigma and fragmentation of care still frequently associated with referral to secondary and tertiary treatment facilities. Current research, service delivery and funding models, and optimal training frameworks to facilitate an integrated model of care (eg. those recently introduced at the APA) will be explored, as well as barriers to the optimal roll-out of these psychological services. The symposium will focus on evidence-based primary care interventions and training models, and will provide an up-date on current progress in facilitating this multidisciplinary model of care and workforce development internationally.

                                                                                    Bio:

                                                                                    Affiliation: Clinical and Health Psychologist, Bathurst Rural Clinical School, School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Bathurst, Australia

                                                                                    Presenter: James H. Bray

                                                                                    Title: Primary Care Psychology in the United States: Addressing Behavioural Health and Substance Use Problems in Primary Care

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                                                                                    Abstract: Primary care psychology is an exciting new area for the profession. In the U.S., primary care medical providers treat over 70% of mental health and substance use problems, without assistance from psychologists or any other mental health providers. The opportunities in primary care psychology necessitate additional knowledge of primary care and different skills in caring for primary care patients. This presentation will discuss (1) the present status of psychologists working in primary care in the United States and its relationship to the health care reforms that are occurring; (2) practice opportunities in primary care in private and public settings; (3) the use of technology and electronic health records in primary care practice; (4) the most common mental health and substance use problems seen in primary care; and (5) future challenges in developing integrated health care systems and training models for the future of psychology practice.

                                                                                    Affiliation: President, American Psychological Association
                                                                                    Past President, Texas Psychological Association
                                                                                    Chairman and Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Texas San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA


                                                                                    Presenter: Tor Levin Hoffgard

                                                                                    Title: Making change happen. Getting from general ignorance, to a future with integrated teams in primary care

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                                                                                    Abstract: High priority on health promotion, prevention and early intervention has been agreed upon by the World Health Organization as the only sustainable way to meet the challenge of the growing number of people struggling with mental health problems in the world. Still, most countries put their resources almost exclusively into hospitals, and treatment of severe health problems. In this talk I will present how it can be different. I will present examples from Norway - and what we have seen as major developments in the policy on mental health in the last 10 years. From general ignorance of the whole idea of primary care, through policy change, piloting of services, evaluation, to the near future with integrated primary care teams with psychologists as key collaborators with all other services in the municipalities.

                                                                                    Affiliation:


                                                                                    Presenter: Susan H. McDaniel & Laurie Sands

                                                                                    Title: Collaborative Care for a Complex, Life-Threatening Problem: An Example Of Systemic Integrated Care

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                                                                                    Abstract: Rather than constructing a narrative about the work of this family and their healthcare team, this presentation will use actual quotes from videos and emails to allow the participants tell the story of integrated care with an 82-year-old woman who immigrated to the US with multiple serious medical and mental health problems and her 54-year-old son. The collaborative team caring for this family included the referring family physician, a family therapy postdoctoral fellow, and the presenter--a family health psychologist.

                                                                                    Affiliation:


                                                                                    Presenter: Jean Grenier & Marie Helene Chomienne

                                                                                    Title: Challenges in Collaboration in Primary Care, the importance of being earnest

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                                                                                    Background: With the arrival in office of a new administration, the Canadian federal government is focusing on transferring health funds to the provinces for mental health. This transfer of funds to provinces with insistence on improving mental health services may (or may not...) open up new avenues to increasing Canadians’ access to evidence-based psychological treatments.
                                                                                    Objectives: To discuss some of these new political developments and their potential impacts on primary care psychology will be discussed. Method: Overview of the differents models across Canada: We will presnt and discuss concrete forms of collaborative practices for psychologists that already exist at the primary care level and how this may vary from province to province. Results ; Synthesis of the barriers and success stories in collaborative practice of Psychology in Primary Care Conclusion On going challenges, including the various degrees of collaboration that can truly exist at the primary care level on a day-to-day basis, opportunities for training future primary care psychologists, as well as opportunities for improvements in all of these areas, will also be presented and discussed.

                                                                                    Affiliation:
                                                                                    Jean Grenier, Professeur clinique associé à l'École de Psychologie, Université d'Ottawa

                                                                                    Professeur adjoint au département de Médecine familiale, Université d'Ottawa
                                                                                    Co-Directeur - Unité de recherche en soins primaires de l'Institut de recherche de l'Hôpital Montfort
                                                                                    Institut de recherche de l'Hôpital Montfort, Ottawa, Canada
                                                                                    Marie-Hélène Chomienne, Professeur-adjoint au département de médecine familiale et au département d'épidémiologie, Université d'Ottawa

                                                                                    Co directrice Unité de recherche en soins primaires , Institut de Recherche Hôpital Montfort(IRHM), Ottawa, Canada


                                                                                    Presenter: Professor Peter Kinderman

                                                                                    Title: Psychological wellbeing in primary care : the UK perspective

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                                                                                    Abstract: Since 1946, the UK’s National Health Service has aspired to an integrated healthcare system, including both psychological and physical heath, with an emphasis on health promotion, prevention and early intervention, and led or coordinated through our General Practitioner (Family Doctor) primary care service. Clinical psychology has, over the past 20 years, played a key role in this, with a rapid growth in the number of clinical psychologists employed in the UK. Investment has targeted CBT, for mild-to-moderate depression and anxiety, in adults of working age, and in primary care, although the programme is now broadening to children and young people, older adults, psychotic problems and problems associated with medical conditions. In addition, political developments, including putting commissioning power in the hands of primary care physicians and an emphasis on wellbeing at central government level, are significant for primary care psychology. This presentation will focus on likely future developments, and the consequences for clinical psychology, including our relationship with other professions, especially CBT and other psychological therapists, and will argue that, especially in primary care, we must retain a focus on helping people maintain their functioning and wellbeing rather than focus too much on treating mental illnesses.

                                                                                    Affiliation: Past President, British Psychological Society
                                                                                    Professor of Clinical Psychology, Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, University of Liverpool, UK


                                                                                    Presenter: Diana L. Prescott

                                                                                    Title: Access to Behavioral Healthcare for Rural Populations

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                                                                                    Abstract: Access to behavioral healthcare for rural populations is a major concern shared by psychologists in Europe and the United States. Integrated care provides an exciting new way for the profession to provide access to behavioral healthcare for the underserved, including those in rural, less populated areas. In the U.S., primary care medical providers treat over 70 percent of mental health and substance use problems, without assistance from psychologists or any other mental health providers. Integrated care provides a vehicle to provide timely psychological intervention for major health problems, such as depression/suicide substance abuse, and obesity. This presentation will highlight (1) rural psychology practice; (2) integrated care practice; (3) the use of technology and electronic health records in integrated care; (4) depression, suicide, and other mental health problems in rural areas; (5) the crisis of substance abuse and addiction; and (6) how rates of pediatric obesity can be effectively reduced through integrated care psychology practice.

                                                                                    Affiliation: Clinical Psychologist
                                                                                    Hampden Psychological Consultation, PLLC, Hampden, Maine, USA

                                                                                    Convenor/Discussant: Robyn Vines

                                                                                    IAAP Division 18: History of Applied Psychology

                                                                                    CPA Section: Industrial / Organizational Psychology

                                                                                    CPA Section: Psychology in the Military

                                                                                    CPA Section: Educational and School Psychology

                                                                                    CPA Section: Social and Personality

                                                                                    CPA Section: Environmental Psychology

                                                                                    CPA Section: Educational and School Psychology

                                                                                    CPA Section: Teaching of Psychology

                                                                                    CPA Section: Clinical Psychology

                                                                                    CPA Section: Community Psychology

                                                                                    CPA Section: Clinical Neuropsychology

                                                                                    CPA Section: Adult Development and Aging

                                                                                    CPA Section: Psychologists and Retirement

                                                                                    CPA Section: Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine

                                                                                    CPA Section: Criminal Justice Psychology

                                                                                    CPA Section: Social and Personality

                                                                                    CPA Section: Extremism and Terrorism

                                                                                    CPA Section: Sport and Exercise Psychology

                                                                                    CPA Section: Brain & Cognitive Science

                                                                                    CPA Section: Students

                                                                                    CPA Section: Counseling

                                                                                    CPA Section: Psychologists in Hospitals and Health Centers

                                                                                    CPA Section: History and Philosophy Section

                                                                                    CPA Section: Quantitative Electrophysiology

                                                                                    CPA Section: Quantitative Methods

                                                                                    CPA Section: Section on Women and Psychology (SWAP)

                                                                                    CPA Section: Family Psychology

                                                                                    CPA Section: Traumatic Stress

                                                                                    CPA Section: Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

                                                                                    CPA Section: Rural and Northern Psychology

                                                                                    CPA Section: International and Cross-Cultural Psychology

                                                                                    CPA Section: Aboriginal Psychology


                                                                                    Jeff Ansloos

                                                                                    Jeff Ansloos

                                                                                    Focus of Lecture: Title TBC

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                                                                                    Sponsoring Section: Aboriginal Psychology Section and Rural and Northern Psychology Section

                                                                                    Abstract:

                                                                                    Bio:

                                                                                    Affiliation:

                                                                                    CPA Section: Developmental Psychology